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CampusCompact - Professional Development

Professional Development

 
Adjunct Faculty Voices
Cultivating Professional Development and Community at the Front Lines of Higher Education
Foreword by Adrianna Kezar
As the debate regarding the increasing use of adjunct faculty in higher education continues to swirl, the voices of adjunct faculty themselves are rarely heard. Stories abound regarding the poor working conditions in which most adjunct faculty labor, yet many of those that employ adjunct faculty are unaware of how the conditions impact an adjunct's ability to teach effectively. Adjunct Faculty Voices gives a voice to this growing population. It shares the experiences and clear benefits adjuncts gain from having access to professional development opportunities. In spite of a shortage of resources, there are institutions offering development programs that target the pressing needs of this population. The first part of the book features the voices of adjunct faculty who tell their stories of finding professional development and creating or connecting with communities of colleagues for mutual support. These adjunct voices represent a range of disciplinary perspectives, career stages, and institutional types. In the second section, the authors draw upon a benchmarking study of adjunct faculty developing programs, examine specific challenges and highlight successful practices. Institutions can support adjunct faculty through teaching academies and faculty learning communities; mentor programs; conference support; and adjunct faculty liaison positions. Topics discussed include: • Best professional development practices that support and benefit adjunct faculty • Faculty social isolation and community-building opportunities • An overview of changes affecting the academic workforce • An outline of issues and working conditions • Current demographics and types of adjunct faculty • Survey results from adjunct faculty developers • Adjunct faculty narratives featuring their professional development and community experiences Teaching and Learning centers across the country are responding to the growing adjunct cohort in innovative and efficient ways. Administrators, deans, department chairs, and adjunct faculty will all benefit by hearing the voices of adjuncts as they express the challenges faced by adjunct faculty and the types of professional development opportunities which are most beneficial.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 371 3 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 372 0 / $25.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 374 4 / $19.99
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Authoring Your Life
Developing Your INTERNAL VOICE to Navigate Life’s Challenges
Illustrated by Matthew Henry Hall
Foreword by Sharon Daloz Parks
Who am I? What do I want in relationships? How do I know what to believe? How do I manage the stresses of living? This is a guide to addressing life’s challenges and competing demands. It will help you to reflect on the problems and setbacks you encounter to discover your own voice, uncover your authentic sense of values, build your confidence, and find meaning in your life. This is, however, far more than a self-help book; and it addresses multiple audiences. Because everyone’s circumstances differ, and life is unpredictable, this book does not offer simplistic solutions and steps to follow. Instead, Marcia Baxter Magolda immerses you in the stories of thirty-five adults whom she has followed and interviewed for over twenty years. With her guidance, and using the self-authorship framework she has developed, you will recognize in yourself many patterns and parallels from the protagonists’ stories of emotional and intellectual growth. By reflecting on these life stories, you will gain insights about your individual values and identity, and strengthen your sense of self-reliance to handle significant transitions and unexpected circumstances. In addition to helping you identify the phases of your journey to self-authorship, Marcia Baxter Magolda offers reflective exercises and questions to help you uncover your strengths and identify the barriers that may be inhibiting you from building the internal, psychological compass that will serve as the foundation for your journey. Offering advice on how to be “good company” for those who have set out on their journey to self-authorship, the book is also addressed to partners, family members, friends, teachers, mentors, and employers, so they can offer support to those that face these challenges. Finally, for scholars of adult development, this book offers the latest articulation of the developing theory of self-authorship.

Paper: 978 1 57922 272 7 / $22.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 700 1 / $17.99
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The Coach's Guide for Women Professors
Who Want a Successful Career and a Well-Balanced Life
Foreword by Frances Rosenbluth
If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, this is a book you need to pick up. I know or suspect that I am underpaid, but I hate negotiating. I do everything else first and then write in the time left over. I’m not sure exactly what the promotion requirements are in my department. Since earning tenure, my service load has increased and my research is suffering. I don’t get enough time with my family. This is a practical guide for women in academe – whether adjuncts, professors or administrators – who often encounter barriers and hostility, especially women of color, and generally carry a heavier load of service, as well as household and care responsibilities, than their male colleagues. Rena Seltzer, a respected life coach and trainer who has worked with women professors and academic leaders for many years, offers succinct advice on how you can prioritize the multiplicity of demands on your life, negotiate better, create support networks, and move your career forward. Using telling but disguised vignettes of the experiences of women she has mentored, Rena Seltzer offers insights and strategies for managing the situations that all women face – such as challenges to their authority – while also paying attention to how they often play out differently for Latinas, Black and Asian women. She covers issues that arise from early career to senior administrator positions. This is a book you can read cover to cover or dip into as you encounter concerns about time management; your authority and influence; work/life balance; problems with teaching; leadership; negotiating better; finding time to write; developing your networks and social support; or navigating tenure and promotion and your career beyond.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 895 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 896 5 / $19.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 898 9 / $15.99
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The Community Engagement Professional's Guidebook
A Companion to The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education
Foreword by Andrew J. Seligsohn
This book is a companion guide to Campus Compact’s successful publication The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education. In the first text, Campus Compact Research Fellows - led by award-winning scholar-practitioner Lina D. Dostilio - identified a core of set of competencies needed by professionals charged with leading community engaged work on college campuses. In this companion guide, Dostilio teams up with Marshall Welch to build on the initial framework by offering guidance for how a community engagement professional (CEP) should conceptualize, understand, and develop their practice in each of the original competency areas. Over 10 chapters the authors address questions for those “brand new to the role” and interested in how to start a community engagement unit or center, or from people who are considering jobs doing the work on a campus, or from individuals “are trying to navigate the political environment on their campuses to expand and deepen their unit’s reach.” The Guidebook offers a rich and deep dive, breaking down the essential components of a professional’s work. From mentoring faculty research, leading campaigns to build civic engagement curriculum on campus, to managing the staff who support community engagement units, Dostilio and Welch tackle the breadth of the CEP’s work by drawing on key resources and their own decades of experience in the field. Throughout the book, readers will encounter “Compass Points” that call for personal reflection and engagement with the text. These interactive moments combine with end-of-chapter questions to prompt thinking about a CEP’s critical commitments, to create a powerful and engaging toolkit that will be essential for any person doing community and civic engagement work on campus.

Cloth: 978 1 945459 17 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 945459 18 4 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 945459 20 7 / $31.99
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Contingent Academic Labor
Evaluating Conditions to Improve Student Outcomes
Foreword by Adrianna Kezar
Contingent Academic Labor is a concise guide that offers higher education professionals a way to measure the degree of equality taking place in work environments for non-tenure track faculty across institutional settings. It frames the relevant issues and examines the nationwide situation facing contingent faculty across the professional landscape. The goal is to review contingent faculty treatment, and offer a standardized way to identify both equitable and unjust practices that impact adjunct faculty and their students by extension. The main feature of this guide is The Contingent Labor Conditions Score, a tool to help evaluate current labor practices that impact adjuncts in both positive and negative ways. The report card measures 3 areas of labor conditions: *Material Equity: Pay, job security and benefits *Professional Equity: Opportunities for advancement, professional development, academic freedom, sense of professional inclusion, and job satisfaction *Social Equity: Gender and race parity between contingent and non-contingent faculty in proportion to the population served This book will be useful for administrators and labor organizers alike in assessing the degree of exploitation, or empowerment, in their own institution. The Contingent Labor Conditions Score, as a standardized tool, will serve audiences on both sides of the discussion in creating positive steps forward, improving not only contingent faculty working conditions, but ultimately improving student outcomes.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 251 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 252 5 / $19.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 254 9 / $15.99
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Creating a Service Culture in Higher Education Administration
Service delivery is part and parcel of every higher education professional’s job, both to improve service to students and to each other as “internal customers”. Until now higher education professionals have had to rely, for their professional development, on books and training designed for the business sector. This book is the first to specifically address the needs of higher education professionals across a wide range of administrative functions within college and university environments. It is designed for administrative staff and management, ranging from professionals working in centralized functions such as student affairs and enrollment management to those working as advisors or in career centers, whether in community colleges, four-year institutions, or for-profit institutions. Each chapter applies customer service principles to scenarios that are relevant to higher education. The book begins by engaging the reader to define service and identify the external and internal customers who are recipients of that service. It then maps customer interactions into a series of steps and offers departments and individuals a tool to maximize the customer experience. Additional chapters address customer expectations, creating a service culture on your campus, and managerial influences on staff service delivery. Creating a Service Culture in Higher Education Administration is a complementary book to the online customer service and management training resources at softskillspros.com.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 004 0 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 005 7 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 007 1 / $19.99
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Creating Engaging Discussions
Strategies for "Avoiding Crickets" in Any Size Classroom and Online
If you have ever been apprehensive about initiating classroom discussion, fearing silences, the domination of a couple of speakers, superficial contributions, or off-topic remarks, this book provides strategies for creating a positive learning experience. Jennifer H. Herman and Linda B. Nilson demonstrate how to create the conditions to facilitate deep and meaningful learning as well as to assess the effectiveness of discussions. They identify, analyze, and solve common problems in both classroom and online discussions and in both small and large classes. They take a direct, practice-oriented approach that--in acknowledging common challenges--provides principles, guidance on design, examples of activities and techniques, and eight detailed case studies. These cases demonstrate successful approaches that faculty across disciplines and from a variety of institutions have adopted in their face-to-face, blended, or online courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. The case authors begin by describing the original pedagogical challenge they faced and explain how they addressed it and assessed the results of their innovation. They also offer practical recommendations to readers who may want to try their strategies. Intended for faculty, this book will be equally valuable for educational developers who can use this resource in their programs and private consultations. At the graduate level, this book can serve as a text or workshop resource in college teaching courses and teaching assistant development programs. The final chapter provides a set of resources and activities – including discussion questions on the case studies, writing prompts, and jigsaw formats – that are equally appropriate for individual study or for use in workshop environments. You’ll never again have to suffer such a profound silence that, as described by a contributor to the book, she could hear the crickets chirping outside.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 559 5 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 560 1 / $27.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 562 5 / $21.99
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A Day in the Life of a Student Affairs Educator
Competencies and Case Studies for Early-Career Professionals
Foreword by Susan R. Komives
This book constitutes a collection of case studies that explore issues faced by new professionals in student affairs, with the scenarios designed to develop ACPA/NASPA Professional Competencies. These cases provide opportunities to create meaningful learning experiences for courses, training programs, and the mentoring of new professionals, giving them exposure to the kinds of dilemmas they will encounter as they assume their leadership roles or start out on supervisory positions. The cases are derived from interviews with current student affairs professionals, are based on real life dilemmas, reflect contemporary issues on our college campuses, and are designed to be easily used or adapted across all institutional types. The cases cover the areas of advising and helping; assessment, evaluation and research; equity, diversity, and inclusion; ethical professional practice; history, values, and philosophy; human and organizational resources; law, policy, and governance; leadership; personal foundations; and student learning and development, and vary in length to allow for multiple uses. Shorter cases can be role-played and discussed in leadership training workshops, while longer cases can be used as take-home assignments or debated during longer training sessions. The book begins with advice on how to use the cases and concludes with general advice provided by current professionals in the field.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 308 3 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 309 0 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 212 9 / $23.99
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The Elective Carnegie Community Engagement Classification
Constructing a Successful Application for First-Time and Re-Classification Applicants
The Carnegie Engagement Classification is designed to be a form of evidence-based documentation that a campus meets the criteria to be recognized as a community engaged institution. Editors John Saltmarsh and Mathew B. Johnson use their extensive experience working with the Carnegie Engagement Classification to offer a collection of resources for institutions that are interested in making a first-time or reclassification application for this recognition. Contributors offer insight on approaches to collecting the materials needed for an application and strategies for creating a complete and successful application. Chapters include detailed descriptions of what happened on campuses that succeeded in their application attempts and even reflection from a campus that failed on their first application. Readers can make use of worksheets at the end of each chapter to organize their own classification efforts.

Cloth: 978 1 945459 13 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 945459 14 6 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 945459 16 0 / $31.99
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Envisioning Public Scholarship for Our Time
Models for Higher Education Researchers
Foreword by Lorelle L. Espinosa
This book proposes a new paradigm of public scholarship for our time, one that shifts from the notion of the public intellectual to the model of the engaged scholar. The editors’ premise is that the work of public scholarship should be driven by a commitment to supporting a diverse democracy and promoting equity and social justice. The contributors to this volume present models that eschew the top-down framing of policy to advocate for practice that drives bottom-up change by arming the widest range of stakeholders -- especially members of marginalized communities -- with relevant research. They demonstrate how public scholarship in higher education can increase its impact on practice and policy and compellingly argue that public scholarship should be recognized as normative practice for all scholars and indeed integrated into the curriculum of graduate courses. The chapters describe multiple types of public scholarship and different strategies that move beyond informing policymakers, faculty, and administrators to engage publics such as students and parents, media, the general public, and particularly groups that may have had little or no access to research. Examples include partnering with a community agency to design a research project and disseminate results; writing for practitioner or policy venues and magazines outside the traditional academic journals; serving on boards for national groups that impact decisions related to your area of research; and the use of social media. Whether scholar, director of graduate education, or graduate student of higher education, this book opens up a new vision of how research can inform practice that promotes the public good.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 775 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 776 6 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 778 0 / $25.99
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Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence
Current Practices, Future Imperatives
The first decade of the 21st century brought major challenges to higher education, all of which have implications for and impact the future of faculty professional development. This volume provides the field with an important snapshot of faculty development structures, priorities and practices in a period of change, and uses the collective wisdom of those engaged with teaching, learning, and faculty development centers and programs to identify important new directions for practice. Building on their previous study of a decade ago, published under the title of Creating the Future of Faculty Development, the authors explore questions of professional preparation and pathways, programmatic priorities, collaboration, and assessment. Since the publication of this earlier study, the pressures on faculty development have only escalated—demands for greater accountability from regional and disciplinary accreditors, fiscal constraints, increasing diversity in types of faculty appointments, and expansion of new technologies for research and teaching. Centers have been asked to address a wider range of institutional issues and priorities based on these challenges. How have they responded and what strategies should centers be considering? These are the questions this book addresses. For this new study the authors re-surveyed faculty developers on perceived priorities for the field as well as practices and services offered. They also examined more deeply than the earlier study the organization of faculty development, including characteristics of directors; operating budgets and staffing levels of centers; and patterns of collaboration, re-organization and consolidation. In doing so they elicited information on centers’ “signature programs,” and the ways that they assess the impact of their programs on teaching and learning and other key outcomes. What emerges from the findings are what the authors term a new Age of Evidence, influenced by heightened stakeholder interest in the outcomes of undergraduate education and characterized by a focus on assessing the impact of instruction on student learning, of academic programs on student success, and of faculty development in institutional mission priorities. Faculty developers are responding to institutional needs for assessment, at the same time as they are being asked to address a wider range of institutional priorities in areas such as blended and online teaching, diversity, and the scale-up of evidence-based practices. They face the need to broaden their audiences, and address the needs of part-time, non-tenure-track, and graduate student instructors as well as of pre-tenure and post-tenure faculty. They are also feeling increased pressure to demonstrate the “return on investment” of their programs. This book describes how these faculty development and institutional needs and priorities are being addressed through linkages, collaborations, and networks across institutional units; and highlights the increasing role of faculty development professionals as organizational “change agents” at the department and institutional levels, serving as experts on the needs of faculty in larger organizational discussions.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 267 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 268 6 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 270 9 / $23.99
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Faculty Retirement
Best Practices for Navigating the Transition
Foreword by Lotte Bailyn
Co-published with ACE. This book addresses the critical and looming issue of retirement in higher education as the cohort of boomer generation faculty come to the close of their careers. On the one hand institutions need to replenish themselves, and so need older employees to retire. On the other, mass retirements can decimate departments, creating the need for mass hirings that will create another crisis in the future. At the same time, with the elimination of mandatory retirement, many faculty are working on into and beyond their seventies because they feel they still have much to contribute, because their identities are closely tied to their work, because they wish to remain connected to their institutions, or for financial reasons. Given institutions’ legal constraints and planning exigencies, and faculties’ varied motivations, what are the options that can satisfy the needs of both parties? This book presents a range of examples of how institutions of all types and sizes are addressing these dilemmas, and how faculty members have helped create or shape policies that address their needs and allow them to continue to play meaningful roles at their institutions. The contributors describe practices that address the concerns of those already nearing or in retirement, propose approaches to creating opportunities to start these sensitive discussions and address financial planning at early career stages, and outline strategies for developing clear structures and policies and communication so that individuals have a full understanding of their options as they make life-changing decisions. This book presents models from fifteen colleges and universities identified by the American Council on Education through a competition for having developed innovative and effective ways to help faculty transition into retirement. It offers clear messages about the need for greater transparency in addressing retirement and transitions, for better communication, and for close coordination between human resources and academic administrators. It offers a roadmap for HR personnel, senior administrators, department chairs, and faculty themselves.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 191 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 192 4 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 194 8 / $25.99
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Jump-Start Your Online Classroom
Mastering Five Challenges in Five Days
Every year, more online or technology-enhanced learning experiences are added to the landscape of education, and the number of students taking online courses on residential campuses continues to grow. In addition, new instructional tools are creating environments that are mobile, interactive, and collaborative. These trends present challenges to the online classroom, and this book will help instructors meet those challenges. Jump-Start Your Online Classroom prepares a first-time online instructor to successfully manage the first few weeks of a course, including activities to help instructors plan, manage, and facilitate online instruction; and provides resources helpful during the beginning weeks of class. Each chapter is developed around the immediate challenges instructors face when teaching online. The authors address everyday problems and suggest solutions informed by their extensive research and experience. The five challenges, which are designed to be addressed in five days, are to: • Make the transition to online teaching • Build online spaces for learning • Prepare students for online learning • Manage and facilitating the online classroom • Assess learner outcomes in an online classroom The book is based on the authors’ design and facilitation model that identifies five elements comprising an online learning environment: digital tools, participants, social practices, learning community, and outcomes. The book shows how each of those aspects influences instructional practices and interacts to create an environment for a meaningful online educational experience.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 580 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 581 6 / $22.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 583 0 / $17.99
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Learning to Collaborate, Collaborating to Learn
Engaging Students in the Classroom and Online
Foreword by Lynn A. Wilson
Students who know how to collaborate successfully in the classroom will be better prepared for professional success in a world where we are expected to work well with others. Students learn collaboratively, and acquire the skills needed to organize and complete collaborative work, when they participate in thoughtfully-designed learning activities. Learning to Collaborate, Collaborating to Learn uses the author’s Taxonomy of Online Collaboration to illustrate levels of progressively more complex and integrated collaborative activities. - Section I introduces the Taxonomy of Online Collaboration and offers theoretical and research foundations. - Section II focuses on ways to use Taxonomy of Online Collaboration, including, clarifying roles and developing trust, communicating effectively, organizing project tasks and systems. - Section III offers ways to design collaborative learning activities, assignments or projects, and ways to fairly assess participants’ performance. Learning to Collaborate, Collaborating to Learn is a professional guide intended for faculty, curriculum planners, or instructional designers who want to design, teach, facilitate, and assess collaborative learning. The book covers the use of information and communication technology tools by collaborative partners who may or may not be co-located. As such, the book will be appropriate for all-online, blended learning, or conventional classrooms that infuse technology with “flipped” instructional techniques.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 804 6 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 805 3 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 807 7 / $23.99
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Making Global Learning Universal
Promoting Inclusion and Success for All Students
Foreword by Caryn McTighe Musil
Co-published with NAFSA. While there is wide consensus in higher education that global learning is essential for all students’ success, there are few models of how to achieve this goal. The authors of this book, all of whom are from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse research universities, provide such a model and, in doing so, offer readers a broad definition of global learning that both encompasses a wide variety of modes and experiences—in-person, online, and in co-curricular activities at home and abroad—and engages all students on campus. They provide a replicable set of strategies that embed global learning throughout the curriculum and facilitate high quality, high-impact global learning for all students. The approach this book describes is based upon three principles: that global learning is a process to be experienced, not a thing to be produced; that it requires all students’ participation—particularly the underrepresented—and cannot succeed if reserved for a select few; and that global learning involves more than mastery of a particular body of knowledge. The authors conceptualize global learning as the process of diverse people collaboratively analyzing and addressing complex problems that transcend borders of all kinds. They demonstrate how institutions can enable all students to determine relationships among diverse perspectives on problems and develop equitable, sustainable solutions for the world’s interconnected human and natural communities. What’s more, they describe how a leadership process—collective impact—can enable all stakeholders across departments and disciplines to align and integrate universal global learning throughout the institution and achieve the aims of inclusive excellence. Providing examples of practice, this book: • Offers a model to make global learning universal; • Provides a definition of global learning that incorporates diversity, collaboration, and problem solving as essential components; • Describes effective leadership for implementation consistent with the attributes of global learning; • Illustrates integrative, high-impact global learning strategies within the access pipeline, students’ coursework, and co-curricular activities; • Offers practical strategies for global learning professional development, student learning assessment, and program evaluation; • Promotes inclusive excellence through universal global learning.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 359 1 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 360 7 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 362 1 / $25.99
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Managing Your Professional Identity Online
A Guide for Faculty, Staff, and Administrators
Foreword by Laura Pasquini
In higher education, professional online identities have become increasingly important. A rightly worded tweet can cause an academic blog post to go viral. A wrongly worded tweet can get a professor fired. Regular news items in The Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed provide evidence that reputations are both built and crushed via online platforms. Ironically, given the importance of digital identities to job searches, the promotion and distribution of scholarly work, pedagogical innovation, and many other components of an academic life, higher education professionals receive little to no training about how to best represent themselves in a digital space. Managing Your Professional Identity Online: A Guide for Higher Education fills this gap by offering higher education professionals the information and guidance they need to: - craft strong online biographical statements for a range of platforms; - prioritize where and how they want to represent themselves online in a professional capacity; - intentionally and purposefully create an effective brand for their professional identity online; - develop online profiles that are consistent, professional, accurate, organized, of good quality, and representative of their academic lives; - regularly update and maintain an online presence; - post appropriately in a range of online platforms and environments; and - successfully promote their professional accomplishments. Managing Your Professional Identity Online is practical and action-oriented. In addition to offering a range of case studies demonstrating concrete examples of effective practices, the book is built around activities, templates, worksheets, rubrics, and bonus materials that walk readers through a step-by-step guide of how to design, build, and maintain professional online identities.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 668 4 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 669 1 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 671 4 / $23.99
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Meaningful and Manageable Program Assessment
A How-To Guide for Higher Education Faculty
In this book, the authors provide readers with a straightforward approach to doing assessment in a way that is meaningful, manageable, and sustainable over time. Including a straightforward overview of assessment concepts and principles and practical, easy-to-follow instructions for multiple assessment tools and key steps in the assessment process, this book is a handy, all-in-one how-to guide. In addition, the text guides readers toward the development of a culture of assessment. Writing in a conversational tone that has helped the authors to successfully teach assessment principles and practices to faculty and administrators from a variety of academic disciplines and institutions, the book reads as if a friendly, supportive assessment professional is by your side. The book begins with an overview of the assessment process and key assessment concepts and principles. Subsequent modules provide detailed instructions and specific tips for carrying out each step of the process, including three modules focused on creating and implementing specific assessment measurement tools. The authors recommend readers begin by reading Module 1, which provides a framework that will enhance understanding of each of the steps of the process that are spelled out in detail in subsequent modules. However, after that, each of the modules is designed to stand alone. Readers need not read the modules in order nor do they need to read all of them in order to benefit from the authors’ guidance. In addition, the authors have created a video to accompany Module 10 in which they take readers step-by-step through the use of Excel spreadsheets to organize and present assessment data.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 563 2 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 564 9 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 566 3 / $23.99
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Pitch Perfect
Communicating with Traditional and Social Media for Scholars, Researchers, and Academic Leaders
Foreword by Robert Zemsky
This book is intended for scholars, researchers, and academic leaders who have a passion to share their knowledge outside their classroom, laboratory, or institution; who want to make a difference; and who believe that the information they possess and ideas they offer are important for a wider public. Pitch Perfect is a practical guide to communicating your knowledge and research to broader audiences. How do you get yourself heard amid the volume of news and information in today’s 24-hour news cycle, and get your message across in an environment where blogs and Twitter vie with traditional media? To break through, you need to amplify your ideas and make them relevant for a wider public audience. Bill Tyson – who has been successfully advising scholars and academic leaders on media relations for over 30 years – shows you how to undertake early and thoughtful communications planning, understand the needs and workings of the media, both traditional and digital, and tell your story in a way that will capture your audience. Bill Tyson is strategic in his advice, no less so when discussing how to engage with such social media as blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, podcasts or wikis. Whether you are working on research or a new initiative that has public implications, or have a story that deserves wide telling; whether you want to address funders’ requests for communications plans to promote the programs they are supporting, or whether you want to know how to publicize your new book; this practical guide offers insider advice – complete with case studies – on how to communicate your message. An appendix lists key media in North America, Australia, and the UK.

Paper: 978 1 57922 333 5 / $24.00
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 546 9 / $18.99
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POGIL
An Introduction to Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning for Those Who Wish to Empower Learners
Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a pedagogy that is based on research on how people learn and has been shown to lead to better student outcomes in many contexts and in a variety of academic disciplines. Beyond facilitating students’ mastery of a discipline, it promotes vital educational outcomes such as communication skills and critical thinking. Its active international community of practitioners provides accessible educational development and support for anyone developing related courses. Having started as a process developed by a group of chemistry professors focused on helping their students better grasp the concepts of general chemistry, The POGIL Project has grown into a dynamic organization of committed instructors who help each other transform classrooms and improve student success, develop curricular materials to assist this process, conduct research expanding what is known about learning and teaching, and provide professional development and collegiality from elementary teachers to college professors. As a pedagogy it has been shown to be effective in a variety of content areas and at different educational levels. This is an introduction to the process and the community. Every POGIL classroom is different and is a reflection of the uniqueness of the particular context – the institution, department, physical space, student body, and instructor – but follows a common structure in which students work cooperatively in self-managed small groups of three or four. The group work is focused on activities that are carefully designed and scaffolded to enable students to develop important concepts or to deepen and refine their understanding of those ideas or concepts for themselves, based entirely on data provided in class, not on prior reading of the textbook or other introduction to the topic. The learning environment is structured to support the development of process skills –– such as teamwork, effective communication, information processing, problem solving, and critical thinking. The instructor’s role is to facilitate the development of student concepts and process skills, not to simply deliver content to the students. The first part of this book introduces the theoretical and philosophical foundations of POGIL pedagogy and summarizes the literature demonstrating its efficacy. The second part of the book focusses on implementing POGIL, covering the formation and effective management of student teams, offering guidance on the selection and writing of POGIL activities, as well as on facilitation, teaching large classes, and assessment. The book concludes with examples of implementation in STEM and non-STEM disciplines as well as guidance on how to get started. Appendices provide additional resources and information about The POGIL Project.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 543 4 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 544 1 / $37.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 546 5 / $30.99
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The Prudent Professor
Planning and Saving for a Worry-Free Retirement from Academe
This is a guide for anyone in the academy – faculty member, administrator or professional staff – at whatever point she or he may be along the career path. Whether you are a newly-minted Ph.D. landing your first job, at mid career, or even already retired and concerned about how long your money might last, Ed Bridges offers you a straightforward, easy-to-grasp, and structured way to think about money, learn how it works, understand the priorities for your stage in life, determine your objectives, and develop a personal plan most likely to achieve them. Why a book specifically for those who work in higher education? The chances are that your retirement funds are mostly invested in TIAA-CREF funds, and that the plans created by the different institutions where you have worked, or will work, impose sometimes conflicting limitations of how you can manage your retirement money. This is potentially complex terrain with which many professional financial advisors are unfamiliar. This book provides ample guidance for you to manage your retirement funds, but if you do prefer to seek professional advice, it sets out the criteria for choosing a reliable advisor, and may even be a book from which your advisor can benefit if he or she is not fully conversant with TIAA-CREF’s offerings, and the quirks of academic retirement plans. What makes this book unique is that Ed Bridges shares with you his self-education about the risky business of investing and retirement planning. As he writes, “In schooling myself, I adopted the mind-set that I had used as a social scientist for the past forty-six years. I distinguished between fact and opinion and scrutinized the evidence behind every author’s claims; moreover, I searched for research that might corroborate or refute these claims. In the process, I learned a great deal about the route I should have taken to retirement from the time I accepted my first academic appointment to the time I submitted my intention to retire. Join me as I relive my long journey so that you may avoid my wrong turns and succeed in reaching your ultimate destination, a worry-free retirement, despite the risks and uncertainties you will surely face when you retire.” The book includes simple questionnaires and worksheets to help you determine where you stand, and think through your options.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 467 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 468 4 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 550 6 / $23.99
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Reconceptualizing Faculty Development in Service-Learning/Community Engagement
Exploring Intersections, Frameworks, and Models of Practice
Foreword by L. Dee Fink
The role of educational developer in the realm of service-learning and community engagement (S-LCE) is multidimensional. Given the potentially transformational nature--for both faculty and students--of the experiences and courses in whose design they may be directly or indirectly involved, as well as their responsibility to the communities served by these initiatives, they have to be particularly attentive to issues of identity, values, and roles. As both practitioners and facilitators, they are often positioned as third-space professionals. This edited volume provides educational developers and community engagement professionals an analysis of approaches to faculty development around service-learning and community engagement. Using an openly self-reflective approach, the contributors to this volume offer an array of examples and models, as well as realistic strategies, to empower readers to evolve their faculty development efforts in service-learning and community engagement on their respective campuses. It is also a call for recognition that the practice of S-LCE needs to be institutionalized and improved. The book further addresses the field’s potential contributions to scholarship, such as the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), publically engaged scholarship, and collaborative inquiry, among others. The case studies provide an outline of program models and promising practices, including an authentic analysis of the institutional context within which they operate, the positionality of the practitioner-scholars overseeing them, the resources required, and the evidence related to both successes and challenges of these approaches. The contributed chapters are organized under four themes: the landscape of faculty development and community engagement; models of faculty development in S-LCE; challenges and opportunities in pedagogy and partnerships; and engendering change in educational development.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 612 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 613 4 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 615 8 / $27.99
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Shaping Your Career
A Guide for Early Career Faculty
Foreword by Ann E. Austin
Going beyond providing you with the tools, strategies, and approaches that you need to navigate the complexity of academic life, Don Haviland, Anna Ortiz, and Laura Henriques offer an empowering framework for taking ownership of and becoming an active agent in shaping your career. This book recognizes, as its point of departure, that faculty are rarely prepared for the range of roles they need to play or the varied institutions in which they may work, let alone understand how to navigate institutional context, manage the politics of academe, develop positive professional relationships, align individual goals with institutional expectations, or possess the time management skills to juggle the conflicting demands on their time. The book is infused by the authors’ love for what they do while also recognizing the challenging nature of their work. In demonstrating how you can manage your career, they weave in the personal and institutional dimensions of their experience and offer vignettes from their longitudinal study of pre-tenure faculty to illustrate typical issues you may have to contend with, and normalize many of the concerns you may face as a new member of the academy. This book offers you: • The resources, tips, and strategies to develop a strong, healthy career as a faculty member • Empowerment— you take ownership of and become an active agent in shaping your career • Advice and strategies to help women and members of traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic groups navigate institutional structures that affect them differently • An understanding of the changing nature of academic work, and of how to grow and succeed in this new environment While explicitly addressed to early career faculty, this book’s message of empowerment is of equal utility for full-time faculty, both tenure-track and non-tenure track, and can usefully serve as a text for graduate courses. Department chairs, deans, and faculty developers will find it a useful resource to offer their new colleagues.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 443 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 444 4 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 446 8 / $23.99
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SoTL in Action
Illuminating Critical Moments of Practice
Edited by Nancy L. Chick
Foreword by James Rhem
What are the foundational moments of meaningful scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) projects? How do teacher-scholars collect, develop, and share useful insights about student learning? How do they work through the pinch points that frustrate, confuse, or elude many SoTL practitioners? By unpacking SoTL processes through rich narratives that illustrate what they look like, this collection offers inspiration to anyone at any stage of engagement with SoTL. This book takes discussions of SoTL to a new level. Its subtitle reflects the microscopic lenses SoTL processes can apply to student learning experiences to understand how they happen, what they look like, what they mean, and what we can do about them. Going beyond definitions, how-to, theory, and debates about methods and standards, the contributors offer a SoTL primer documenting how practitioners have intentionally thought through key moments in their work. These procedural vignettes present powerful examples of what doing SoTL looks like when done well. The authors represent a range of disciplines (the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and professions) and a mixture of familiar and unfamiliar names. Nancy Chick has selected contributions that compellingly illuminate why their authors focused on a particular critical moment, the questions they asked as they refined their approaches, and the theoretical and observational tools they employed to conduct their research. Each introduces a specific critical moment in doing SoTL, taking the reader through the author’s reflections, concerns, and choices in doing meaningful SoTL work. The aim is to support potential practitioners, inform educational developers who teach new SoTL practitioners, and inspire experienced SoTL scholars to reflect on their own practice. This is a compelling collection for anyone interested in practitioner reflection, intentional design, and advancing the field of SoTL and the quality of teaching and learning.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 692 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 693 6 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 695 0 / $25.99
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The Strategic Guide to Shaping Your Student Affairs Career
This is a book for any student affairs professional who wants to strategically shape his or her career path—and will be particularly helpful for people in early or mid-career, or contemplating a career, in student affairs. By engagingly offering us the fruits of the reflective and strategic approach she has used to shape her own career, and of the theoretical and practical approaches she has undertaken to map out the culture and dynamics of student affairs, and by gathering the voices of 25 professionals who offer the insights and advice derived from their own experiences, Sonja Ardoin has created a guide for everyone in student affairs who wants to be intentional in setting the course for their professional and personal development. She begins by describing the changing and varied student populations who are the heart of this field, and outlines the typical organizational structures of student affairs, the range of functional areas, and how practice varies by size and type of institution. She highlights major trends, discusses the typical paths of entry to the profession, the expectations and realities of starting in a new position, the process of socialization, and the required skills and competencies. She devotes the core of the book to the five key elements for developing a career strategy: Lifelong Learning, Extending Your Experiences, Planning for Professional Development, Networking/Connecting, and Self-Reflection, and provides advice on the job search, from application through interview. In doing so she ranges over choices to be made about formal qualifications, and describes activities – from volunteering and committee work to conference presentations, writing and teaching – that we can use to strategically develop the proficiencies to attain our goals.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 957 3 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 958 0 / $26.00
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 960 3 / $19.99
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Student Affairs by the Numbers
Quantitative Research and Statistics for Professionals
Student Affairs by the Numbers aims to be the go-to book for student affairs professionals who want to know the basics of quantitative research and statistics for their work. Books on assessment in student affairs tend to discuss processes more than research design and statistics. Most books on statistics share too much information for practitioners, overwhelming them and making it difficult to discern what they need to know. Since these books do not use examples from student affairs, it is even more difficult for practitioners to connect with new concepts. Student Affairs professionals need to know how to design a study, collect data, analyze data, interpret results, and present the results in an understandable manner. This book will begin by establishing the need for these skills in student affairs and then quickly move to how to develop a research culture, how to conduct research, how to understand statistics, and concluding with how to change our research/assessment behaviors in order to make higher education better for students.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 451 2 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 452 9 / $32.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 454 3 / $25.60
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Success After Tenure
Supporting Mid-Career Faculty
This book brings together leading practitioners and scholars engaged in professional development programming for and research on mid-career faculty members. The chapters focus on key areas of career development and advancement that can enhance both individual growth and institutional change to better support mid-career faculties. The mid-career stage is the longest segment of the faculty career and it contains the largest cohort of faculty. Also, mid-career faculty are tasked with being the next generation of faculty leaders and mentors on their respective campuses, with little to no supports to do so effectively, at a time when higher education continues to face unprecedented challenges while managing continued goal of diversifying both the student and faculty bodies. The stories, examples, data, and resources shared in this book will provide inspiration--and reality checks--to the administrators, faculty developers, and department chairs charged with better supporting their faculties as they engage in academic work. Current and prospective faculty members will learn about trends in mid-career faculty development resources, see examples of how to create such supports when they are lacking on their campuses, and gain insights on how to strategically advance their own careers based on the realities of the professoriate. The book features a variety of institution types: community colleges, regional/comprehensive institutions, liberal arts colleges, public research universities, ivy league institutions, international institutions, and those with targeted missions such as HSI/MSI and Jesuit. Topics include faculty development for formal and informal leadership roles; strategies to support professional growth, renewal, time and people management; teaching and learning as a form of scholarship; the role of learning communities and networks as a source of support and professional revitalization; global engagement to support scholarship and teaching; strategies to recruit, retain, and promote underrepresented faculty populations; the policy-practice connection; and gender differences related to key mid-career outcomes. While the authors acknowledge that the challenges facing the mid-career stage are numerous and varying, they offer a counter narrative by looking at ways that faculty and/or institutions can assert themselves to find opportunities within challenging contexts. They suggest that these challenges highlight priority mentoring areas, and support the creation of new and innovative faculty development supports at institutional, departmental, and individual levels.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 680 6 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 681 3 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 683 7 / $27.99
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Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters!
Fostering Student Success Through Faculty-Centered Practice Improvement
Foreword by Rosemary Arca
“College teaching is not rocket science – it’s much, much harder.” Diana Laurillard, University of London College faculty, both adjunct and full-time, stand with their students at the coalface of learning, wishing for more to succeed and disappointed at how illusory academic success is for so many. Among the array of investments colleges are making to improve student outcomes, from predictive data analysis to enhanced advising, too little attention is paid to supporting faculty. Yet the impact of teacher and teaching on student learning is incontrovertible. Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters! stands against the tide – celebrating the incredible work faculty members do each day and challenging them to expand their capacity to present their content expertise effectively. This book presents a model of embedded professional development, which capitalizes on the affordances of technology to enable groups of faculty to examine their practice in a non-evaluative context, but with a clear focus on improvement. The core of the work involves individual reflection and the design provides for an accessible way to “see” into the classrooms of discipline peers. Most importantly, the Taking College Teaching Seriously experience is not an intense one-shot, but rather a structured opportunity for a faculty member to examine and adapt practice over time and to assess the impact of changes on student learning. Faculty who have participated in the Taking College Teaching Seriously experience found it to be transformative: • English Professor, Kentucky: Participating in (the work) this year has helped me to be more reflective in every single action. I constantly analyze how each session went… (it) gave me the tools to think about every minute detail of a classroom. • Adjunct Math Professor, Mississippi: Speaking as an adjunct, I have valued the chance to share my teaching and get ideas from others. I can honestly say that this experience has been a lifeline of sorts this year. In a “magic wand” instructional setting, I’d wish for the kind of honest, respectful and professionally challenging discussions we have in Classroom Notebook* at weekly staff meetings. *Classroom Notebook is the Taking College Teaching Seriously online platform • Math Professor, NJ: I think the continual self-evaluation and reflection allowed us to work together to brainstorm improvements and positive tweaks to be more purposeful in our classrooms as opposed to just randomly reaching in the dark for ideas and techniques in HOPE of success. Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters! breaks new ground in professional development. Each faculty member is at the center of the learning experience, stimulated and supported by peers working in similar contexts. They share a desire to see more students learn deeply and find that honing their skill at adapting to the learning needs of specific classes and students allows them to realize this goal. Uniquely, Taking College Teaching Seriously illuminates the link between faculty teaching expertise and improving student outcomes. The introduction to the book examines the challenges facing faculty in higher education today and reviews the literature on teaching and learning. Chapter 1 looks at the analytical foundations for all of the model’s elements, from adult learning theory to communities of practice, and Chapter 2 presents the model’s theory of change. Chapter 3 describes the model in detail and Chapters 4 and 5 concern the infrastructure of the faculty collaborative community, focusing on both its interpersonal and technological dimensions. The book concludes in Chapter 6 with an assessment of the value of this approach to professional development and a call to action for faculty member engagement in this important work, so essential to both professional passion and mandate.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 079 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 080 4 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 082 8 / $23.99
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What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School
299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
Illustrated by Matthew Henry Hall
• This irreverent, but serious guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips • Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career The 100 new hints expand sections on the dissertation process, job hunting, life in the classroom and on dealing with students, as well as on matters that affect readers’ careers, such as research, publication, and tenure. The book concludes with a tongue-in-cheek appendix on How to Become a Millionaire while an academic.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 643 5 / $70.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 644 2 / $19.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 646 6 / $15.99
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White Women Getting Real About Race
Their Stories About What They Learned Teaching in Diverse Classrooms
Foreword by Julie Landsman
For many White women teachers and teachers in training – who represent the majority of our teaching force today – the issue of race is fraught with discomfort. It may challenge assumptions, evoke a sense of guilt, or give rise to a fear of making mistakes or saying the wrong thing. This book presents the first-person stories of White women teachers who tell us not only how they have grappled with race in diverse classrooms, but how they continue to this day to be challenged by issues of color and privilege. These are no stories of heroic feats or achievement of perfection, but stories of self-disclosure that lay bare their authors’ emotions, ideas, curiosity, vulnerability, and reflections as they engaged with race, and challenged practices of color blindness and empathetic distance. Avoiding abstract educational lingo, these teachers come clean about the emotional cost of dealing with racism, White privilege, and fear of being racist in our rapidly diversifying schools. Admitting their cultural mistakes, they hope their readers can find a safe place to use theirs for honest dialogue and positive learning. In approaching chapter authors for this book, the editors asked the writers to ask themselves, “Will my well-being and sense of self be at risk if I tell this story?” Recognizing what’s at stake, they wanted writers who would be real with themselves. The women in this book hope that their stories will resonate with readers, help them feel less alone, and give them courage to begin a dialogue with colleagues, friends, staff and administrators around race concerns. Each chapter concludes with a few questions to prompt self-reflection at home, or for use as exercises to use in small groups or staff development training.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 457 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 458 5 / $26.00
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 910 8 / $20.99
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Write More, Publish More, Stress Less!
Five Key Principles for a Creative and Sustainable Scholarly Practice
In this book Dr. Dannelle D. Stevens offers five key principles that will bolster your knowledge of academic writing, enable you to develop a manageable, sustainable, and even enjoyable writing practice, and, in the process, effectively increase your publication output and promote your academic career. A successful and productive book and journal article author, writing coach, creator of a nationally-recognized, cross-disciplinary faculty writing program, and with a long career as a faculty member and experience as a department chair, Dr. Stevens offers a unique combination of motivation, reflective practices, analytical tools, templates, and advice to set you on the path to being a productive and creative writer. Drawing on her experience as a writer and on her extensive research into the psychology of writing and the craft of scholarly writing, Dr. Stevens starts from the premise that most faculty have never been taught to write and that writers, both experienced and novice, frequently experience anxiety and self-doubt that erode confidence. She begins by guiding readers to understand themselves as writers and discover what has impeded or stimulated them in the past to establish positive new attitudes and sustainable habits. Dr. Stevens provides strategies for setting doable goals, organizing a more productive writing life, and demonstrates the benefits of writing groups, including offering a variety of ways in which you can experiment with collaborative practice. In addition, she offers a series of reflections, exercises, and activities to spark your writing fluency and creativity. Whether developing journal articles, book chapters, book proposals, book reviews, or conference proposals, this book will help you demystify the hidden structures and common patterns in academic writing and help you match your manuscript to the language, structures, and conventions of your discipline--be it in the sciences, social sciences, or humanities. Most importantly, believing that connecting your passions with your work is essential to stimulating your ideas and enthusiasm, this essential guide offers you the knowledge and skills to write more.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 516 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 517 5 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 519 9 / $23.99
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