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CampusCompact - Student Leadership

Student Leadership

 
Assessing and Improving Student Organizations
A Guide for Students
This Assessing and Improving Student Organization (AISO) program is intended as a guide for leaders of student-led college organizations. It is designed to promote the assessment of their organization by leaders and members, help them with planning and improvement, and assist them in responding to reviews by governing bodies and national chapters. Apart from affording their members a structure for engaging with peers in activities of mutual interest, collegiate organizations provide them with hands-on opportunities for enhancing understanding of groups and organizations, and how they operate, and for acquiring and practicing the leadership, communication and collaborative skills that are so important for personal and professional effectiveness throughout life. This Guide provides you with a structure for analyzing the workings of your organization. It will generate insights to help you determine how effectively the organization is functioning, identify strengths and weaknesses, devise priorities and plans for future improvement, and in the process, promote your reflective learning. The AISO process constitutes an ideal laboratory to practice and refine your capabilities for analyzing and improving groups and organizations. Purpose and Elements of the AISO Program The Assessing and Improving Student Organization (AISO) program is intended as a guide for leaders of student-led college organizations. It is designed to promote the assessment of student organizations by their leaders and their members, to help them with planning and improvement, and assist them in responding to reviews by governing bodies and national chapters. Apart from affording their members a structure for engaging with peers in activities of mutual interest, collegiate organizations provide them with hands-on opportunities for enhancing understanding of groups and organizations, and how they operate, and for acquiring and practicing the leadership, communication and collaborative skills that are so important for personal and professional effectiveness throughout life. In addition, the AISO leadership process – unlike comparable programs – provides students with immediate and authentic feedback to evaluate their leadership, and how they impact their organization, community, and campus. The program consists of three elements: a Guide for Students, a Student Workbook, and a CD-ROM for facilitators. AISO has been developed under the auspices of NACA and ACPA by two authors who are experts in organizational and leadership development, student affairs, and human resources management. This is a unique, easy to use, and effective process that reflects input from student leaders. An ACPA Publication

Paper: 978 1 57922 413 4 / $14.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 492 9 / $11.99
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Assessing and Improving Student Organizations
Student Workbook
This Workbook is intended for student participants during the AISO assessment and planning sessions, and to be used in tandem with the Guide for Students. Each page presents an action or reflection slide from the Guide with a space below for participants to note their own ideas, outcomes of discussions, and items for action. The Workbook becomes a record of successive assessment and planning sessions, and a resource to refer back to during implementation. Purpose and Elements of the AISO Program The Assessing and Improving Student Organization (AISO) program is intended as a guide for leaders of student-led college organizations. It is designed to promote the self-assessment by both organizational leaders and their members, to help them with planning and improvement, and to assist them in responding to reviews by governing bodies and national chapters. Apart from affording their members a structure for engaging with peers in activities of mutual interest, collegiate organizations provide them with hands-on opportunities for enhancing understanding of groups and organizations, and how they operate, and for acquiring and practicing the leadership, communication and collaborative skills that are so important for personal and professional effectiveness throughout life. The program consists of three elements: a Guide for Students, a Student Workbook, and a CD-ROM for facilitators. AISO has been developed under the auspices of NACA and ACPA by two authors who are experts in organizational and leadership development, student affairs, and human resources management. This is a unique, easy to use, and effective process that reflects input from student leaders. An ACPA/NACA Publication

Paper: 978 1 57922 414 1 / $12.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 494 3 / $9.99
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Assessing and Improving Student Organizations
Resources for Facilitators CD-ROM
This companion to the Guide for Students and Student Workbook includes the complete set of PowerPoint slides, a PDF of the Facilitator’s Guide in PPT slide show format, and PDFs of all scoring sheets, handouts and project planning guides needed for the AISO process. Purpose and Elements of the AISO Program The Assessing and Improving Student Organization (AISO) program is intended as a guide for leaders of student-led college organizations. It is designed to promote the self-assessment by both organizational leaders and their members, to help them with planning and improvement, and to assist them in responding to reviews by governing bodies and national chapters. Apart from affording their members a structure for engaging with peers in activities of mutual interest, collegiate organizations provide them with hands-on opportunities for enhancing understanding of groups and organizations, and how they operate, and for acquiring and practicing the leadership, communication and collaborative skills that are so important for personal and professional effectiveness throughout life. The program consists of three elements: a Guide for Students, a Student Workbook, and a CD-ROM for facilitators. AISO has been developed under the auspices of NACA and ACPA by two authors who are experts in organizational and leadership development, student affairs, and human resources management. This is a unique, easy to use, and effective process that reflects input from student leaders. An ACPA/NACA Publication

CD-ROM: 978 1 57922 421 9 / $49.95
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A Day in the Life of a College Student Leader
Case Studies for Undergraduate Leaders
Foreword by Susan R. Komives
“Sarah Marshall and Anne Hornak have done a magnificent job exploring diverse contexts in which college students expand their individual leadership capacity and learn and practice engaging in relational leadership with others. These cases are realistic because they were gathered from their interviews with real students engaging in leadership. From whatever perspective, students can learn that they are doing leadership when they work with others to address shared issues, solve shared problems, and work toward positive change.”—from the Foreword by Susan R. Komives This book presents over 230 case studies that reflect typical issues faced by undergraduate student leaders. The scenarios cover the range of functional areas of student life. These cases are intended for use by faculty and student affairs professionals as training tools for new student leaders who generally receive little preparation before assuming their positions. Cases provide an opportunity for students to roleplay and discuss scenarios before they encounter potentially similar events in their daily lives as leaders; engage students intensely in their learning, as they work through the issues and problems; and promote meaningful dialogue and discussion of relevant theory. The cases are based on real life dilemmas, and reflect both contemporary and historical campus issues. They are derived from interviews with 110 undergraduates and 11 student affairs administrators from large public research institutions, small privates, community colleges, and mid-sized comprehensive schools. The book begins with guidance on how to use case studies effectively, and on how to incorporate theory in analyzing them. The cases are then grouped into chapters, each of which focuses on a particular type of student organization. The cases vary in length to allow for multiple uses. Shorter cases can be role played and discussed in leadership training workshops, while longer cases can be used as take home assignments or debated during longer training sessions. The book concludes with general advice for student leaders. To assist with the facilitation process, the authors provide discussion questions to begin the analysis of each case. The cases are written broadly enough to allow for a variety of possible solutions.

Paper: 978 1 57922 228 4 / $29.95
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Developing Effective Student Peer Mentoring Programs
A Practitioner's Guide to Program Design, Delivery, Evaluation, and Training
Foreword by Nora Domínguez
At a time when college completion is a major issue, and there is particular concern about the retention of underserved student populations, peer mentoring programs offer one solution to promoting student success. This is a comprehensive resource for creating, refining and sustaining effective student peer mentoring programs. While providing a blueprint for successfully designing programs for a wide range of audiences – from freshmen to doctoral students – it also offers specific guidance on developing programs targeting three large groups of under-served students: first-generation students, international students and student veterans. This guidebook is divided into two main sections. The opening section begins by reviewing the issue of degree non-completion, as well as college adjustment challenges that all students and those in each of the targeted groups face. Subsequent chapters in section one explore models of traditional and non-traditional student transition, persistence and belonging, address what peer mentoring can realistically achieve, and present a rubric for categorizing college student peer-mentoring programs. The final chapter in section one provides a detailed framework for assessing students’ adjustment issues to determine which ones peer mentoring programs can appropriately address. Section two of the guidebook shifts from the theoretical to the practical by covering the nuts and bolts of developing a college student peer-mentoring program. The initial chapter in section two covers a range of design issues including establishing a program timeline, developing a budget, securing funding, getting commitments from stakeholders, hiring staff, recruiting mentors and mentees, and developing policies and procedures. Subsequent chapters analyze the strengths and limitations of different program delivery options, from paired and group face-to-face mentoring to their e-mentoring equivalents; offer guidance on the creation of program content and resources for mentors and mentees, and provide mentor training exercises and curricular guidelines. Section two concludes by outlining processes for evaluating programs, including setting goals, collecting appropriate data, and methods of analysis; and by offering advice on sustaining and institutionalizing programs. Each chapter opens with a case study illustrating its principal points. This book is primarily intended as a resource for student affairs professionals and program coordinators who are developing new peer-mentoring programs or considering refining existing ones. It may also serve as a text in courses designed to train future peer mentors and leaders.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 075 0 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 076 7 / $37.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 078 1 / $29.99
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Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Bridging Differences, Catalyzing Change
Foreword by Patricia Gurin
Intergroup dialogue has emerged as an effective educational and community building method to bring together members of diverse social and cultural groups to engage in learning together so that they may work collectively and individually to promote greater diversity, equality and justice. Intergroup dialogues bring together individuals from different identity groups (such as people of color and white people; women and men; lesbian, gay, and bisexual people and heterosexual people), and uses explicit pedagogy that involves three important features: content learning, structured interaction, and facilitative guidance. The least understood role in the pedagogy is that of facilitation. This volume, the first dedicated entirely to intergroup dialogue facilitation, draws on the experiences of contributors and on emerging research to address the multi-dimensional role of facilitators and co-facilitators, the training and support of facilitators, and ways of improving practice in both educational and community settings. It constitutes a comprehensive guide for practitioners, covering the theoretical, conceptual, and practical knowledge they need. Presenting the work and insights of scholars, practitioners and scholar-practitioners who train facilitators for intergroup dialogues, this book bridges the theoretical and conceptual foundations of intergroup relations and social justice education with training models for intergroup dialogue facilitation. It is intended for staff, faculty, and administrators in higher education, and community agencies, as well as for human resources departments in workplaces. Contributors: Charles Behling, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Barry Checkoway, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, School of Social Work Mark Chesler, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Keri De Jong, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education Roger Fisher, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Nichola G. Fulmer Patricia Gurin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Tanya Kachwaha, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education Christina Kelleher, Institute for Sustained Dialogue, Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Ariel Kirkland, Occidental College, Student facilitator James Knauer, Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, Democracy Lab Joycelyn Landrum-Brown, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Program on Intergroup Relations Shaquanda D. Lindsey, Occidental College, Student facilitator David J. Martineau, Washington University, St. Louis, School of Social Work Kelly E. Maxwell Biren (Ratnesh) A. Nagda Teddy Nemeroff, Institute for Sustained Dialogue, Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Romina Pacheco, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education Priya Parker, Institute for Sustained Dialogue, Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Jaclyn Rodríguez, Occidental College, Department of Psychology Andrea C. Rodríguez-Scheel, Occidental College, Student facilitator Michael S. Spencer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, School of Social Work Monita C. Thompson Norma Timbang Thai Hung V. Tran Carolyn Vasques-Scalera, Independent Scholar Thomas E. Walker, University of Denver, Center for Multicultural Excellence Kathleen Wong (Lau), Arizona State University/Western Michigan University, Intergroup Relations Center/ Intercultural Communication Anna M. Yeakley, Independent Intergroup Dialogue Consultant Ximena Zúñiga, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education

Cloth: 978 1 57922 290 1 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 291 8 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 524 7 / $25.99
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Learning Through Serving
A Student Guidebook for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Across Academic Disciplines and Cultural Communities
This substantially expanded new edition of this widely-used and acclaimed text maintains the objectives and tenets of the first. It is designed to help students understand and reflect on their community service experiences both as individuals and as citizens of communities in need of their compassionate expertise. It is designed to assist faculty in facilitating student development of compassionate expertise through the context of service in applying disciplinary knowledge to community issues and challenges. In sum, the book is about how to make academic sense of civic service in preparing for roles as future citizen leaders. Each chapter has been developed to be read and reviewed, in sequence, over the term of a service-learning course. Students in a semester course might read just one chapter each week, while those in a quarter-term course might need to read one to two chapters per week. The chapters are intentionally short, averaging 8 to 14 pages, so they do not interfere with other course content reading. This edition presents four new chapters on Mentoring, Leadership, Becoming a Change Agent, and Short-Term Immersive and Global Service-Learning experiences. The authors have also revised the original chapters to more fully address issues of social justice, privilege/power, diversity, intercultural communication, and technology; have added more disciplinary examples; incorporated additional academic content for understanding service-learning issues (e.g., attribution theory); and cover issues related to students with disabilities, and international students. This text is a student-friendly, self-directed guide to service-learning that: • Develops the skills needed to succeed • Clearly links service-learning to the learning goals of the course • Combines self-study and peer-study workbook formats with activities that can be incorporated in class, to give teachers maximum flexibility in structuring their service-learning courses • Promotes independent and collaborative learning • Equally suitable for courses of a few weeks’ or a few months’ duration • Shows students how to assess progress and communicate end-results • Written for students participating in service learning as a class, but also suitable for students working individually on a project. Instructor's Manual This Instructor Manual discusses the following six key areas for aligning your course with use of Learning through Serving, whether you teach a senior-level high school class, freshman studies course, or a college capstone class: 1. Course and syllabus design 2. Community-partner collaboration 3. Creating class community 4. Strategic teaching techniques 5. Developing intercultural competence 6. Impact assessment This Manual is free, and available only in PDF format. Download here.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 989 4 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 990 0 / $27.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 992 4 / $21.99
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The New Student Politics
The Wingspread Statement on Student Civic Engagement
This report, which grew out of the 2001 Wingspread in Racine, Wisconsin, describes student political and civic engagement as defined by students at the Summit. One of the few available publications to give voice to students themselves, The New Student Politics examines contemporary conceptions of civic engagement, politics, and service and provides specific suggestions as to how campuses can improve their commitment to student civic engagement through service-learning, increased support for student political activity, and attentiveness to student voice.

Pamphlet: 978 99909 0 613 4 / $12.00
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Open Mic Night
Campus Programs that Champion College Student Voice and Engagement
While campuses across the United States have been offering spoken word programs for over 20 years, little attention has been paid to their purpose and impact beyond their contribution to the campus social aesthetic. There is an increasing understanding that performance poetry and spoken word is much more than entertainment. Within disciplines such as English, Ethnic, Women’s, and Cultural Studies, scholarship has identified spoken word’s role in developing political agency among young adults; its utility for promoting authentic youth voice; and its importance as a tool of cultural engagement. This book – compiled by scholar artists, including internationally recognized spoken word performers – offers guidance to student affairs professionals on using spoken word as a tool for college student engagement, activism, and civic awareness. It makes the case that campus event spaces need to transcend their association with the theatre or art departments to provide a venue where students are allowed to be different and find opportunities for personal and intellectual development, and civic engagement. Open mic nights offer college students a way to speak out, advocate, lead, educate, and explore with their peers. This book presents a mix of critical essays and college student writing that explore themes of spoken word, student engagement and campus inclusion, and address these key topics: • Spoken word as an educational, civic engagement, and personal development tool (particularly among traditionally marginalized communities) • The links between spoken word and social activism (art as social action; art as a form of civic leadership) • The importance of privileging student voice in student affairs programming (even when they yell; even when they’re angry) • The challenges that come with engaging students in exploring intersecting concepts like race, gender, class • Considerations for creative and intentional spoken word programming (What does a creative program look like?) • Scaling up for sustainability (through student affairs/academic affairs partnerships, study abroad collaborations, etc.)

Cloth: 978 1 62036 512 0 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 513 7 / $27.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 515 1 / $21.99
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Raise Your Voice
A Student Guide to Making Positive Social Change
This hands-on guide speaks directly to student leaders seeking to improve the effectiveness of their engaged work while enhancing their academic and civic learning. Based on three years of activity in Campus Compact's hugely successful Raise Your Voice civic action campaign, which mobilized hundreds of thousands of students across the country, this book is full of targeted strategies, tools, and activities for organizing change on campus. From holding civic dialogues to meeting with elected officials, from mapping assets and allies on campus to organizing alternative breaks, this book offers tips and step-by-step advice — from students, for students — for getting the most out of campus activity.

Paper: 978 0 9729394 6 1 / $37.00
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Students as Colleagues
Expanding the Circle of Service-Learning Leadership
This seminal volume takes service-learning to a new level by demonstrating how it can meet its academic and community goals while developing student leaders. Models from campuses across the country offer successful practices for recruiting and training student leaders in service-learning, using students to staff key administrative positions, and establishing student-faculty partnerships to design and run community-based courses. According to Campus Compact's member survey, nearly three-quarters of colleges and universities cite both student leadership development and student civic engagement as key outcomes in their strategic plans. Students as Colleagues is a must for anyone on campus seeking to achieve these institutional goals.

Paper: 978 0 9729394 5 4 / $35.00
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Working Side by Side
Creating Alternative Breaks as Catalysts for Global Learning, Student Leadership, and Social Change
Foreword by Tanya O. Williams
This book constitutes a guide for student and staff leaders in alternative break (and other community engagement, both domestic and international) programs, offering practical advice, outlining effective program components and practices, and presenting the underlying community engagement and global learning theory. Readers will gain practical skills for implementing each of the eight components of a quality alternative break program developed by Break Away, the national alternative break organization. The book advances the field of student-led alternative breaks by identifying the core components of successful programs that develop active citizens. It demonstrates how to address complex social issues, encourage structural analysis of societal inequities, foster volunteer transformation, and identify methods of work in mutually beneficial partnerships. It emphasizes the importance of integrating a justice-centered foundation throughout alternative break programs to complement direct service activities, and promotes long-term work for justice and student transformation by offering strategies for post-travel reorientation and continuing engagement. The authors address student leadership development, issue-focused education, questions of power, privilege, and diversity, and the challenges of working in reciprocal partnerships with community organizations. They offer guidance on fundraising, budget management, student recruitment, program structures, the nuts and bolts of planning a trip, risk management, health and safety, and assessment and evaluation. They address the complexities of international service-learning and developing partnerships with grassroots community groups, non-governmental and nonprofit organizations, and intermediary organizations. For new programs, this book provides a starting point and resource to return to with each stage of development. For established programs, it offers a theoretical framework to reflect on and renew practices for creating active citizens and working for justice.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 123 8 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 124 5 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 126 9 / $25.99
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