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Faculty Development

 
Adjunct Faculty Voices
Cultivating Professional Development and Community at the Front Lines of Higher Education
Foreword by Adrianna Kezar
As the debate regarding the increasing use of adjunct faculty in higher education continues to swirl, the voices of adjunct faculty themselves are rarely heard. Stories abound regarding the poor working conditions in which most adjunct faculty labor, yet many of those that employ adjunct faculty are unaware of how the conditions impact an adjunct's ability to teach effectively. Adjunct Faculty Voices gives a voice to this growing population. It shares the experiences and clear benefits adjuncts gain from having access to professional development opportunities. In spite of a shortage of resources, there are institutions offering development programs that target the pressing needs of this population. The first part of the book features the voices of adjunct faculty who tell their stories of finding professional development and creating or connecting with communities of colleagues for mutual support. These adjunct voices represent a range of disciplinary perspectives, career stages, and institutional types. In the second section, the authors draw upon a benchmarking study of adjunct faculty developing programs, examine specific challenges and highlight successful practices. Institutions can support adjunct faculty through teaching academies and faculty learning communities; mentor programs; conference support; and adjunct faculty liaison positions. Topics discussed include: • Best professional development practices that support and benefit adjunct faculty • Faculty social isolation and community-building opportunities • An overview of changes affecting the academic workforce • An outline of issues and working conditions • Current demographics and types of adjunct faculty • Survey results from adjunct faculty developers • Adjunct faculty narratives featuring their professional development and community experiences Teaching and Learning centers across the country are responding to the growing adjunct cohort in innovative and efficient ways. Administrators, deans, department chairs, and adjunct faculty will all benefit by hearing the voices of adjuncts as they express the challenges faced by adjunct faculty and the types of professional development opportunities which are most beneficial.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 371 3 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 372 0 / $25.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 374 4 / $19.99
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Advancing the Culture of Teaching on Campus
How a Teaching Center Can Make a Difference
Foreword by Lester P. Monts
Written by the director and staff of the first, and one of the largest, teaching centers in American higher education – the University of Michigan’s Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) – this book offers a unique perspective on the strategies for making a teaching center integral to an institution’s educational mission. It presents a comprehensive vision for running a wide range of related programs, and provides faculty developers elsewhere with ideas and material to prompt reflection on the management and practices of their centers – whatever their size – and on how best to create a culture of teaching on their campuses. Given that only about a fifth of all U.S. postsecondary institutions have a teaching center, this book also offers a wealth of ideas and models for those administrators who are considering the development of new centers on their campuses. Topics covered include: • The role of the director, budgetary strategies, and operational principles • Strategies for using evaluation to enhance and grow a teaching center • Relationships with center constituencies: faculty, provost, deans, and department chairs • Engagement with curricular reform and assessment • Strengthening diversity through faculty development • Engaging faculty in effective use of instructional technology • Using student feedback for instructional improvement • Using action research to improve teaching and learning • Incorporating role play and theatre in faculty development • Developing graduate students as consultants • Preparing future faculty for teaching • The challenges of faculty development at a research university In the concluding chapter, to provide additional context about the issues that teaching centers face today, twenty experienced center directors who operate in similar environments share their main challenges, and the strategies they have developed to overcome them through innovative programming and careful management of their resources. Their contributions fall into four broad categories: institutional-level challenges, engaging faculty and students and supporting engaged pedagogy, discipline-specific programming, and programming to address specific instructor career stages.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 479 0 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 480 6 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 724 1 / $27.99
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Catalyst in Action
Case Studies of High-Impact ePortfolio Practice
Published in association with AAC&U In 2017, Bret Eynon and Laura M. Gambino released High-Impact ePortfolio Practice, which drew broad acclaim from faculty and educational leaders. “An instant classic,” wrote one reviewer. “The book I’ve been waiting for!” exclaimed another. With compelling evidence of the impact of ePortfolio “done well,” and a practical framework for educators to follow, this research study quickly led to the formal recognition of ePortfolio as a validated High Impact Practice. Now, with Catalyst in Action: Case Studies of High-Impact ePortfolio Practice, Eynon and Gambino have taken the next step. The book offers 20 powerful case studies, drawn from campuses ranging from Bronx Community College to Yale University, from the University of South Carolina, to Dublin University and Arizona State. In High Impact ePortfolio Practice, Eynon and Gambino outlined the Catalyst Framework, spotlighting the strategies needed to launch, build and sustain a “high-impact” ePortfolio practice. Linking integrative social pedagogy to technology, assessment and professional development, the Catalyst Framework offers guiding principles and classroom-based ePortfolio practices that improve student success, deepen the student learning experience, and catalyze learning-centered institutional change. In Catalyst in Action, teams of faculty and college leaders detail their experiences exploring and testing the Framework on their campuses. Working with diverse groups of students in a broad range of disciplines and settings, the case study authors put Eynon and Gambino’s integrative strategies into practice. Catalyst in Action shares their findings and their insights. As higher education enters a challenging new era, it must find new ways adapt and change, to support and demonstrate student growth and development. Catalyst in Action is a powerful combination of intensive research and practical experiencing. Offering exciting new evidence and fresh new insights, Catalyst in Action will be an invaluable resource for those who wish to build student success, advance higher learning, and meet the demands of the 21st century.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 866 4 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 867 1 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 869 5 / $27.99
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Clickers in the Classroom
Using Classroom Response Systems to Increase Student Learning
Foreword by James Rhem
With classroom response systems (or CRSs, also known as Student Response Systems, Individual Response Systems, or, informally, “clickers”) in use in higher education for some 20 years, there is now both ample research and a wealth of examples and ideas to draw on for faculty who are contemplating their use, or exploring new ways to integrate them in their teaching. The research demonstrates that, integrated purposefully in courses, the use of clickers aligns with what neuroscience tells us about the formation of memory and the development of learning. In addition, they elicit contributions from otherwise reticent students and enhance collaboration, even in large lecture courses; foster more honest responses to discussion prompts; increase students’ engagement and satisfaction with the classroom environment; and provide an instantaneous method of formative assessment. This book presents a brief history of the development of CRSs and a survey of empirical research to provide a context for current best practices, and then presents seven chapters providing authentic, effective examples of the use of clickers across a wide range of academic disciplines, demonstrating how they can be effective in helping students to recognize their misconceptions and grasp fundamental concepts. Like all pedagogical interventions, classroom response systems are no panacea, and the experienced contributors candidly describe avoidable pitfalls while demonstrating how clickers can deepen student learning and how, by providing instantaneous feedback, they enable teachers to make adjustments on the fly to better address student understandings or misunderstandings. The final chapter explores pros and cons of response systems that use mobile devices and smart phones, and the book concludes with an annotated list of further resources, such as books, articles, and videos.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 279 2 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 280 8 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 282 2 / $19.99
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The Coach's Guide for Women Professors
Who Want a Successful Career and a Well-Balanced Life
Foreword by Frances Rosenbluth
If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, this is a book you need to pick up. I know or suspect that I am underpaid, but I hate negotiating. I do everything else first and then write in the time left over. I’m not sure exactly what the promotion requirements are in my department. Since earning tenure, my service load has increased and my research is suffering. I don’t get enough time with my family. This is a practical guide for women in academe – whether adjuncts, professors or administrators – who often encounter barriers and hostility, especially women of color, and generally carry a heavier load of service, as well as household and care responsibilities, than their male colleagues. Rena Seltzer, a respected life coach and trainer who has worked with women professors and academic leaders for many years, offers succinct advice on how you can prioritize the multiplicity of demands on your life, negotiate better, create support networks, and move your career forward. Using telling but disguised vignettes of the experiences of women she has mentored, Rena Seltzer offers insights and strategies for managing the situations that all women face – such as challenges to their authority – while also paying attention to how they often play out differently for Latinas, Black and Asian women. She covers issues that arise from early career to senior administrator positions. This is a book you can read cover to cover or dip into as you encounter concerns about time management; your authority and influence; work/life balance; problems with teaching; leadership; negotiating better; finding time to write; developing your networks and social support; or navigating tenure and promotion and your career beyond.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 895 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 896 5 / $19.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 898 9 / $15.99
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Coming in from the Margins
Faculty Development’s Emerging Organizational Development Role in Institutional Change
Why is it critical for faculty development centers to reexamine their core mission today? The core argument of this book – that a necessary and significant role change is underway in faculty development – is a call for centers to merge the traditional responsibilities and services of the past several decades with a leadership role as organizational developers. Failing collectively to define and outline the dimensions and expertise of this new role puts centers at risk of not only marginalization, but of dissolution. When a TLC is busy and in demand, it is hard to believe that it may be, despite all the activity and palpable array of daily outcomes, institutionally marginalized. The actual and increasing potential of marginalization and center closings may help motivate this field to recognize the danger of complacency or remaining stuck in an old paradigm that exclusively defines itself as instructional development or supportive service. Proposing a newly defined organizational development role for academic and faculty developers and directors of teaching and learning centers, Coming in from the Margins examines how significant involvement in broader institutional change initiatives is becoming a critical aspect of this work. Although undefined and unrecognized as a significant dimension of this work, the organizational development role increasingly demanded of developers is far more attuned with the demand for change facing higher education than ever before. The book provides evidence-based research into what directors of centers are currently doing as organizational developers, and how they shape, influence, and plan institutional initiatives that intersect with teaching and learning. Directors of centers, their supervisors, and leaders in the field provide models, from a wide range of institutional contexts, as well as the strategies they have employed to successfully engage in significant organizational development. They also demonstrate how they handled the challenges that ensued. The strategies in each chapter provide a practical resource and guide for re-examining the mission and structure of existing centers, or for designing new centers of teaching and learning and, most importantly, to develop their role as change agents. The book covers such topics as: Center mission statements; Center staffing; Center advisory boards; committee involvement; unique expertise, knowledge and skills; embedding Centers in strategic planning; Center vision; organizational change processes; collaboration and partnerships; institutional priorities and initiatives; relationships with upper administration.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 362 5 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 363 2 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 504 9 / $25.99
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The Community Engagement Professional's Guidebook
A Companion to The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education
Foreword by Andrew J. Seligsohn
This book is a companion guide to Campus Compact’s successful publication The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education. In the first text, Campus Compact Research Fellows - led by award-winning scholar-practitioner Lina D. Dostilio - identified a core of set of competencies needed by professionals charged with leading community engaged work on college campuses. In this companion guide, Dostilio teams up with Marshall Welch to build on the initial framework by offering guidance for how a community engagement professional (CEP) should conceptualize, understand, and develop their practice in each of the original competency areas. Over 10 chapters the authors address questions for those “brand new to the role” and interested in how to start a community engagement unit or center, or from people who are considering jobs doing the work on a campus, or from individuals “are trying to navigate the political environment on their campuses to expand and deepen their unit’s reach.” The Guidebook offers a rich and deep dive, breaking down the essential components of a professional’s work. From mentoring faculty research, leading campaigns to build civic engagement curriculum on campus, to managing the staff who support community engagement units, Dostilio and Welch tackle the breadth of the CEP’s work by drawing on key resources and their own decades of experience in the field. Throughout the book, readers will encounter “Compass Points” that call for personal reflection and engagement with the text. These interactive moments combine with end-of-chapter questions to prompt thinking about a CEP’s critical commitments, to create a powerful and engaging toolkit that will be essential for any person doing community and civic engagement work on campus.

Cloth: 978 1 945459 17 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 945459 18 4 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 945459 20 7 / $31.99
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Connecting the Dots
Developing Student Learning Outcomes and Outcomes-Based Assessment
Demands for quality at all levels of education are higher than they have ever been. Making clear what students must learn is being stressed by Federal and State governments and by professional and national accreditation organizations. This book is designed to help faculty and institutions of higher education meet these demands by obtaining, managing, using, and reporting valid outcome attainment measures at the course level; and mapping outcome attainment from the course level to departmental, degree program, and institutional levels, and beyond. It demonstrates how to communicate clearly what students are supposed to know and be able to do; write assessments that measure the expectations; and produce test scores that are valid for their intended use and interpretation, so that valid inferences can be made about students and programs. It is a “how-to” manual that is rich with guidelines, model forms, and examples that will lead the reader through the steps to “connect the dots” from outcomes assessment to outcomes-based reporting. This new edition incorporates several enhancements including additional examples, tables, and figures that help clarify and expand the three-level outcomes and assessment model. A new Chapter 9 introduces a census approach to obtaining outcome attainment measures at the program and institutional levels and shows how to link outcome values to outcome statements from outside sources such as national and professional organizations. Chapter 9 concludes with a discussion on obtaining and using outcome attainment values at the student level with the aid of modern technologies.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 479 6 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 480 2 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 482 6 / $19.99
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Contingent Academic Labor
Evaluating Conditions to Improve Student Outcomes
Foreword by Adrianna Kezar
Contingent Academic Labor is a concise guide that offers higher education professionals a way to measure the degree of equality taking place in work environments for non-tenure track faculty across institutional settings. It frames the relevant issues and examines the nationwide situation facing contingent faculty across the professional landscape. The goal is to review contingent faculty treatment, and offer a standardized way to identify both equitable and unjust practices that impact adjunct faculty and their students by extension. The main feature of this guide is The Contingent Labor Conditions Score, a tool to help evaluate current labor practices that impact adjuncts in both positive and negative ways. The report card measures 3 areas of labor conditions: *Material Equity: Pay, job security and benefits *Professional Equity: Opportunities for advancement, professional development, academic freedom, sense of professional inclusion, and job satisfaction *Social Equity: Gender and race parity between contingent and non-contingent faculty in proportion to the population served This book will be useful for administrators and labor organizers alike in assessing the degree of exploitation, or empowerment, in their own institution. The Contingent Labor Conditions Score, as a standardized tool, will serve audiences on both sides of the discussion in creating positive steps forward, improving not only contingent faculty working conditions, but ultimately improving student outcomes.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 251 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 252 5 / $19.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 254 9 / $15.99
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Creating the Path to Success in the Classroom
Teaching to Close the Graduation Gap for Minority, First-Generation, and Academically Unprepared Students
Foreword by Stephen Carroll
This is a book for all faculty who are concerned with promoting the persistence of all students whom they teach. Most recognize that faculty play a major role in student retention and success because they typically have more direct contact with students than others on campus. However, little attention has been paid to role of the faculty in this specific mission or to the corresponding characteristics of teaching, teacher-student interactions, and connection to student affairs activities that lead to students’ long-term engagement, to their academic success, and ultimately to graduation. At a time when the numbers of underrepresented students – working adults, minority, first-generation, low-income, and international students – is increasing, this book, a companion to her earlier Teaching Underprepared Students, addresses that lack of specific guidance by providing faculty with additional evidence-based instructional practices geared toward reaching all the students in their classrooms, including those from groups that traditionally have been the least successful, while maintaining high standards and expectations. Recognizing that there are no easy answers, Kathleen Gabriel offers faculty ideas that can be incorporated in, or modified to align with, faculty’s existing teaching methods. She covers topics such as creating a positive and inclusive course climate, fostering a community of learners, increasing engagement and students’ interactions, activating connections with culturally relevant material, reinforcing self-efficacy with growth mindset and mental toughness techniques, improving lectures by building in meaningful educational activities, designing reading and writing assignments for stimulating deep learning and critical thinking, and making grade and assessment choices that can promote learning.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 555 1 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 556 8 / $27.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 558 2 / $21.99
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Deadly Professors
A Faculty Development Mystery
Despite flecks of the victim’s blood and what looked like part of an eyebrow, one could make out the letters etched in an artistic, painstaking script that formed the killer’s message: Hippocrite “Great. A perp who can’t spell,” said Jarvis. “So you think it’s a student?” Professor Roland Norris has been murdered in the early morning hours on the grounds of Välkommen University, and the discovery of the crime sets the scene for Thomas Jones’ new campus mystery. As two more murders rattle the university, St. Paul detectives LeRon Jarvis and Robert Phan increasingly focus on the victims’ connections to Jack Ramble, professor of literature and chair of the department. Are the crimes motivated by academic rivalries or the university’s finances? A frantic golf cart chase down the 10th fairway of the East Oaks Country Club finally reveals all… As with Thomas Jones’ previous academic mystery, The Missing Professor, this book is a parody of the mystery genre and campus life, but with a serious purpose. In 26 entertaining and succinct chapters, the story line raises such issues as the nature of today’s college students, faculty roles and responsibilities, mid-career concerns, the purpose of liberal education, racial diversity, micro-aggression, inclusive teaching, technology and learning, politics and the classroom, active learning, the role of sports in higher education, and academic freedom, to name but a few. This book will enliven, and ensure spirited discussion at any orientation, workshop, or faculty development activity.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 449 3 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 450 9 / $23.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 514 8 / $18.99
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Designing a Motivational Syllabus
Creating a Learning Path for Student Engagement
Foreword by Kathleen F. Gabriel
A thoughtfully constructed syllabus can be transformative for your students’ learning, communicating the path they can take to succeed. This book demonstrates how, rather than being a mundane document to convey policies, you can construct your syllabus to be a motivating resource that conveys a clear sense of your course’s learning goals, how students can achieve those goals, and makes evident your teaching philosophy and why you have adopted the teaching strategies you will use, such as discussion or group activities. Developing or revising a syllabus also presents you with a perfect opportunity to review the learning possibilities for the semester. Well-designed, it can help you stay focused on achieving the learning outcomes, as well as determine if the class is on track and whether adjustments to the schedule are needed. The authors show how, by adopting a welcoming tone and clearly stating learning outcomes, your syllabus can engage students by explaining the relevance of your course to their studies, create an all-important positive first impression of you as an instructor, and guide students through the resources you will be using, the assignments ahead, as well as clear guidance on how they will be assessed. Referred to frequently as the course progresses, an effective syllabus will keep students engaged and on task. Christine Harrington and Melissa Thomas lead you through all the elements of a syllabus to help you identify how to present key messages and information about your course, think through the impressions you want to create, and, equally importantly, suggest how you can use layout and elements such as images and charts to make your syllabus visually appealing and easy to navigate.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 624 0 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 625 7 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 627 1 / $19.99
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Developing Faculty Learning Communities at Two-Year Colleges
Collaborative Models to Improve Teaching and Learning
Foreword by Milton D. Cox
This book introduces community college faculty and faculty developers to the use of faculty learning communities (FLCs) as a means for faculty themselves to investigate and surmount student learning problems they encounter in their classrooms, and as an effective and low-cost strategy for faculty developers working with few resources to stimulate innovative teaching that leads to student persistence and improved learning outcomes. Two-year college instructors face the unique challenge of teaching a mix of learners, from the developmental to high-achievers, that requires using a variety of instructional strategies and techniques. Even the most experienced teachers can find this diversity demanding. Faculty developers at many two-year colleges still rely solely on the one-day workshop model that, while useful, rarely results in sustained student-centered changes in pedagogy or the curriculum, and may not be practicable for the growing cohort of part-time faculty members. By linking work in the classroom with scholarship and reflection, FLCs provide participants with a sense of renewed engagement and stimulate collegial exploration of ways to achieve educational excellence. FLCs are usually faculty-instigated and cross-disciplinary, and comprise groups of six to fifteen faculty that work collaboratively through regular meetings over an extended period of time to promote research and an exchange of experiences, foster community, and develop the scholarship of teaching. FLCs alleviate burnout and isolation, promote the development, testing, and peer review of new classroom strategies or technologies, and lead to the reenergizing and professionalization of teachers. This book introduces the reader to FLCs and to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, offering examples of application in two-year colleges. Individual chapters describe, among others, an FLC set up to support course redesign; an “Adjunct Connectivity FLC” to integrate part-time faculty within a department and collaborate on the curriculum; a cross-disciplinary FLC to promote student self-regulated learning, and improve academic performance and persistence; a critical thinking FLC that sought to define critical thinking in separate disciplines, examine interdisciplinary cross-over of critical thinking, and measure critical thinking more accurately; an FLC that researched the transfer of learning and developed strategies to promote students’ application of their learning across courses and beyond the classroom. Each chapter describes the formation of its FLC, the processes it engaged in, what worked and did not, and the outcomes achieved. Just as when college faculty fail to remain current in their fields, the failure to engage in continuing development of teaching skills, will equally lead teaching and learning to suffer. When two-year college administrators restrain scholarship and reflection as inappropriate for the real work of the institution they are in fact hindering the professionalization of their teaching force that is essential to institutional mission and student success. When FLCs are supported by leaders and administrators, and faculty learn that collaboration and peer review are valued and even expected as part of being a teaching professional, they become intrinsically motivated and committed to collaboratively solving problems, setting the institution on a path to becoming a learning organization that is proactive and adept at navigating change.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 844 6 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 845 3 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 847 7 / $25.99
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Dynamic Lecturing
Research-Based Strategies to Enhance Lecture Effectiveness
Foreword by José Antonio Bowen
Is the lecture an outmoded teaching method that inhibits active learning or is it a potentially powerful tool that is an essential part of every teacher’s repertoire? This book presents up-to-date research on the different types of lecture, on what constitutes effective lecturing, and on the impact of lecturing when done appropriately and well. It fills the void in professional development resources on how to lecture, validating the practice when it’s aligned with the educational mission of creating engaged learning environments. Christine Harrington and Todd Zakrajsek demonstrate that, rather than lecture and active learning being mutually exclusive or either-or propositions, the effectiveness of the former can be greatly enhanced when combined with active learning techniques through what they define as dynamic lecturing; and provide context about the need to balance these approaches to meet the needs of students as they progress from novice to advanced learners. They present a range of strategies that enhance student learning during lectures. They open each chapter with the evidence behind each lecturing strategy they describe, and conclude with practical suggestions for quick application in the classroom. They offer readers the lecture planning and evaluation tools for reworking their lectures in ways that provide high-level engagement and achievement for their students. The opening section of the book explores the benefits of lecturing and describes the different modalities of lecture, with an assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of each. The second section focuses on educational strategies to enhance the lecture, including, among others, activating prior knowledge, emphasizing important points, effectively using multi-media, making concepts meaningful via examples, and the importance of retrieval practice. Each covers the underlying theory and research, and advice on how to align the engagement techniques with instructional goals. The book concludes with guidance on effective planning for lecturing and helping chairs, administrators, or peers engage in effective evaluation of the lecture. This is a dynamic resource for all faculty interested in revitalizing their teaching. The strategies are succinct, easy to incorporate into lectures and, done well, will have immediate impact and increase student mastery of course content.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 616 5 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 617 2 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 619 6 / $19.99
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Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence
Current Practices, Future Imperatives
The first decade of the 21st century brought major challenges to higher education, all of which have implications for and impact the future of faculty professional development. This volume provides the field with an important snapshot of faculty development structures, priorities and practices in a period of change, and uses the collective wisdom of those engaged with teaching, learning, and faculty development centers and programs to identify important new directions for practice. Building on their previous study of a decade ago, published under the title of Creating the Future of Faculty Development, the authors explore questions of professional preparation and pathways, programmatic priorities, collaboration, and assessment. Since the publication of this earlier study, the pressures on faculty development have only escalated—demands for greater accountability from regional and disciplinary accreditors, fiscal constraints, increasing diversity in types of faculty appointments, and expansion of new technologies for research and teaching. Centers have been asked to address a wider range of institutional issues and priorities based on these challenges. How have they responded and what strategies should centers be considering? These are the questions this book addresses. For this new study the authors re-surveyed faculty developers on perceived priorities for the field as well as practices and services offered. They also examined more deeply than the earlier study the organization of faculty development, including characteristics of directors; operating budgets and staffing levels of centers; and patterns of collaboration, re-organization and consolidation. In doing so they elicited information on centers’ “signature programs,” and the ways that they assess the impact of their programs on teaching and learning and other key outcomes. What emerges from the findings are what the authors term a new Age of Evidence, influenced by heightened stakeholder interest in the outcomes of undergraduate education and characterized by a focus on assessing the impact of instruction on student learning, of academic programs on student success, and of faculty development in institutional mission priorities. Faculty developers are responding to institutional needs for assessment, at the same time as they are being asked to address a wider range of institutional priorities in areas such as blended and online teaching, diversity, and the scale-up of evidence-based practices. They face the need to broaden their audiences, and address the needs of part-time, non-tenure-track, and graduate student instructors as well as of pre-tenure and post-tenure faculty. They are also feeling increased pressure to demonstrate the “return on investment” of their programs. This book describes how these faculty development and institutional needs and priorities are being addressed through linkages, collaborations, and networks across institutional units; and highlights the increasing role of faculty development professionals as organizational “change agents” at the department and institutional levels, serving as experts on the needs of faculty in larger organizational discussions.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 267 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 268 6 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 270 9 / $23.99
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Faculty Mentoring
A Practical Manual for Mentors, Mentees, Administrators, and Faculty Developers
Foreword by Milton D. Cox
Faculty mentoring programs greatly benefit the institutions that have instituted them, and are effective in attracting and retaining good faculty. Prospective faculty members commonly ask about mentoring at on-campus interviews, and indicate that it is a consideration when choosing a position. Mentoring programs also increase the retention rate of junior faculty, greatly reducing recruitment costs, and particularly help integrate women, minority and international faculty members into the institution, while providing all new hires with an orientation to the culture, mission and identity of the college or university. The book provides step-by-step guidelines for setting up, planning, and facilitating mentoring programs for new faculty members, whether one-on-one, or using a successful group model developed and refined over twenty-five years by the authors. While it offers detailed guidance on instituting such programs at the departmental level, it also makes the case for establishing school or institutional level programs, and delineates the considerable benefits and economies of scale these can achieve. The authors provide guidance for mentors and mentees on developing group mentoring and individual mentor / protégé relationships – the corresponding chapters being available online for separate purchase; as well as detailed outlines and advice to department chairs, administrators and facilitators on how to establish and conduct institution-wide group mentoring programs, and apply or modify the material to meet their specific needs. For training and faculty development purposes, we also offer two chapters as individual e-booklets. Each respectively provides a succinct summary of the roles and expectations of the roles of Mentor and Mentee. Faculty Mentoring / Mentor Guide Faculty Mentoring / Mentee Guide The booklets are affordably priced, and intended for individual purchase by mentors and mentees, and are only available through our Web site.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 171 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 172 6 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 174 0 / $23.99
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Faculty Mentoring / Mentee Guide
Tips for Mentors Inside or Outside the Department
Faculty Mentoring / Mentee Guide comprises Chapter Three of Faculty Mentoring, together with the following material from the appendices: * Confidentiality Form * Needs Assessment * and the Five Year Plan. A companion volume, Faculty Mentoring / Mentor Guide, is also available. The booklets are affordably priced, and intended for individual purchase by mentors and mentees. They are only available through Stylus’ Web site, and are supplied in two digital formats: E-pub (for all devices using Android or IOS operating systems) and PDF (downloadable to PC and Mac computers, and any device that supports Adobe Digital Editions). They may be downloaded to up to six devices.

E-Book: 978 1 62036 274 7 / $5.00
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Faculty Mentoring / Mentor Guide
Tips for Mentors Inside or Outside the Department
Faculty Mentoring / Mentor Guide comprises Chapter One of Faculty Mentoring, together with the following material from the appendices: * Confidentiality Form * Needs Assessment * and the Five Year Plan. A companion volume, Faculty Mentoring / Mentee Guide, is also available. The booklets are affordably priced, and intended for individual purchase by mentors and mentees. They are only available through Stylus’ Web site, and are supplied in two digital formats: E-pub (for all devices using Android or IOS operating systems) and PDF (downloadable to PC and Mac computers, and any device that supports Adobe Digital Editions). They may be downloaded to up to six devices.

E-Book: 978 1 62036 273 0 / $5.00
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Faculty Retirement
Best Practices for Navigating the Transition
Foreword by Lotte Bailyn
Co-published with ACE. This book addresses the critical and looming issue of retirement in higher education as the cohort of boomer generation faculty come to the close of their careers. On the one hand institutions need to replenish themselves, and so need older employees to retire. On the other, mass retirements can decimate departments, creating the need for mass hirings that will create another crisis in the future. At the same time, with the elimination of mandatory retirement, many faculty are working on into and beyond their seventies because they feel they still have much to contribute, because their identities are closely tied to their work, because they wish to remain connected to their institutions, or for financial reasons. Given institutions’ legal constraints and planning exigencies, and faculties’ varied motivations, what are the options that can satisfy the needs of both parties? This book presents a range of examples of how institutions of all types and sizes are addressing these dilemmas, and how faculty members have helped create or shape policies that address their needs and allow them to continue to play meaningful roles at their institutions. The contributors describe practices that address the concerns of those already nearing or in retirement, propose approaches to creating opportunities to start these sensitive discussions and address financial planning at early career stages, and outline strategies for developing clear structures and policies and communication so that individuals have a full understanding of their options as they make life-changing decisions. This book presents models from fifteen colleges and universities identified by the American Council on Education through a competition for having developed innovative and effective ways to help faculty transition into retirement. It offers clear messages about the need for greater transparency in addressing retirement and transitions, for better communication, and for close coordination between human resources and academic administrators. It offers a roadmap for HR personnel, senior administrators, department chairs, and faculty themselves.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 191 7 / $95.00
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Flipped Learning
A Guide for Higher Education Faculty
Foreword by Jon Bergmann
Flipped learning is an approach to the design and instruction of classes through which, with appropriate guidance, students gain their first exposure to new concepts and material prior to class, thus freeing up time during class for the activities where students typically need the most help, such as applications of the basic material and engaging in deeper discussions and creative work with it. While flipped learning has generated a great deal of excitement, given the evidence demonstrating its potential to transform students’ learning, engagement and metacognitive skills, there has up to now been no comprehensive guide to using this teaching approach in higher education. Robert Talbert, who has close to a decade’s experience using flipped learning for majors in his discipline, in general education courses, in large and small sections, as well as online courses – and is a frequent workshop presenter and speaker on the topic – offers faculty a practical, step-by-step, “how-to” to this powerful teaching method. He addresses readers who want to explore this approach to teaching, those who have recently embarked on it, as well as experienced practitioners, balancing an account of research on flipped learning and its theoretical bases, with course design concepts to guide them set up courses to use flipped learning effectively, tips and case studies of actual classes across various disciplines, and practical considerations such as obtaining buy-in from students, and getting students to do the pre-class activities. This book is for anyone seeking ways to get students to better learn the content of their course, take more responsibility for their work, become more self-regulated as learners, work harder and smarter during class time, and engage positively with course material. As a teaching method, flipped learning becomes demonstrably more powerful when adopted across departments. It is an idea that offers the promise of transforming teaching in higher education.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 431 4 / $95.00
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A Guide for Leaders in Higher Education
Core Concepts, Competencies, and Tools
Foreword by Doug Lederman
At a time when higher education faces the unprecedented challenges of declining revenues and increased scrutiny, questions about access, cost, and the value of degrees, and the imperative to educate a more diverse student body, there is an urgent need for leadership that is conversant with, and able to deploy, the competencies, management tools, and strategic skills that go beyond the technical or disciplinary preparation and “on the job” training that most leaders have received. This book is intended as a practical resource for academic and administrative leaders in higher education who seek guidance in dealing with today’s complexity, opportunities, and demands. It is also addressed to those who aspire to hold positions of leadership, and to the many faculty and staff members who serve in informal leadership roles within their departments, disciplines, or institutions. Additionally, the book serves as a guide and resource for those responsible for the design and implementation of leadership development programs in higher education. While recognizing the differences in mission and circumstance across institutional types, the authors begin by offering a foundational understanding of higher education as a sector, the political, social, and economic climate in which it operates, and the potential opportunities ahead. Subsequent sections of the book cover leadership concepts and competencies, along with a series of applied tools for leadership and organizational effectiveness. Each chapter concludes with related case studies and guiding questions for further reflection. The final section highlights models for developing institutional leadership programs that progressively meet the needs of leaders along their careers. The content and format of this book reflect the authors’ views that leadership development is most effective when it is an intentional, reflective, and systematic experience. While they espouse the practice of general principles of leadership, they also take into account the unique context of higher education with its numerous internal and external stakeholders, multiple missions, particular organizational governance, and a culture that fosters individual autonomy and creativity.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 391 1 / $95.00
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Jump-Start Your Online Classroom
Mastering Five Challenges in Five Days
Every year, more online or technology-enhanced learning experiences are added to the landscape of education, and the number of students taking online courses on residential campuses continues to grow. In addition, new instructional tools are creating environments that are mobile, interactive, and collaborative. These trends present challenges to the online classroom, and this book will help instructors meet those challenges. Jump-Start Your Online Classroom prepares a first-time online instructor to successfully manage the first few weeks of a course, including activities to help instructors plan, manage, and facilitate online instruction; and provides resources helpful during the beginning weeks of class. Each chapter is developed around the immediate challenges instructors face when teaching online. The authors address everyday problems and suggest solutions informed by their extensive research and experience. The five challenges, which are designed to be addressed in five days, are to: • Make the transition to online teaching • Build online spaces for learning • Prepare students for online learning • Manage and facilitating the online classroom • Assess learner outcomes in an online classroom The book is based on the authors’ design and facilitation model that identifies five elements comprising an online learning environment: digital tools, participants, social practices, learning community, and outcomes. The book shows how each of those aspects influences instructional practices and interacts to create an environment for a meaningful online educational experience.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 580 9 / $95.00
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Making Global Learning Universal
Promoting Inclusion and Success for All Students
Foreword by Caryn McTighe Musil
Co-published with NAFSA. While there is wide consensus in higher education that global learning is essential for all students’ success, there are few models of how to achieve this goal. The authors of this book, all of whom are from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse research universities, provide such a model and, in doing so, offer readers a broad definition of global learning that both encompasses a wide variety of modes and experiences—in-person, online, and in co-curricular activities at home and abroad—and engages all students on campus. They provide a replicable set of strategies that embed global learning throughout the curriculum and facilitate high quality, high-impact global learning for all students. The approach this book describes is based upon three principles: that global learning is a process to be experienced, not a thing to be produced; that it requires all students’ participation—particularly the underrepresented—and cannot succeed if reserved for a select few; and that global learning involves more than mastery of a particular body of knowledge. The authors conceptualize global learning as the process of diverse people collaboratively analyzing and addressing complex problems that transcend borders of all kinds. They demonstrate how institutions can enable all students to determine relationships among diverse perspectives on problems and develop equitable, sustainable solutions for the world’s interconnected human and natural communities. What’s more, they describe how a leadership process—collective impact—can enable all stakeholders across departments and disciplines to align and integrate universal global learning throughout the institution and achieve the aims of inclusive excellence. Providing examples of practice, this book: • Offers a model to make global learning universal; • Provides a definition of global learning that incorporates diversity, collaboration, and problem solving as essential components; • Describes effective leadership for implementation consistent with the attributes of global learning; • Illustrates integrative, high-impact global learning strategies within the access pipeline, students’ coursework, and co-curricular activities; • Offers practical strategies for global learning professional development, student learning assessment, and program evaluation; • Promotes inclusive excellence through universal global learning. This book is co-published with NAFSA.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 359 1 / $95.00
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Modeling Mentoring Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender
Practices to Cultivate the Next Generation of Diverse Faculty
While mentorship has been shown to be critical in helping graduate students persist and complete their studies, and enter upon and succeed in their academic careers, the under-representation of faculty of color and women in higher education greatly reduces the opportunities for graduate students from these selfsame groups to find mentors of their race, ethnicity or gender. Recognizing that mentoring across gender, race and ethnicity inserts levels of complexity to this important process, this book both fills a major gap in the literature and provides an in-depth look at successful mentorships between senior white and under-represented scholars and emerging women scholars and scholars of color. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, this book presents chapters written by scholars who share in-depth descriptions of their cross-gender and/or cross-race/ethnicity mentoring relationships. Each article is co-authored by mentors who are established senior scholars and their former protégés with whom they have continuing collegial relationships. Their descriptions provide rich insights into the importance of these relationships, and for developing the academic pipeline for women scholars and scholars of color. Drawing on a comparative analysis of the literature and of the narrative chapters, the editors conclude by identifying the key characteristics and pathways for developing successful mentoring relationships across race, ethnicity or gender, and by offering recommendations for institutional policy and individual mentoring practice. For administrators and faculty concerned about diversity in graduate programs and academic departments, they offer clear models of how to nurture the productive scholars and teachers needed for tomorrow’s demographic of students; for under-represented students, they offer compelling narratives about the rewards and challenges of good mentorship to inform their expectations and the relationships they will develop as protégés.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 487 5 / $95.00
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The New Talent Acquisition Frontier
Integrating HR and Diversity Strategy in the Private and Public Sectors and Higher Education
Awarded a Silver Medal in the category Human Resources and Employee Training from the 2014 Axiom Business Book Awards • Create the inclusive, high performance workforce needed to succeed in an increasing multicultural society and global marketplace • Learn how global organizations and leading professional associations develop integrated HR/diversity talent strategies, and the specific challenges they face • Get practical tools to assess integrated HR/diversity strategic planning, and see why organizations are not making more diversity progress • Develop specific performance indicators to track your progress in implementing synergistic HR/diversity approaches • Case studies of SHRM, federal and state government, global corporations, and higher education illustrate systematic, integrated HR/diversity efforts For HR professionals and leaders, chief diversity officers, line managers, and executives in the private and public sectors and higher education, this book presents a systematic approach to integrating HR practices and strategic diversity initiatives to create the inclusive, high performance workforce that every enterprise and institution needs to succeed in an increasingly multicultural society and global marketplace. The authors’ point of departure is that talent is the primary strategic asset necessary for organizational survival and success in a demographically diversifying and globally interconnected world. Organizations seeking to attain their full potential in this new talent frontier must optimize their human capital resources by the deliberate development of synergy between human resource (HR) and diversity programs. Failure to integrate and coordinate these two functions will erode organizational competitiveness, whether it is in developing new markets, products, programs, or services. As the first book to provide a concrete roadmap to integrated HR and diversity strategy, the authors identify two critical practices: talent management through the orchestration of HR and diversity programs to enhance organizational capability by unleashing, mobilizing, nurturing, and sustaining the contributions of a diverse and talented workforce; and talent sustainability through the close integration of HR and diversity to continuously develop systems, structures, processes, and a culture that heighten employee commitment, engagement, and inclusion. They further believe that there should be a commonality of practice across all types of organizations, and that each sector can learn from the others to accelerate its adaptation to today’s rapidly shifting national and global realities. Based on the most current research and on interviews with HR and diversity leaders in major organizations, this book provides the reader with concrete strategies and practical tools for implementing a successful and sustainable talent management program. It also addresses common barriers to the development of synergistic HR and diversity strategy, and how to overcome them. Given the evolutionary nature of the integration of HR and diversity, the authors present nine extensive case studies from all organizational sectors, as well as from the two leading Human Resource professional associations – the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR) – to illustrate the dynamic intersection between HR and diversity practices.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 083 5 / $45.00
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Overcoming Student Learning Bottlenecks
Decode the Critical Thinking of Your Discipline
Foreword by Dan Bernstein
Decoding the Disciplines is a widely-used and proven methodology that prompts teachers to identify the bottlenecks – the places where students get stuck – that impede learners’ paths to expert thinking in a discipline. The process is based on recognizing the gap between novice learning and expert thinking, and uncovering tacit knowledge that may not be made manifest in teaching. Through “decoding”, implicit expert knowledge can be turned into explicit mental tasks, and made available to students. This book presents a seven-step process for uncovering bottlenecks and determining the most effective way to enable students to surmount them. The authors explain how to apply the seven steps of Decoding the Disciplines – how to identify bottlenecks, unpack the critical thinking of experts, teach students how to do this kind of thinking, and how to evaluate the degree to which students have learned to do it. They provide in-depth descriptions of each step and, at the end of each chapter, at least one exercise the reader can do on his or her own. Because the decoding process works well with groups, they also provide exercises for leading groups through the process, making available to informal groups as well as groups led by professional developers, the tools to transform their understanding of teaching and learning by getting the student view that they refer to as “the bottleneck perspective”. Because it focuses on the mental moves that underlie the cognitive competencies we want students to develop, spelling out what critical thinking consists of for any field, the methodology helps teachers to get beyond focus on content delivery and transmission and provides criteria to select from the bewildering array of teaching tools the methods most appropriate to what they are teaching. This is a book for faculty who want their students to develop disciplinary forms of reasoning, and are moreover interested in a methodology with the potential to transform and reinvigorate their teaching. It is particularly suitable for use in communities of practice, and should be indispensable for any one engaged in cross-disciplinary teaching, as it enables co-teachers to surface each other’s tacit knowledge and disciplinary assumptions.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 664 6 / $95.00
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Pitch Perfect
Communicating with Traditional and Social Media for Scholars, Researchers, and Academic Leaders
Foreword by Robert Zemsky
This book is intended for scholars, researchers, and academic leaders who have a passion to share their knowledge outside their classroom, laboratory, or institution; who want to make a difference; and who believe that the information they possess and ideas they offer are important for a wider public. Pitch Perfect is a practical guide to communicating your knowledge and research to broader audiences. How do you get yourself heard amid the volume of news and information in today’s 24-hour news cycle, and get your message across in an environment where blogs and Twitter vie with traditional media? To break through, you need to amplify your ideas and make them relevant for a wider public audience. Bill Tyson – who has been successfully advising scholars and academic leaders on media relations for over 30 years – shows you how to undertake early and thoughtful communications planning, understand the needs and workings of the media, both traditional and digital, and tell your story in a way that will capture your audience. Bill Tyson is strategic in his advice, no less so when discussing how to engage with such social media as blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, podcasts or wikis. Whether you are working on research or a new initiative that has public implications, or have a story that deserves wide telling; whether you want to address funders’ requests for communications plans to promote the programs they are supporting, or whether you want to know how to publicize your new book; this practical guide offers insider advice – complete with case studies – on how to communicate your message. An appendix lists key media in North America, Australia, and the UK.

Paper: 978 1 57922 333 5 / $24.00
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POGIL
An Introduction to Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning for Those Who Wish to Empower Learners
Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a pedagogy that is based on research on how people learn and has been shown to lead to better student outcomes in many contexts and in a variety of academic disciplines. Beyond facilitating students’ mastery of a discipline, it promotes vital educational outcomes such as communication skills and critical thinking. Its active international community of practitioners provides accessible educational development and support for anyone developing related courses. Having started as a process developed by a group of chemistry professors focused on helping their students better grasp the concepts of general chemistry, The POGIL Project has grown into a dynamic organization of committed instructors who help each other transform classrooms and improve student success, develop curricular materials to assist this process, conduct research expanding what is known about learning and teaching, and provide professional development and collegiality from elementary teachers to college professors. As a pedagogy it has been shown to be effective in a variety of content areas and at different educational levels. This is an introduction to the process and the community. Every POGIL classroom is different and is a reflection of the uniqueness of the particular context – the institution, department, physical space, student body, and instructor – but follows a common structure in which students work cooperatively in self-managed small groups of three or four. The group work is focused on activities that are carefully designed and scaffolded to enable students to develop important concepts or to deepen and refine their understanding of those ideas or concepts for themselves, based entirely on data provided in class, not on prior reading of the textbook or other introduction to the topic. The learning environment is structured to support the development of process skills –– such as teamwork, effective communication, information processing, problem solving, and critical thinking. The instructor’s role is to facilitate the development of student concepts and process skills, not to simply deliver content to the students. The first part of this book introduces the theoretical and philosophical foundations of POGIL pedagogy and summarizes the literature demonstrating its efficacy. The second part of the book focusses on implementing POGIL, covering the formation and effective management of student teams, offering guidance on the selection and writing of POGIL activities, as well as on facilitation, teaching large classes, and assessment. The book concludes with examples of implementation in STEM and non-STEM disciplines as well as guidance on how to get started. Appendices provide additional resources and information about The POGIL Project.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 543 4 / $95.00
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The Prudent Professor
Planning and Saving for a Worry-Free Retirement from Academe
This is a guide for anyone in the academy – faculty member, administrator or professional staff – at whatever point she or he may be along the career path. Whether you are a newly-minted Ph.D. landing your first job, at mid career, or even already retired and concerned about how long your money might last, Ed Bridges offers you a straightforward, easy-to-grasp, and structured way to think about money, learn how it works, understand the priorities for your stage in life, determine your objectives, and develop a personal plan most likely to achieve them. Why a book specifically for those who work in higher education? The chances are that your retirement funds are mostly invested in TIAA-CREF funds, and that the plans created by the different institutions where you have worked, or will work, impose sometimes conflicting limitations of how you can manage your retirement money. This is potentially complex terrain with which many professional financial advisors are unfamiliar. This book provides ample guidance for you to manage your retirement funds, but if you do prefer to seek professional advice, it sets out the criteria for choosing a reliable advisor, and may even be a book from which your advisor can benefit if he or she is not fully conversant with TIAA-CREF’s offerings, and the quirks of academic retirement plans. What makes this book unique is that Ed Bridges shares with you his self-education about the risky business of investing and retirement planning. As he writes, “In schooling myself, I adopted the mind-set that I had used as a social scientist for the past forty-six years. I distinguished between fact and opinion and scrutinized the evidence behind every author’s claims; moreover, I searched for research that might corroborate or refute these claims. In the process, I learned a great deal about the route I should have taken to retirement from the time I accepted my first academic appointment to the time I submitted my intention to retire. Join me as I relive my long journey so that you may avoid my wrong turns and succeed in reaching your ultimate destination, a worry-free retirement, despite the risks and uncertainties you will surely face when you retire.” The book includes simple questionnaires and worksheets to help you determine where you stand, and think through your options.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 467 7 / $95.00
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Publicly Engaged Scholars
Next-Generation Engagement and the Future of Higher Education
Foreword by Timothy K. Eatman
Afterword by Peter Levine
The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university. This book presents the voices of a new generation of scholars, educators, and practitioners who are committed to civic renewal and the public purposes of higher education. They question existing policies, structures, and practices, and put forward new forms of engagement that can help to shape and transform higher education to align it with societal needs. The scholars featured in this book make the case for public scholarship and argue that, in order to strengthen the democratic purposes of higher education for a viable future that is relevant to the needs of a changing society, we must recognize and support new models of teaching and research, and the need for fundamental changes in the core practices, policies, and cultures of the academy. These scholars act on their values through collaboration, inclusiveness, participation, task sharing, and reciprocity in public problem solving. Central to their approach is an authentic respect for the expertise and experience that all stakeholders contribute to education, knowledge generation, and community building. This book offers a vision of the university as a part of an ecosystem of knowledge production, addressing public problems with the purpose of advancing a more inclusive, deliberative democracy; and explores the new paradigm for teaching, learning, and knowledge creation necessary to make it a reality.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 263 1 / $95.00
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Real-Time Student Assessment
Meeting the Imperative for Improved Time to Degree, Closing the Opportunity Gap, and Assuring Student Competencies for 21st-Century Needs
Foreword by George D. Kuh
This book challenges institutions and their programs to prioritize the use of chronological assessment results to benefit enrolled students in comparison with the more common practice of prolonged assessment cycles that generally benefit future students. Peggy Maki advocates for real-time assessment processes to identify patterns of underperformance and obstacles that require timely interventions for enrolled students to succeed. In tandem with the sets of educational practices and policies that many institutions have now undertaken to close achievement and graduation rates across our diverse student demographics, such as developing clear degree pathways, she calls on all higher education providers – if they are to remain relevant and meet their social purpose in our complex world – to urgently recalibrate their assessment processes to focus on currently enrolled students’ progress towards achieving a high-quality degree, regardless of when they matriculate or re-enter higher education. She demonstrates that we already have sufficient examples and evidence to implement real-time assessment of students as they progress through their studies. She draws on the practices of specialized accredited programs, such as those in the professions that assess in real time; on the experiences of institutions that have adopted competency-based education; and on the affordances of technologies that now provide faculty and students with up-to-the-minute diagnostics. She identifies the six principles necessary to implement a real-time assessment process, illustrated by case studies of how campuses have operationalized them to advance students’ equitable progress towards achieving a high-quality degree; and demonstrates the benefits of real-time assessment compared to more future-oriented processes, among which is engaging students in reflecting on their own progress along their degree pathways. She advocates for the use of well documented national outcomes-based frameworks such as Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP), its aligned Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education scoring rubrics ( VALUE), the Degree Qualifications Profile, and discipline-based outcomes assessments to ensure high-quality degrees that meet well-defined standards and criteria. She also identifies how data systems and technological developments help to monitor closely and respond in time to students’ patterns of underperformance. The book is an urgent call for higher education to achieve the values of equity, transparency and quality it espouses; and ensure that all students graduate in a timely fashion with the competencies they need to be active and productive citizens.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 487 1 / $95.00
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Reconceptualizing Faculty Development in Service-Learning/Community Engagement
Exploring Intersections, Frameworks, and Models of Practice
Foreword by L. Dee Fink
The role of educational developer in the realm of service-learning and community engagement (S-LCE) is multidimensional. Given the potentially transformational nature--for both faculty and students--of the experiences and courses in whose design they may be directly or indirectly involved, as well as their responsibility to the communities served by these initiatives, they have to be particularly attentive to issues of identity, values, and roles. As both practitioners and facilitators, they are often positioned as third-space professionals. This edited volume provides educational developers and community engagement professionals an analysis of approaches to faculty development around service-learning and community engagement. Using an openly self-reflective approach, the contributors to this volume offer an array of examples and models, as well as realistic strategies, to empower readers to evolve their faculty development efforts in service-learning and community engagement on their respective campuses. It is also a call for recognition that the practice of S-LCE needs to be institutionalized and improved. The book further addresses the field’s potential contributions to scholarship, such as the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), publically engaged scholarship, and collaborative inquiry, among others. The case studies provide an outline of program models and promising practices, including an authentic analysis of the institutional context within which they operate, the positionality of the practitioner-scholars overseeing them, the resources required, and the evidence related to both successes and challenges of these approaches. The contributed chapters are organized under four themes: the landscape of faculty development and community engagement; models of faculty development in S-LCE; challenges and opportunities in pedagogy and partnerships; and engendering change in educational development.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 612 7 / $95.00
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Shaping Your Career
A Guide for Early Career Faculty
Foreword by Ann E. Austin
Going beyond providing you with the tools, strategies, and approaches that you need to navigate the complexity of academic life, Don Haviland, Anna Ortiz, and Laura Henriques offer an empowering framework for taking ownership of and becoming an active agent in shaping your career. This book recognizes, as its point of departure, that faculty are rarely prepared for the range of roles they need to play or the varied institutions in which they may work, let alone understand how to navigate institutional context, manage the politics of academe, develop positive professional relationships, align individual goals with institutional expectations, or possess the time management skills to juggle the conflicting demands on their time. The book is infused by the authors’ love for what they do while also recognizing the challenging nature of their work. In demonstrating how you can manage your career, they weave in the personal and institutional dimensions of their experience and offer vignettes from their longitudinal study of pre-tenure faculty to illustrate typical issues you may have to contend with, and normalize many of the concerns you may face as a new member of the academy. This book offers you: • The resources, tips, and strategies to develop a strong, healthy career as a faculty member • Empowerment— you take ownership of and become an active agent in shaping your career • Advice and strategies to help women and members of traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic groups navigate institutional structures that affect them differently • An understanding of the changing nature of academic work, and of how to grow and succeed in this new environment While explicitly addressed to early career faculty, this book’s message of empowerment is of equal utility for full-time faculty, both tenure-track and non-tenure track, and can usefully serve as a text for graduate courses. Department chairs, deans, and faculty developers will find it a useful resource to offer their new colleagues.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 443 7 / $95.00
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SoTL in Action
Illuminating Critical Moments of Practice
Edited by Nancy L. Chick
Foreword by James Rhem
What are the foundational moments of meaningful scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) projects? How do teacher-scholars collect, develop, and share useful insights about student learning? How do they work through the pinch points that frustrate, confuse, or elude many SoTL practitioners? By unpacking SoTL processes through rich narratives that illustrate what they look like, this collection offers inspiration to anyone at any stage of engagement with SoTL. This book takes discussions of SoTL to a new level. Its subtitle reflects the microscopic lenses SoTL processes can apply to student learning experiences to understand how they happen, what they look like, what they mean, and what we can do about them. Going beyond definitions, how-to, theory, and debates about methods and standards, the contributors offer a SoTL primer documenting how practitioners have intentionally thought through key moments in their work. These procedural vignettes present powerful examples of what doing SoTL looks like when done well. The authors represent a range of disciplines (the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and professions) and a mixture of familiar and unfamiliar names. Nancy Chick has selected contributions that compellingly illuminate why their authors focused on a particular critical moment, the questions they asked as they refined their approaches, and the theoretical and observational tools they employed to conduct their research. Each introduces a specific critical moment in doing SoTL, taking the reader through the author’s reflections, concerns, and choices in doing meaningful SoTL work. The aim is to support potential practitioners, inform educational developers who teach new SoTL practitioners, and inspire experienced SoTL scholars to reflect on their own practice. This is a compelling collection for anyone interested in practitioner reflection, intentional design, and advancing the field of SoTL and the quality of teaching and learning.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 692 9 / $95.00
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Success After Tenure
Supporting Mid-Career Faculty
This book brings together leading practitioners and scholars engaged in professional development programming for and research on mid-career faculty members. The chapters focus on key areas of career development and advancement that can enhance both individual growth and institutional change to better support mid-career faculties. The mid-career stage is the longest segment of the faculty career and it contains the largest cohort of faculty. Also, mid-career faculty are tasked with being the next generation of faculty leaders and mentors on their respective campuses, with little to no supports to do so effectively, at a time when higher education continues to face unprecedented challenges while managing continued goal of diversifying both the student and faculty bodies. The stories, examples, data, and resources shared in this book will provide inspiration--and reality checks--to the administrators, faculty developers, and department chairs charged with better supporting their faculties as they engage in academic work. Current and prospective faculty members will learn about trends in mid-career faculty development resources, see examples of how to create such supports when they are lacking on their campuses, and gain insights on how to strategically advance their own careers based on the realities of the professoriate. The book features a variety of institution types: community colleges, regional/comprehensive institutions, liberal arts colleges, public research universities, ivy league institutions, international institutions, and those with targeted missions such as HSI/MSI and Jesuit. Topics include faculty development for formal and informal leadership roles; strategies to support professional growth, renewal, time and people management; teaching and learning as a form of scholarship; the role of learning communities and networks as a source of support and professional revitalization; global engagement to support scholarship and teaching; strategies to recruit, retain, and promote underrepresented faculty populations; the policy-practice connection; and gender differences related to key mid-career outcomes. While the authors acknowledge that the challenges facing the mid-career stage are numerous and varying, they offer a counter narrative by looking at ways that faculty and/or institutions can assert themselves to find opportunities within challenging contexts. They suggest that these challenges highlight priority mentoring areas, and support the creation of new and innovative faculty development supports at institutional, departmental, and individual levels.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 680 6 / $95.00
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Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters!
Fostering Student Success Through Faculty-Centered Practice Improvement
Foreword by Rosemary Arca
“College teaching is not rocket science – it’s much, much harder.” Diana Laurillard, University of London College faculty, both adjunct and full-time, stand with their students at the coalface of learning, wishing for more to succeed and disappointed at how illusory academic success is for so many. Among the array of investments colleges are making to improve student outcomes, from predictive data analysis to enhanced advising, too little attention is paid to supporting faculty. Yet the impact of teacher and teaching on student learning is incontrovertible. Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters! stands against the tide – celebrating the incredible work faculty members do each day and challenging them to expand their capacity to present their content expertise effectively. This book presents a model of embedded professional development, which capitalizes on the affordances of technology to enable groups of faculty to examine their practice in a non-evaluative context, but with a clear focus on improvement. The core of the work involves individual reflection and the design provides for an accessible way to “see” into the classrooms of discipline peers. Most importantly, the Taking College Teaching Seriously experience is not an intense one-shot, but rather a structured opportunity for a faculty member to examine and adapt practice over time and to assess the impact of changes on student learning. Faculty who have participated in the Taking College Teaching Seriously experience found it to be transformative: • English Professor, Kentucky: Participating in (the work) this year has helped me to be more reflective in every single action. I constantly analyze how each session went… (it) gave me the tools to think about every minute detail of a classroom. • Adjunct Math Professor, Mississippi: Speaking as an adjunct, I have valued the chance to share my teaching and get ideas from others. I can honestly say that this experience has been a lifeline of sorts this year. In a “magic wand” instructional setting, I’d wish for the kind of honest, respectful and professionally challenging discussions we have in Classroom Notebook* at weekly staff meetings. *Classroom Notebook is the Taking College Teaching Seriously online platform • Math Professor, NJ: I think the continual self-evaluation and reflection allowed us to work together to brainstorm improvements and positive tweaks to be more purposeful in our classrooms as opposed to just randomly reaching in the dark for ideas and techniques in HOPE of success. Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters! breaks new ground in professional development. Each faculty member is at the center of the learning experience, stimulated and supported by peers working in similar contexts. They share a desire to see more students learn deeply and find that honing their skill at adapting to the learning needs of specific classes and students allows them to realize this goal. Uniquely, Taking College Teaching Seriously illuminates the link between faculty teaching expertise and improving student outcomes. The introduction to the book examines the challenges facing faculty in higher education today and reviews the literature on teaching and learning. Chapter 1 looks at the analytical foundations for all of the model’s elements, from adult learning theory to communities of practice, and Chapter 2 presents the model’s theory of change. Chapter 3 describes the model in detail and Chapters 4 and 5 concern the infrastructure of the faculty collaborative community, focusing on both its interpersonal and technological dimensions. The book concludes in Chapter 6 with an assessment of the value of this approach to professional development and a call to action for faculty member engagement in this important work, so essential to both professional passion and mandate.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 079 8 / $95.00
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Teaching Across Cultural Strengths
A Guide to Balancing Integrated and Individuated Cultural Frameworks in College Teaching
Foreword by Joseph L. White
Co-published in association with Promoting learning among college students is an elusive challenge, and all the more so when faculty and students come from differing cultures. This comprehensive guide addresses the continuing gaps in our knowledge about the role of culture in learning; and offers an empirically-based framework and model, together with practical strategies, to assist faculty in transforming college teaching for all their students through an understanding of and teaching to their strengths. Recognizing that each student learns in culturally influenced ways, and that each instructor’s teaching is equally influenced by her or his background and experiences, the authors offer an approach by which teachers can progressively learn about culture while they transform their teaching through reflection and the application of new practices that enrich student learning. The key premise of the book is that deepening student learning and increasing retention and graduation rates requires teaching from a strengths based perspective that recognizes the cultural assets that students bring to higher education, and to their own learning. Derived through research and practice, the authors present their Model of Cultural Frameworks in College Teaching and Learning that highlights eight continua towards achieving the transformation of teaching, and developing more culturally balanced and inclusive practices, over time. They present techniques – illustrated by numerous examples and narratives – for building on cultural strengths in teaching; offer tips and strategies for teaching through cultural dilemmas; and provide culturally reflective exercises. This guide is intended for all faculty, faculty developers or administrators in higher education concerned with equitable outcomes in higher education and with ensuring that all student cultural groups learn and graduate at the same rates.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 323 2 / $95.00
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Teaching Interculturally
A Framework for Integrating Disciplinary Knowledge and Intercultural Development
Foreword by Peter Felten
How can I simultaneously support students' critical engagement with course content and develop their intercultural awareness? Most faculty have multiple diversities present in any given classroom or academic program— whether from an influx of international students or an increase of students from low-income, first generation, and/or racial/ethnic minority populations— and are concerned about how to maintain a rigorous curriculum and ensure that all their students succeed, given disparate backgrounds and varying degrees of prior knowledge. This book provides faculty and instructors with a theoretical foundation, practical tools, and an iterative and reflective process for designing and implementing an intercultural pedagogy. The authors bring to bear the expertise of their various disciplinary backgrounds to offer a responsive, integrative framework to develop and continually refine a pedagogy that both promotes deep disciplinary learning and supports intercultural outcomes for all students. The authors offer a framework that is flexible enough to be responsive to the experience, environment, and particulars of a given teaching and learning situation. The text incorporates narrative text by the authors, as well as first-person reflections, classroom activities, and annotated assignments that illustrate the dynamic process of intention, experiment/implement, critique, and refinement that characterize pedagogy and intercultural interaction. The authors bring to bear the expertise of their various disciplinary backgrounds, a deep knowledge of effective pedagogical practice, and their experience and grounding in intercultural practice: Amy in composition/writing studies, Mary Katherine in international education with rich experience as a faculty development trainer, and Bob and Catherine, respectively, an historian and a family scientist. This book is intended both for individual reading as well as for collective study in learning communities.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 379 9 / $95.00
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Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning
A Guide to Theory and Practice
The third edition of Patricia Cranton’s Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning brings a wealth of new insight from the tremendous growth in the field during the decade since the previous edition. As in the previous editions, the book helps adult educators understand what transformative learning is, distinguish it from other forms of learning, and foster it in their practice. The first part of the book is dedicated to clarifying transformative learning theory and relating it to other theoretical frameworks. The author examines transformative learning from the learner’s perspective, and discusses individual differences in how learners go through the process. In the second half of the book, the focus is squarely on strategies for promoting transformative learning in a wide variety of adult and higher education contexts. Practitioners will be able to take ideas from the text and apply them directly in their teaching. Since 1975, transformative learning has become a core theoretical perspective in adult and higher education, and research has proliferated. In the past decade, adult education and especially transformative learning grew into a noticeably larger field. The numbers of undergraduate and graduate programs in adult education have increased and continue to increase as more and more individuals are seeking the expertise, skills, and training necessary to work with adult learners in higher education, business, industry, government, health professions, non-profit organizations, and community development. In addition, the number of programs in higher education (both undergraduate and graduate) that include courses in transformative learning has grown dramatically. These academic audiences use the book to further their understanding of transformative learning theory and practice. Drawing on the latest research as well as the author’s own teaching experience in both online and face-to-face courses, this new edition will be a vital resource for members of the transformative learning community, as well as those encountering the topic for the first time.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 411 6 / $95.00
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Understanding Writing Transfer
Implications for Transformative Student Learning in Higher Education
While education is based on the broad assumption that what one learns here can transfer over there– across critical transitions – what do we really know about the transfer of knowledge? The question is all the more urgent at a time when there are pressures to “unbundle” higher education to target learning particular subjects and skills for occupational credentialing to the detriment of integrative education that enables students to make connections and integrate their knowledge, skills and habits of mind into a adaptable and critical stance toward the world This book – the fruit of two-year multi-institutional studies by forty-five researchers from twenty-eight institutions in five countries – identifies enabling practices for, and five essential principles about, writing transfer that should inform decision-making by all higher education stakeholders about how to generally promote the transfer of knowledge. This collection concisely summarizes what we know about writing transfer and explores the implications of writing transfer research for universities’ institutional decisions about writing across the curriculum requirements, general education programs, online and hybrid learning, outcomes assessment, writing-supported experiential learning, e-portfolios, first-year experiences, and other higher education initiatives. This volume makes writing transfer research accessible to administrators, faculty decision makers, and other stakeholders across the curriculum who have a vested interest in preparing students to succeed in their future writing tasks in academia, the workplace, and their civic lives, and offers a framework for addressing the tensions between competency-based education and the integration of knowledge so vital for our society.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 584 7 / $95.00
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Why Students Resist Learning
A Practical Model for Understanding and Helping Students
Foreword by John Tagg
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations. The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated understanding of the various causes of student resistance to learning, providing them with a rationale for responding constructively, and enabling them to create conditions conducive to implementing effective learning strategies. In this book readers will discover an innovative integrated model that accounts for student behaviors and creates a foundation for intentional and informed discussion, evaluation, and the development of effective counter strategies. The model takes into account institutional context, environmental forces, students’ prior negative classroom experiences, their cognitive development, readiness to change, and metacognition. The various chapters take the reader through the model’s elements, exploring their practical implications for teaching, whether relating to course design, assessments, assignments, or interactions with students. The book includes a chapter written entirely by students, offering their insights into the causes of resistance, and their reflections on how participating on this project has affected them. While of great value for faculty, this book is also useful to faculty developers advising future and current faculty, as well as to administrators, offering insight into how institutional values impact teaching practice and student attitudes.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 343 0 / $95.00
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Write More, Publish More, Stress Less!
Five Key Principles for a Creative and Sustainable Scholarly Practice
In this book Dr. Dannelle D. Stevens offers five key principles that will bolster your knowledge of academic writing, enable you to develop a manageable, sustainable, and even enjoyable writing practice, and, in the process, effectively increase your publication output and promote your academic career. A successful and productive book and journal article author, writing coach, creator of a nationally-recognized, cross-disciplinary faculty writing program, and with a long career as a faculty member and experience as a department chair, Dr. Stevens offers a unique combination of motivation, reflective practices, analytical tools, templates, and advice to set you on the path to being a productive and creative writer. Drawing on her experience as a writer and on her extensive research into the psychology of writing and the craft of scholarly writing, Dr. Stevens starts from the premise that most faculty have never been taught to write and that writers, both experienced and novice, frequently experience anxiety and self-doubt that erode confidence. She begins by guiding readers to understand themselves as writers and discover what has impeded or stimulated them in the past to establish positive new attitudes and sustainable habits. Dr. Stevens provides strategies for setting doable goals, organizing a more productive writing life, and demonstrates the benefits of writing groups, including offering a variety of ways in which you can experiment with collaborative practice. In addition, she offers a series of reflections, exercises, and activities to spark your writing fluency and creativity. Whether developing journal articles, book chapters, book proposals, book reviews, or conference proposals, this book will help you demystify the hidden structures and common patterns in academic writing and help you match your manuscript to the language, structures, and conventions of your discipline--be it in the sciences, social sciences, or humanities. Most importantly, believing that connecting your passions with your work is essential to stimulating your ideas and enthusiasm, this essential guide offers you the knowledge and skills to write more.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 516 8 / $95.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 519 9 / $23.99
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