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Leadership & Administration

 
Academic Freedom without Tenure
Conceptualizes one or more procedures by which academic freedom could be uncoupled from academic tenure -- where some other means are offered to ensure the professoriate the unfettered opportunity to teach and conduct research; and explores the tradeoffs involved in doing so.

Paper: 978 1 56377 088 3 / $15.95
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Academic Leadership and Governance of Higher Education
A Guide for Trustees, Leaders, and Aspiring Leaders of Two- and Four-Year Institutions
Foreword by Stan Ikenberry
To meet the new and rapidly changing demands facing today’s higher education managers and leaders – from department chairs to trustees – this book offers guidance on how to effectively discharge their responsibilities and how to develop their skills for managing their relationships with internal and external stakeholders. It also provides a broad understanding of the structure and functions of their institution and of the appropriate loci of decision-making. The authors go beyond the “positions” of leadership to emphasize the qualities of creativity, commitment, collaboration, delegation and courage that are essential to steer a unit, college or university through successful and enduring change Recognizing that the hallmark of higher education in the United States is a diversity of institutional types, this book enables the reader to relate issues of environment, organization and management to his or her specific institution, from not only the presidential perspective, but from the vantage point of trustees, provosts, vice presidents, deans, and department heads. By covering all these functions—as well as the role of external stakeholders—in a single volume, this book offers readers a comprehensive view of how institutions respond to external forces and internal issues, and how these impact organizational structure, functions and decision-making in their roles, and the institution at large. The book is informed by these three essential principles: • Sound institutional decisions must be based on a clearly articulated mission and set of core values; • Successful institutional adaptation to a changed environment must be grounded and aligned with the fundamental mission and core values; and • Successful academic leaders must be able to create and foster partnerships, bringing diverse individuals and interests together around a shared vision and mission grounded in common values. This handbook is divided into five units. The first introduces the reader to the scholarly field of higher education and establishes the contextual framework for the rest of the book. The second investigates the multifaceted and often complex relationships that exist between institutions of higher learning and the external constituencies. The third focuses how college and university presidents and their board of trustees keep an institutional mission focused while adapting to changes in the environment, while the fourth analyzes how colleges and universities fulfill their core mission through shared democratic partnerships. The concluding unit concerns how effective academic leaders implement their institution’s academic mission. Both scholarly and accessible, this book is intended to be of interest to a broad audience, ranging from graduate students in higher education administration programs to members of institutional governing boards, and everyone in leadership positions in between. All of the authors have completed graduate work in a higher education administration program, and collectively have had experience with academic administration at every level through to the university presidency. Two of the authors are currently faculty in leading higher programs teaching classes in administration and organizational theory and have published widely in the scholarly field. One has been a member of a governing board. Study questions suitable for leadership training and graduate courses are provided online. See hot link at top right of this page.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 481 3 / $49.00
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 881 1 / $38.99
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Advancing Higher Education as a Field of Study
In Quest of Doctoral Degree Guidelines - Commemorating 120 Years of Excellence
Foreword by Lisa Wolf-Wendel
Winner of the 2015 Auburn Authors Awards Where is higher education as a field of study going in this century? How will higher education program leaders design and sustain their degree programs’ vitality in the face of perennial challenges from inside and outside the academy? While in 1979 the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) defined standards for student affairs master’s level preparation, and while 2010 saw the adoption of guidelines for higher education administration and leadership preparation programs at the master’s degree level, there still are, however, no guidelines that address higher education leadership doctoral programs, despite increasing demands for assessment and evaluation. This book suggests that higher education administration doctoral degree guidelines are a critical next step in advancing their program quality and continuity. It offers a review of the field’s history, the condition of its higher education programs, developments from the student affairs specialization and its guidelines, and a multi-chapter dialogue on the benefits or disadvantages of having guidelines. At a time of urgency to prepare the next generation of higher education faculty and leaders, this book sets out the parameters for the debate about what the guidelines should cover to ensure the appropriate and effective preparation of students. It also offers a useful framework for enriching the knowledge of deans, chairs, program coordinators and faculty who are engaged in program design, assessment, and revision. It will also be of interest to policymakers, the personnel of accrediting agencies, and not least graduate students within higher education preparation programs. All the contributors to this volume have the exemplary expertise, leadership experience, and a close association with higher education guidelines and standards, and have extensively contributed to the literature on higher education.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 111 5 / $49.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 113 9 / $39.99
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The Analytics Revolution in Higher Education
Big Data, Organizational Learning, and Student Success
Foreword by Randy L. Swing
Co-published with AIR. Co-published with ACE. In this era of “Big Data,” institutions of higher education are challenged to make the most of the information they have to improve student learning outcomes, close equity gaps, keep costs down, and address the economic needs of the communities they serve at the local, regional, and national levels. This book helps readers understand and respond to this “analytics revolution,” examining the evolving dynamics of the institutional research (IR) function, and the many audiences that institutional researchers need to serve. Internally, there is a growing need among senior leaders, administrators, faculty, advisors, and staff for decision analytics that help craft better resource strategies and bring greater efficiencies and return-on-investment for students and families. Externally, state legislators, the federal government, and philanthropies demand more forecasting and more evidence than ever before. These demands require new and creative responses, as they are added to previous demands, rather than replacing them, nor do they come with additional resources to produce the analysis to make data into actionable improvements. Thus the IR function must become that of teacher, ensuring that data and analyses are accurate, timely, accessible, and compelling, whether produced by an IR office or some other source. Despite formidable challenges, IR functions have begun to leverage big data and unlock the power of predictive tools and techniques, contributing to improved student outcomes.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 576 2 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 577 9 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 579 3 / $27.99
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Answering the Call
African American Women in Higher Education Leadership
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about women, particularly minority women, who fill this particular role. This book presents the stories, and the reflections on their paths to leadership in higher education, of seven African American women. Each has been the first woman, first African American, or first African American woman in one or more of the positions of authority that she has held. Each has overcome the double bind of sexism and racism that can inhibit the professional attainment of African American women. Although they followed different paths to leadership, similarities in their experiences, values, and beliefs emerge. They also express a need to give back to those communities that nourished their growth and leadership – of which this book is a manifestation. At a time when significant turnover in college leadership is about to occur – presenting increased opportunities for women and minorities – these leaders hope that the strategies they describe, the insights they impart, the experiences they recount, and, most of all, the passion they have sustained for the betterment of and greater inclusiveness in higher education, will inspire the next generation of women to answer the leadership call.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 253 6 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 254 3 / $26.95
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Building Teaching Capacities in Higher Education
A Comprehensive International Model
Foreword by James E. Groccia
This book is the culmination of three years’ work by teams from eight institutions in five different European and North American countries. The teams included faculty developers, professors, and graduate students interested in developing and disseminating a more profound understanding of university-level pedagogy. The purpose of the project was, first, to conceptualize what an internationally-appropriate, formal academic program for faculty development in higher education might look like, taking into account differing national contexts, from national standards for faculty development (U.K. and Scandinavia), almost universal institutional support (North America) to virtually no activities (France). The intention was to create and nurture a community of practice, enriched and informed by a range of expertise and different higher education traditions, cultures, and languages. To do so, the book begins with a section of five case studies that describe current practice in Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France and Switzerland. The second purpose was to define a common curriculum, or core course with common foundations, for faculty and graduate students, based on a distributed learning model. The final section of the book presents a concrete concept map used to define the curriculum, and to educational developers with useful tool for furthering their work, and explains the rationale for redefining faculty development as educational development. This book offers practitioners around the world a framework and model of educational development that can serve a number of purposes including professional development, monitoring and assessment of effectiveness, and research, as they seek to meet increasing demands for public accountability. For North American readers it offers insight into the vision and aims of the Bologna Process with which they may need to engage to maintain international competitiveness.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 410 3 / $47.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 500 1 / $37.99
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Building the Field of Higher Education Engagement
Foundational Ideas and Future Directions
Community engagement has evolved as a respected field and now occupies a seat at the academic table. In the past, this work had often been relegated to the institutional fringes of higher education, its practitioners marginalized, and the work often portrayed as service, not scholarly. Today, higher education community engagement is a dynamic and continually evolving field of scholarship and practice that carries ever-increasing academic respect. This book contributes to the ever-under-construction edifice by presenting a scaffolding of the scholarship that has been part of the building process, documenting and analyzing the past, speculating about the future, and framing a continuing conversation about and for the field. There are three parts to this book designed to promote a continuing field-building conversation: a look back at foundational documents of the field; a set of provocative questions interrogating those foundational works; and a look to the future by the next generation of leaders in the field. The central part is the special 20th anniversary issue of the Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, which brings together key documents of the scholarship of engagement with reflections on those documents by key scholars and/or the authors of the original works. In addition to highlighting the foundations and evolution of the field, this work also looks ahead to the next generation of voices and views as input to the conversation, with a closing chapter that includes invited essays by nine outstanding community-engaged thinkers and writers of the next 20 years who share their ideas about probable futures.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 854 1 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 855 8 / $37.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 857 2 / $29.99
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The Business of Innovating Online
Practical Tips and Advice from E-Learning Leaders
Foreword by Nina Huntemann
The Business of Innovating Online responds to a critical need for concrete narratives of innovation success that can serve as a foundation for administrators and leaders who are in need of practical guidance as they scale and grow their online learning organizations. Through specific examples and practical suggestions from experienced e-learning leaders, readers will be introduced to concrete strategies for how to create a climate of creativity and innovation that can lead to more successful and scalable online programs and initiatives. The Business of Innovating Online demystifies the relationship between business, creativity, and innovation by describing the logistics required to create an agile online education enterprise. Topics discussed will include: - Defining innovation and creativity for online education and e-learning - Knowing when and how to innovate - Creating a culture of innovation - Effectively leading innovation - Collaborative innovation - Making innovation stick and transitioning innovative strategies into day-to-day practice - Assuring quality in the midst of innovation - Staffing structures/administrative stability to support creativity and innovation The Business of Innovating Online provides both novice and experienced online education administrators with a comprehensive overview of a range of online innovations, how they came to be created, the components that led to their success, and concrete steps that they can take to create a more innovative culture for their own e-learning organization.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 842 8 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 843 5 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 845 9 / $27.99
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Cautionary Tales
Strategy Lessons From Struggling Colleges
Foreword by William G. Bowen
Scarcely a week goes by without a headline about the unsustainability of higher education as we know it, under threat from new models, for-profits, or online education. Most threatened are small liberal arts colleges – with commentators predicting the demise of colleges with fewer than 1,000, or even 1,500 students. Are these trends inevitable, or can they be overcome? Through a unique case study approach to examining and analyzing colleges that have struggled, Alice Brown reveals the steps that can lead to a sustainable operation and, when closure is inevitable, the steps to do so with orderliness and dignity. Rather than expounding on trends, or management theory and prescriptions, Brown focuses on narrative examples of survival and closure, recounted by real people in actual colleges, and reports the lessons they learned. Here are examples of strategies involving mergers, partnerships, or “going it alone”, and their outcomes, that illustrate principles that can serve as guides for fragile colleges struggling to address their social and economic challenges. Added to Brown’s six carefully researched and extended case studies, her own insights and analyses of decisions made and actions taken, this book offers guidance by seasoned scholars and administrators on issues as varied as leadership, the roles of the president, governing boards, faculty and staff, in articulating and implementing mission and strategies for survival, and on the changing landscape of higher education. The references to the literature on college survival strategies constitute an education in themselves. While this book is of immediate practical value for trustees and leaders of small colleges as they look toward and plan for the future and for anyone aspiring to an administrative positions in higher education, the examples constitute a microcosm of the interplay between the external constituencies, governance structures and internal forces that sustain or undermine institutional health, and which are hard to observe clearly in larger, more decentralized environments.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 779 1 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 780 7 / $38.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 782 1 / $30.99
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The Collaborative Department
How Five Campuses Are Inching Toward Cultures of Collective Responsibility
The first empirical examination and analysis of collective responsibility—that is, departments trying to act as "self-directed collectives working collaboratively toward goals derived from a well-articulated institutional mission". Based on five case studies of institutions involved in such initiatives and includes corresponding internal documents and an overview by the author. This is the companion volume to Departmental Assessment.

Paper: 978 1 56377 035 7 / $22.50
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College in the Crosshairs
An Administrative Perspective on Prevention of Gun Violence
Foreword by Kevin Kruger, Cindi Love
Gun violence – whether rampage shootings, homicides or suicides – is a potential reality all campuses have to face. This book provides leaders in higher education – and particularly those in student affairs – with data about past incidents, an analysis of trends, and background on the national debate about gun policies and how they impact colleges, state by state. It importantly raises issues about student psychological development, mental health, and the prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse on campus, to better inform discussion about allowing guns on campus and concealed carry. It concludes by sharing strategies for averting gun-related tragedies, and offering models for responding when they occur, based on lessons learned and best practices. The book addresses concealed carry legislation and its impact on campus policies by state, examining the concerns of administrators as they discharge their duty of care to students and comply with legal and regulatory frameworks. Asking “Are our students developmentally ready to make a morally sophisticated, life-changing decision to use firearms in response to a real or perceived threat?”, it offers important perspectives and scientific data, so far absent from the debate, to shape the ongoing conversation with lawmakers and the public about what it takes to keep college communities safe. In addressing risk and prevention, contributors cover the relationship between violence and mental health, and the need to establish comprehensive strategic plans and a preventative framework that promotes help-seeking for those in need before they reach the point of crisis, as well as a campus-wide risk assessment team, stressing the importance of cultivating a community-wide approach to campus safety by empowering members to report suspicious behavior. They also offer guidance on improving effective behavior intervention and case management processes. The book concludes by outlining best practices, and providing guidance on developing an emergency plan, practicing and testing systems, and creating a robust communications strategy. Individual chapters focus on how small colleges with limited resources can develop effective plans into by partnering with local agencies; as well as on the steps that community colleges – who generally lack resident advisors and residential staff, and whose students are far more dispersed – can take to diminish risk and respond promptly and professionally to a crisis. This is an essential guide for all higher education leaders concerned about preventing violence on our campuses, and a call to action.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 351 5 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 352 2 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 354 6 / $31.99
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Community College Leadership
A Multidimensional Model for Leading Change
Foreword by George R. Boggs
Two-year colleges are facing major change. The majority will undergo a turnover in college presidencies in the next ten years, at a time when they are being asked to be engines for economic growth, enable more students – and a greater diversity of students – to gain 21st century qualifications, and provide a pathway to higher degrees, all with reduced state and local funding. Recognizing that future community college leaders – at all levels– will manage increasingly complex organizations, and face very different challenges than their predecessors, this book provides a multidimensional model of leadership suited to these new demands and environments. The model addresses issues of leader cognition, race and gender, the importance of culture, and the need for more collaborative modes of communication and decision making to frame and implement change. It recognizes that there is no longer any one way to lead, and that the next generation of leaders will be more diverse, possess experience and qualifications from a wider variety of careers, and follow new pathways to their positions. Leaders in the future will possess a cultural competency that is fostered by being lifelong learners. Through over 75 individual interviews with leaders and campus members, Eddy is able to provide examples of the model’s components in practice and to illuminate which experiences proved the most relevant for these leaders on their route to upper administration. She shows how her model intersects with the leadership competencies defined by the American Association of Community Colleges, and proposes strategies for future leadership development. This book is intended for anyone considering a leadership position, at any level, in a community college; for college administrators and boards responsible for leadership development programs; and for individuals in corresponding organizations who conduct training programs for aspiring leaders. Likewise, those employed at four-year universities may find value in the model as a developmental tool.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 415 8 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 416 5 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 508 7 / $23.99
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Community Colleges as Incubators of Innovation
Unleashing Entrepreneurial Opportunities for Communities and Students
Foreword by Andy Stoll
Afterword by J. Noah Brown
While community colleges have traditionally focused on providing students with opportunities to gain credentials for employment, the increasingly important question is: Are they preparing students for the looming dynamic, disruptive, and entrepreneurial environments ahead? This book addresses the urgent need for community colleges to prioritize entrepreneurship education both to remain relevant in a changing economy and to graduate students with the flexible and interdisciplinary mindsets needed for the future of society. It argues that entrepreneurial education should be offered broadly to a wide range of students, and across all disciplines; defines the key constructs for achieving this objective; and describes how to create entrepreneurial learning environments. The expert contributors, with the support of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), start from the premise that community colleges are uniquely positioned to lead entrepreneurial initiatives through both internally-generated curriculum design and through collaboration with the local entrepreneurial community to build bridges between the classroom to the community which in turn can offer models of implementation and constitute a network or support system for students. Community colleges can become incubators of innovation, a magnet for talent, and provide the impetus for development strategies that their communities have not begun to realize. As the chapters make clear, developing an entrepreneurial program itself requires an entrepreneurial mindset that transcends any lack of resources, requiring a spirit of imagination and resourcefulness. This book takes the reader on a journey through the steps needed to build a meaningful, relevant, and sustainable entrepreneurship program, covering program development, curriculum design, appropriate pedagogical approaches, and community engagement.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 862 6 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 863 3 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 865 7 / $27.99
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The Community Engagement Professional's Guidebook
A Companion to The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education
Foreword by Andrew J. Seligsohn
This book is a companion guide to Campus Compact’s successful publication The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education. In the first text, Campus Compact Research Fellows - led by award-winning scholar-practitioner Lina D. Dostilio - identified a core of set of competencies needed by professionals charged with leading community engaged work on college campuses. In this companion guide, Dostilio teams up with Marshall Welch to build on the initial framework by offering guidance for how a community engagement professional (CEP) should conceptualize, understand, and develop their practice in each of the original competency areas. Over 10 chapters the authors address questions for those “brand new to the role” and interested in how to start a community engagement unit or center, or from people who are considering jobs doing the work on a campus, or from individuals “are trying to navigate the political environment on their campuses to expand and deepen their unit’s reach.” The Guidebook offers a rich and deep dive, breaking down the essential components of a professional’s work. From mentoring faculty research, leading campaigns to build civic engagement curriculum on campus, to managing the staff who support community engagement units, Dostilio and Welch tackle the breadth of the CEP’s work by drawing on key resources and their own decades of experience in the field. Throughout the book, readers will encounter “Compass Points” that call for personal reflection and engagement with the text. These interactive moments combine with end-of-chapter questions to prompt thinking about a CEP’s critical commitments, to create a powerful and engaging toolkit that will be essential for any person doing community and civic engagement work on campus.

Cloth: 978 1 945459 17 7 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 945459 18 4 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 945459 20 7 / $31.99
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The Complete Academic Search Manual
A Systematic Approach to Successful and Inclusive Hiring
* Covers searches for all faculty, staff, and administrative positions * Emphasizes aligning hires to departmental and institutional goals * Describes proven practices for successful outcomes Successful academic searches, where high caliber college faculty and administrators are recruited and retained, are critical to the vitality and sustainability of every institution. In higher education many faculty and administrators are thrust into the role of academic search with little preparation other than their own experience of being interviewed. Typically search committees also have to manage the process in the context of already heavy workloads. This manual provides faculty members, department heads, chairs, deans, and members of search committees with a straightforward ten-step process, using proven strategies and systematic planning, designed to facilitate group dynamics while members seek out and identify high caliber candidates and reach consensus on the best one for the institution. This book concisely lays out everything committee members need to know, replete with real life examples from diverse institutions, sample forms, timelines, and checklists. The process begins with the composition of the committee, understanding its charge, and the responsibilities of the chair and its members. It then leads the committee through the steps of drawing up the position description using input from all stakeholders, publicizing the position, evaluating resumes, planning and conducting interviews, narrowing the pool, to the final selection and negotiation processes. Throughout, the authors attend to issues of diversity and inclusion, aligning the hire with institutional goals, and avoiding legal pitfalls. Equally importantly, they set out a framework for welcoming, acclimating, and retaining new hires to ensure the return on the institution’s substantial investment of time and expense to recruit them.

Paper: 978 1 57922 139 3 / $26.00
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Connecting Non Full-time Faculty to Institutional Mission
A Guidebook for College/University Administrators and Faculty Developers
Foreword by Irene W.D. Hecht
Non full-time faculty—whether adjunct, part-time or contingent—has become the lifeline of a vast majority of colleges and universities. They teach many of the foundation and core courses taken by first- and second-year students, teach professional courses in which their own life experiences are invaluable, and step in at short notice to fill-in for regular faculty engaged in research or away on sabbaticals. A survey of over 4,000 institutions conducted by the US Department of Education reveals that such faculty are being hired at a much higher rate than their full-time counterparts--whether in response to increased enrollments, reduced budgets, or changing administrative strategies. The increasing presence of such faculty on campus can conflict with today’s demands for accountability and the pursuit of institutional mission. This book provides academic administrators and faculty developers with proactive, practical and results-producing approaches that can help transform fragmented faculties into integrated and cohesive teaching and scholarly communities. In an easy-to-follow format, this book constitutes a resource of thoughtful and pragmatic strategies to ensure quality and satisfaction both on the part of the institution and the adjuncts. Topics are presented in a thematic sequence that allows decision-makers to focus on their priority areas. The author offers guidance for systematic planning and implementation. The contents are focused on connecting non full-time faculty to core institutional functions and structures: Connection #1--to the institution; Connection #2--to the department; Connection #3--to teaching; Connection #4--to Students; and Connection #5--to scholarship. Originally announced as "Connecting Adjunct Faculty to the Academic Institution"

Paper: 978 1 57922 061 7 / $28.95
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Contingent Academic Labor
Evaluating Conditions to Improve Student Outcomes
Foreword by Adrianna Kezar
Contingent Academic Labor is a concise guide that offers higher education professionals a way to measure the degree of equality taking place in work environments for non-tenure track faculty across institutional settings. It frames the relevant issues and examines the nationwide situation facing contingent faculty across the professional landscape. The goal is to review contingent faculty treatment, and offer a standardized way to identify both equitable and unjust practices that impact adjunct faculty and their students by extension. The main feature of this guide is The Contingent Labor Conditions Score, a tool to help evaluate current labor practices that impact adjuncts in both positive and negative ways. The report card measures 3 areas of labor conditions: *Material Equity: Pay, job security and benefits *Professional Equity: Opportunities for advancement, professional development, academic freedom, sense of professional inclusion, and job satisfaction *Social Equity: Gender and race parity between contingent and non-contingent faculty in proportion to the population served This book will be useful for administrators and labor organizers alike in assessing the degree of exploitation, or empowerment, in their own institution. The Contingent Labor Conditions Score, as a standardized tool, will serve audiences on both sides of the discussion in creating positive steps forward, improving not only contingent faculty working conditions, but ultimately improving student outcomes.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 251 8 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 252 5 / $19.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 254 9 / $15.99
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Creating a Service Culture in Higher Education Administration
Service delivery is part and parcel of every higher education professional’s job, both to improve service to students and to each other as “internal customers”. Until now higher education professionals have had to rely, for their professional development, on books and training designed for the business sector. This book is the first to specifically address the needs of higher education professionals across a wide range of administrative functions within college and university environments. It is designed for administrative staff and management, ranging from professionals working in centralized functions such as student affairs and enrollment management to those working as advisors or in career centers, whether in community colleges, four-year institutions, or for-profit institutions. Each chapter applies customer service principles to scenarios that are relevant to higher education. The book begins by engaging the reader to define service and identify the external and internal customers who are recipients of that service. It then maps customer interactions into a series of steps and offers departments and individuals a tool to maximize the customer experience. Additional chapters address customer expectations, creating a service culture on your campus, and managerial influences on staff service delivery. Creating a Service Culture in Higher Education Administration is a complementary book to the online customer service and management training resources at softskillspros.com.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 004 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 005 7 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 007 1 / $19.99
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Creating Strategic Partnerships
A Guide for Educational Institutions and Their Partners
Foreword by Debra D. Bragg
What are the characteristics and conditions that lead to successful educational partnerships? What can we learn from partnerships that fail, cannot be sustained over time, or cease to benefit their partners? This book serves as a guide to the successful implementation of partnerships. It provides the context and tools for readers who are responding to the increasing demands of policy makers, funders and institutional leaders to use partnerships to address local, state and federal issues, achieve external mandates, meet public or internal agendas, or pursue international collaborations. This guide provides an evidence-based framework for institutional and organizational leaders to develop the vision, shared values and norms to achieve the “partnership capital” that will sustain an enduring relationship. It offers a three-phase model of the development process of collaboration, together with a tool box for those charged with partnering and leading organizational change, and includes a template for both creating new partnerships and sustaining existing ones. The authors start by differentiating between “traditional,” often ad-hoc, partnerships and “strategic partnerships” that align organizational strategy with partnership actions; and by identifying the importance of moving beyond incremental or surface “first order” change to develop deep “second order change” through which underlying structures and operations are questioned and new processes emerge due to the partnership. They offer analyses and understandings of seven key components for success: exploring motivations; developing partner relationships; communicating and framing purpose; creating collaborative structures and resources; leading various partnership stages; generating partnership capital; and implementing strategies for sustaining partnerships. Each chapter concludes with a case study to provide more understanding of the ideas presented, and for use in training or classes. This guide is addressed to policy makers and educational leaders, college administrators, and their non-profit and business partners, to enable them to lead and create strategic partnerships and facilitate organizational change.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 754 8 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 755 5 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 757 9 / $25.99
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Deadly Professors
A Faculty Development Mystery
Despite flecks of the victim’s blood and what looked like part of an eyebrow, one could make out the letters etched in an artistic, painstaking script that formed the killer’s message: Hippocrite “Great. A perp who can’t spell,” said Jarvis. “So you think it’s a student?” Professor Roland Norris has been murdered in the early morning hours on the grounds of Välkommen University, and the discovery of the crime sets the scene for Thomas Jones’ new campus mystery. As two more murders rattle the university, St. Paul detectives LeRon Jarvis and Robert Phan increasingly focus on the victims’ connections to Jack Ramble, professor of literature and chair of the department. Are the crimes motivated by academic rivalries or the university’s finances? A frantic golf cart chase down the 10th fairway of the East Oaks Country Club finally reveals all… As with Thomas Jones’ previous academic mystery, The Missing Professor, this book is a parody of the mystery genre and campus life, but with a serious purpose. In 26 entertaining and succinct chapters, the story line raises such issues as the nature of today’s college students, faculty roles and responsibilities, mid-career concerns, the purpose of liberal education, racial diversity, micro-aggression, inclusive teaching, technology and learning, politics and the classroom, active learning, the role of sports in higher education, and academic freedom, to name but a few. This book will enliven, and ensure spirited discussion at any orientation, workshop, or faculty development activity.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 449 3 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 450 9 / $23.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 514 8 / $18.99
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Degrees That Matter
Moving Higher Education to a Learning Systems Paradigm
Sponsored by NILOA. Concerned by ongoing debates about higher education that talk past one another, the authors of this book show how to move beyond these and other obstacles to improve the student learning experience and further successful college outcomes. Offering an alternative to the culture of compliance in assessment and accreditation, they propose a different approach which they call the Learning System Paradigm. Building on the shift in focus from teaching to learning, the new paradigm encourages faculty and staff to systematically seek out information on how well students are learning and how well various areas of the institution are supporting the student experience and to use that information to create more coherent and explicit learning experiences for students. The authors begin by surveying the crowded terrain of reform in higher education and proceed from there to explore the emergence of this alternative paradigm that brings all these efforts together in a coherent way. The Learning System Paradigm presented in chapter two includes four key elements—consensus, alignment, student-centeredness, and communication. Chapter three focuses upon developing an encompassing notion of alignment that enables faculty, staff, and administrators to reshape institutional practice in ways that promote synergistic, integrative learning. Chapters four and five turn to practice, exploring the application of the paradigm to the work of curriculum mapping and assignment design. Chapter six focuses upon barriers to the work and presents ways to start and options for moving around barriers, and the final chapter explores ongoing implications of the new paradigm, offering strategies for communicating the impact of alignment on student learning. The book draws upon two recent initiatives in the United States: the Tuning process, adapted from a European approach to breaking down siloes in the European Union educational space; and the Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP), a document that identifies and describes core areas of learning that are common to institutions in the US. Many of the examples are drawn from site visit reports, self-reported activities, workshops, and project experience collected by the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA) between 2010 and 2016. In that six-year window, NILOA witnessed the use of Tuning and/or the DQP in hundreds of institutions across the nation.

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The Department Chair as Transformative Diversity Leader
Building Inclusive Learning Environments in Higher Education
Foreword by Walter H. Gmelch
With the imminent demographic shifts in our society and the need to prepare students for citizenship in a global, knowledge-based society, the role of the academic department chair in creating diverse and inclusive learning environments is arguably the most pivotal position in higher education today. In the United States, increasing minority student enrollment coupled with the emergence of a minority majority American nation by 2042 demands that academic institutions be responsive to these changing demographics. The isolation of the ivory tower is no longer an option. This is the first book to address the role of the department chair in diversity and addresses an unmet need by providing a research-based, systematic approach to diversity leadership in the academic department based upon survey findings and in-person interviews. The department chair represents the nexus between the faculty and the administration and is positioned uniquely to impact diversity progress. Research indicates that more than 80 percent of academic decisions regarding appointment, curriculum, tenure and promotion, classroom pedagogy, and student outcomes are made by the department chair in consultation with the faculty. This book examines the multidimensional contributions that chairs make in advancing diversity within their departments and institutions in the representation of diverse faculty and staff; in tenure and promotion; curricular change; student learning outcomes; and departmental climate. The scope and content of the book is not limited to institutions in the United States but is applicable to academic institutions globally in their efforts to address the access and success of increasingly diverse student populations. It addresses institutional power structures and the role of the dean in relation to the appointment of chairs and their impact on the success of chairs from non-dominant groups, including female, minority, and lesbian/gay/transgendered individuals who serve in predominantly white male departments. Using qualitative and quantitative research methods, the book analyzes predominant structural and behavioral barriers that can impede diversity progress within the academic department. It then focuses upon the opportunities and challenges chairs face in their collaborative journey with faculty and administration toward inclusive departmental and institutional practices. Each chapter provides concrete strategies that chairs can use to strengthen diversity in the academic department. Addressed to department chairs, deans, faculty, and administrative leaders in higher education in all Western societies facing demographic change and global challenges, this book offers a critical road map to creating the successful academic institutions that will meet the needs of our changing populations.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 237 2 / $125.00
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Departmental Assessment
How Some Campuses Are Effectively Evaluating the Collective Work of Faculty
Reports the results of a survey to locate campus evaluation policies and practices that encourage constructive change in departments and a stronger culture of collective responsibility for the unit's success. Specific recommendations are offered–ideas that could aid in creating a more "self-regarding" institution, stronger and more widely accepted methods for evaluating departments and collectives, and eventually greater flexibility for departmental faculty. The authors review materials from 130 institutions, following visits to eight campuses, and identify the key components: (1) the degree to which the organizational and cultural setting promotes a conducive atmosphere for evaluation; (2) the credibility and fairness of evaluation policies and practices; and (3) the validity and reliability of evaluation standards, criteria, and measures. Supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Paper: 978 1 56377 049 4 / $19.95
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The Disciplines Speak I
Rewarding the Scholarly, Professional, and Creative Work of Faculty
This set of two volumes offers statements from disciplinary/professional societies on what faculty work deserves recognition and reward in their unique culture/community. Volume I covers religion, history, geography, math, chemistry, the arts, business, journalism, and family/consumer science, plus the National Education Association.

Paper: 978 1 56377 034 0 / $29.95
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The Disciplines Speak II
More Statements on Rewarding the Scholarly, Professional, and Creative Work of Faculty
This set of two volumes offers statements from disciplinary/professional societies on what faculty work deserves recognition and reward in their unique culture/community. Volume II covers teacher education, nursing physics, psychology, civil engineering, medical education, library science, social work, English, black studies, women's studies, and college science teaching.

Paper: 978 1 56377 047 0 / $29.95
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Doing the Public Good
Latina/o Scholars Engage Civic Participation
How can scholars reconnect themselves—and their students—to higher education’s historic but much diluted mission to work for the public good? Through the lenses of personal reflection and auto-ethnography—and drawing on such rich philosophical foundations as the Spanish tradition of higher learning, the holistic Aztec concept of education, the Hispanic notion of bien educado, and the activist principles of the Chicano movement–these writers explore the intersections of private and public good, and how the tension between them has played out in their own lives and the commitments they have made to their intellectual community, and to their cultural and family communities. Through often lyrical memoirs, reflections, and poetry, these authors recount their personal journeys and struggles—often informed by a spiritual connectedness and always driven by a concern for social justice—and show how they have found individual paths to promoting the public good in their classrooms, and in the world beyond. Contributors include: Jennifer Ayala; Dolores Delgado Bernal; Flora V Rodriguez-Brown; Kenneth P. Gonzales; Miguel Guajardo; Francisco Guajardo; Aida Hurtado; Maria A. Hurtado; Arcelia L. Hurtado, Raymond V. Padilla; Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner; and Luis Urrieta Jr.

Paper: 978 1 57922 263 5 / $29.95
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Driving Change Through Diversity and Globalization
Transformative Leadership in the Academy
Foreword by Ronald A. Crutcher
This book significantly advances discussion of the mission of higher education in today’s multicultural environment and global economy. It sets out the challenges and considerations that must be addressed by administrative leaders, by trustees, and others who shape the vision and direction of the institution – but most particularly by academic deans and faculty. The author makes the case that the inclusion of a diversity and globalization in disciplinary work contributes to the research agendas of individual faculty and their departments, aligns with scholarly values, and promotes such student learning goals as tolerance of ambiguity and paradox, critical thinking and creativity. He offers a strategic vision of success, backed by theory and examples of effective application, for creating transformative change; and provides a roadmap to implementing inclusive pedagogical practices and curricula. With implementation dependent on leadership and participation at every level of an institution, everyone with a stake in its future should read this book.

Paper: 978 1 57922 099 0 / $29.95
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Ebony Towers in Higher Education
The Evolution, Mission, and Presidency of Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Foreword by Lenoar Foster
What is the purpose of black colleges? Why do black colleges continue to exist? Are black colleges necessary? Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are at the same time the least studied and the least understood institutions of higher education and the most maligned and the most endangered. This unique study examines the mission of four-year HBCUs from the perspective of the campus president, as a foundation for understanding the relevance and role of these institutions. This is the first research to focus on the role of presidents of black colleges; is based on extensive interviews with fifteen presidents; and takes into particular account the type of campus environments in which they operate. Unlike community colleges, women’s colleges, men’s colleges, and Hispanic-serving colleges, Black colleges are racially identifiable institutions. They also vary significantly in, among other characteristics: size, control (public or private), religious affiliation, gender composition, and available resources. Although united in the historic mission of educating African Americans, each black college or university has its own identity and set of educational objectives. The book examines how presidents define and implement mission in the context of their campuses, view the challenges they face, and confront the factors that promote or hinder implementation of their missions.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 273 4 / $125.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Leading Change through Assessment
Executive Summary With increasing public demands for accountability, there is a need to collect and present evidence of the effectiveness of practices and outcomes in higher education. Transformational leadership can facilitate the use of such evidence to improve programs and services that positively influence student learning. This form of leadership can be initiated top-down by presidents, chief academic officers, deans, and department chairs and/or bottom-up by students, faculty, staff, and other stakeholders. This briefing explores the leadership styles and insights about assessment of top administrators from eleven colleges and universities nationwide that have established reputations for good practice in outcomes assessment. In interviews with these leaders, we examine their perspectives on the following aspects of assessment: the vision, barriers, risks, methods of stakeholder engagement and support, collection and application of data, and sustainability of the process. Emergent themes in leading institutional change through assessment include the need for collaboration among administrators, faculty, and student affairs professionals; adequate training, recognition, and rewards for faculty and staff; and incorporation of assessment data into strategic plans, annual reports, budget hearings, and program reviews.

Journal: 978 1 57922 153 9 / $20.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Faculty Performance Reviews
Executive Summary This briefing is intended primarily for department chairs and other unit administrators responsible for regular faculty performance reviews. It offers an overview of faculty performance reviews in the broader context of faculty development at the unit level and provides guidance for academic administrators on conducting reviews and writing appraisals. The role of the faculty performance review has been elevated in recent years for a number of reasons. Increasingly, colleges and universities award salary increases on the basis of merit or performance, which requires an accurate assessment of performance relative to some standard. In a resource-challenged environment, aligning the efforts of faculty with unit and institutional goals becomes more critical; performing well in important areas becomes more important. Standards for earning tenure and promotion seem to rise constantly. A record of excellent performance is usually necessary for a favorable tenure and/or promotion decision. In the face of public criticism and/or institutional self-examination, many institutions have initiated post-tenure review to ensure that tenured faculty are performing at acceptable levels. The annual faculty performance review, especially when it has a developmental component, helps to ensure that faculty perform at high levels year in and year out.

Journal: 978 1 57922 151 5 / $20.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Becoming a Department Chair: To Be or Not To Be
Executive Summary This briefing is an exploration of the path an individual might take in deciding to become a department chair. It gives advice concerning the challenges, rewards, and strategies for success and survival to prospective chairs (and their deans). It discusses some basics about the job, and the motivation expressed by chairs as they undertake this responsibility. It asks: “Do you really want this job?” and explores that issue through a series of questions. It also looks at steps to take once you have said, “yes.”

Journal: 978 1 57922 152 2 / $20.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Fostering Scholarly Research in Departments and Colleges
Executive Summary This briefing is designed primarily for department chairs, but it will also be useful to all academic administrators. It offers suggestions by which chairs can build the research profiles of their departments. This briefing is developed around a series of concepts reported from a study of researchactive departments (Bland, Weber-Main, Lund, & Finstad, 2005), which include developing clear goals, encouraging participative research leadership, recruiting/selecting research-driven faculty, developing a positive group climate/culture, and providing mentoring. Chairs must develop clear goals for areas of research focus within the department. As these areas are established, faculty must develop specific goals for their research groups including overarching questions that will drive the groups’ research agenda. However, these research groups and faculty plans must be developed in a participatory style that involves everyone in the process and in the decisions that are made. Departments must hire, support, and mentor research-active faculty. That involves faculty working together to support each other and the chair providing consistent support and encouragement for the faculty and research groups. Good research leadership helps to identify and provides sources for research, promotes interdisciplinary research agendas, and encourages a positive research climate in the department. In addition to recruiting, hiring, and supporting research-active faculty, the chair and department must continue to support more senior faculty. Sometimes this involves helping them to develop new research models and technical skills to find the keys to success with grant activities. Support may also involve faculty developmental leaves to enhance research knowledge and skills. Finally, the chair must develop new skills to provide effective research leadership. To some extent, the new chair, who wishes to build a research-productive department, must move from research specialist to research generalist. The chair must gain through practice the knowledge and skills to articulate the department’s (and its faculty’s) research agenda to the broader academic, professional, and general community.

Journal: 978 1 57922 154 6 / $20.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Faculty Development Programs
Executive Summary Few things are more essential to the success of an academic institution than vital faculty members. Vital faculty members are passionately involved in and committed to their work; committed to the goals of their institutions; continually developing their teaching and research abilities; and consistently growing in and contributing to their disciplines. These desired faculty characteristics must be nurtured over the career continuum, a responsibility that often falls on the shoulders of busy department chairs and deans. The goal of this briefing is to assist academic leaders with the critical task of maintaining their faculty’s vitality—a task otherwise known as faculty development. We begin this briefing by describing the changed societal conditions that make continuous faculty vitality essential not only to institutional success, but also to national welfare. Next, we describe how faculty development initiatives have changed in focus and form over time, as well as what themes and methods have persisted. Then we outline the key steps undergirding any successful faculty development program, offering more detailed guidance on two steps in particular: (1) assessing faculty and institutional vitality needs, using either a broad or targeted assessment approach; and (2) tailoring faculty development strategies to best meet the specialized needs of specific faculty groups, using case examples of new, midcareer, and senior faculty. We conclude with guidelines for designing and maintaining an institutional office for faculty development that can support and coordinate department-level initiatives.

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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Change Management
Executive Summary Departmental chairs and their departments face a range of external and internal forces that challenge academic traditions and expectations. Critics suggest that departments are either unwilling or unable to respond. Chairs play a significant leadership role in initiating and facilitating change processes to make necessary changes. External and internal forces for change in departments are described. Three types of changes are identified: (1) adaptations in which people make adjustments only to changes that are in place, (2) innovations or major changes in which new ideas and procedures are implemented, and (3) change creation in which organizations make priority changes to be on the cutting edge. The changes occur at the individual, group, and departmental level. Change can be managed in a number of ways and is usually driven by an implicit or explicit model. This briefing suggests that an eight-stage model is a useful guide. The eight stages are (1) establishing a sense of urgency, (2) creating a guiding coalition, (3) developing a vision and strategy, (4) communicating the change vision, (5) empowering broad-based action, (6) generating short-term wins, (7) consolidating gains and producing more change, and (8) anchoring new approaches in the culture. No matter what model is adopted, chairs are both managers and leaders of change. It is suggested that leadership is particularly crucial to the change process, because it is driven by vision, motivation, and meaning-making. Chairs should also play the roles of gadfly and facilitator. Resistance to change is part of the change process. Concerns should be surfaced and addressed so that people can move through the change process. Kinds of resistance identified are tradition, self-interest, lack of skills or competencies, change mandated from the top, flavor of the month, not invented here, complacency, and faculty nearing retirement. A number of strategies to address resistance are suggested. They include demonstrating empathy and understanding for those in the change process; tying initiatives to the vision, mission, and values of the department; showing that the proposed change is consistent with the academic traditions and expectations; building on previous successes; and communicating often and in a variety of ways. In this briefing I describe eleven effective practice principles to guide chairs in their change efforts: (1) respect the people and traditions, (2) make decisions and processes transparent, (3) keep one eye on the present and one on the horizon, (4) value involvement in the life of the department, (5) involve faculty and staff in the what and how of decisions, (6) recognize that change management has a human side to it, (7) understand the difference between management and leadership, (8) have a short list of what is really important, (9) invest in having everyone be successful in the change process, (10) be sincere and authentic in whatever you do, and (11) make change management a priority. Change management is critical to departmental success today and will be even more so in the future. Department chairs need to take the lead in this process.

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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Planning for Improvement in the Academic Department
Executive Summary In this briefing I describe trends in higher education that impact the hiring and success of tenure-track faculty: increasing competition for the “best and the brightest,” the “generational change” expected as a cohort of retiring senior faculty is replaced by a new generation, and expanding roles for faculty as external influences widen expectations for higher education. I review some of the research on expectations and concerns of early-career faculty, highlighting particularly the difficulties young faculty members have identified in (1) understanding and achieving expectations for tenure and promotion, (2) becoming socialized in their institutions and departments and finding colleagues with whom to collaborate, and (3) balancing the multiple demands of jobs and personal and family responsibilities. In addition, I explore the multiple forms of scholarship in which new faculty members are often expected to become engaged, along with the risks associated with expanded expectations and the resulting “overloaded plate.” By reviewing the results from job-satisfaction surveys of tenure-track faculty, with attention to the expectations of women and minority faculty and faculty at different types of institutions, I have identified what administrators can learn about creating competitive academic workplaces. Among the factors affecting workplace satisfaction for early-career faculty is work-life balance. I include a review of recent efforts to implement policies and practices to assist faculty, particularly early-career faculty, in balancing work and family responsibilities. Finally, I provide a list of questions that chairs and their departments can ask themselves about the support that they provide early-career faculty, and I present professional development resources. The briefing identifies the important role of the department chair in providing new faculty members—indeed, all faculty members—a supportive environment that offers clearly defined expectations and appropriate rewards, a balanced work life, and opportunities for collegiality and community.

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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Developing Faculty for New Roles and Changing Expectations
Executive Summary This briefing is designed primarily for department chairs, but it will also be useful to other academic administrators responsible for faculty development. It is based on a series of findings reported from our major study of the field of faculty development in higher education (Sorcinelli, Austin, Eddy, & Beach, 2006). It asks two important questions: What are the key challenges facing faculty members and their institutions? and What are the issues around which faculty members are likely to need support over the next few years? It is important to note that while the term faculty development broadly refers to assisting faculty to become more effective in performing all roles related to academic life, a large number of our findings focus on roles and responsibilities related to teaching and student learning. We begin this briefing by identifying the key challenges and pressures facing faculty members and their institutions in this changing world of higher education. These are the changing nature of the professoriate; the changing nature of the student body; and the changing nature of teaching, learning, and scholarship. Next, we offer an overview of each of these challenges and discuss how department chairs can initiate activities that respond to them in ways that support the professional development of their faculty. We conclude by offering five specific action steps that chairs can take as they guide and support their departments in an era of dramatic change, not only in the expectations for our faculty and the profile of our students, but also in our paradigms for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Departmental Effectiveness
Executive Summary This briefing explores one of the most common leadership roles in academe— that of a department chair. It draws distinctions between the skills and knowledge necessary for successful management of an individual career and those required for farsighted departmental leadership, which calls for a holistic, organizational-level view of a program or a department as part of the larger institution. The briefing describes an in-depth approach to planning, assessment, and improvement in academic departments, using as a model the Malcolm Baldrige Program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This model was adapted to the needs of higher-education institutions, with their particular emphases on scholarship, research, service, outreach, and teaching and instruction. The resulting Excellence in Higher Education (EHE) model, first developed at Rutgers University in 1994 and now in its seventh version (Ruben, 2007a), provides an integrated approach to assessment, planning, and improvement, drawing on the Baldrige model, as well as on standards and language of the institutional accrediting associations. The following seven categories of the EHE are seen as interrelated parts of a unified system: (1) leadership, (2) strategic planning, (3) beneficiaries and constituencies, (4) programs and services, (5) faculty/staff and workplace, (6) assessment and information use, and (7) outcomes and achievements. The briefing elaborates on the application of the EHE framework by focusing on its categories as well as the EHE process and several ways that it can be used. The impact of the model is shown through results of two studies conducted to assess the practical value of EHE to participants. The briefing then discusses the framework outcomes in terms of specific improvement initiatives adopted by departments that have used EHE as well as lessons learned from more than 50 EHE assessments nationwide. Finally, the briefing highlights the contributions of EHE to fostering successful leadership practices and ultimately advancing the mission of a department, a program, and the larger institution.

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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Creating and Supporting a Flexible Work-Life Environment for Faculty and Staff
Executive Summary The face of academe, and the roles played by faculty and staff, have changed dramatically over the past 30 years. Women are now a significant part of the workforce, and men are taking increasing responsibility for the care of their children. These changes require that university leaders, particularly department chairs, take an active role in supporting the “work-life balance” of their employees. Before they can begin to do so, administrators need to understand the concept of “work-life integration,” sometimes referred to as “work-family flexibility,” or “flexible work arrangements.” These terms refer to an individual’s ability to meet his or her responsibilities at work, at home, and in the community with a sense of competence and a manageable level of stress. Our goals for this briefing are threefold: First, we describe some of the most common policies and practices related to a flexible work-life environment. A wide variety of work-life policies and programs may be offered by a university to assist faculty and staff in integrating and successfully managing their roles and responsibilities. Often this increased flexibility can be implemented at no additional cost to the university. Second, we discuss the many ways in which a flexible work-life environment is beneficial to faculty, staff, and their institutions. Flexible work options are a key factor in improving an institution’s success in hiring, job satisfaction, and retention. A flexible work-life environment decreases employee stress and improves a unit’s ability to achieve diversity and equity. It also increases the productivity of faculty and staff, a primary goal of any academic leader. Third, we describe several things that department chairs can do to create and support work-life flexibility in their departments. Based on faculty work-life policy research, we offer advice on the factors to consider in creating policies and in shaping a climate in which faculty and staff feel safe using them. We present best practice ideas, as well as stories from faculty interviews. These enable academic administrators to develop a rich understanding of the value of a flexible work-life environment for their faculty, staff, and institutions.

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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Strategic Planning for Diversity and Organizational Change
Executive Summary This briefing is designed for senior academic leaders and others engaged in the work of campus diversity and organizational change, whether at the president, provost, dean, or department head level, or participating in campuswide diversity planning committees and commissions as students, faculty, and staff. Although the briefing focuses on the key role of academic leadership, we developed it so that it would be helpful for the full spectrum of individuals often charged with intersecting with the diversity planning and leadership process. It is based on several concepts that emerged as part of a project by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) on the future of diversity work in higher education, Inclusive Excellence (Williams, Berger, & McClenden, 2005); a project examining dedicated executive-level diversity leadership, The Chief Diversity Officer Project (Williams & Wade-Golden, 2006; in press); the scholarly literature on diversity and organizational change; and our individual experiences building sustainable capacity to support and nurture diversity as administrators, researchers, consultants, and thought leaders nationally and at our respective institutions. We describe the context for understanding the environmental dynamics of diversity in the 21st century and the challenge of the diversity planning process. Next, we identify three key existing diversity models and a new multidimensional model that offers promise for enhancing diversity efforts on college and university campuses. We conclude with multiple principles— which we call change levers—important for academic leaders interested in applying this model to leading and managing diversity in a way that is systematic, focused on diversity’s implications for all students, driven by accountability techniques, and intended to create real and meaningful change at all levels of institutional culture: the Inclusive Excellence Model of organizational change and diversity (Williams et al., 2005).

Journal: 978 1 57922 165 2 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 393 9 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Promoting a Climate for Teaching and Learning
Executive Summary Although this briefing is written primarily for department chairs, its topic, creating a climate for teaching and learning, is an institutional affair and cannot be fully realized without broader support from academic leaders. I take as a conceptual starting point Boyer’s (1990b) influential text Scholarship Reconsidered and thus begin with the premise that improving teaching and learning requires that we think about teaching as an activity not wholly segregated from other scholarly activity—thereby requiring entirely different kinds of support—but as an activity that can benefit from the same kinds of encouragement and support that foster research and scholarship. There are, in fact, many parallels between the suggestions and practical advice that support good teaching and those that support research and scholarship. I have drawn the suggestions in this briefing from a variety of sources, including personal experience. To help department chairs make wise choices in implementing these ideas, I have organized the practical suggestions within a framework for transformative change. The assumption in doing so is that department chairs want to make lasting changes and that seeing each suggestion as part of a larger process will make it easier for them to do so. Finally, because one of the most significant and important steps that departments need to take to instill a climate for teaching and learning is to create contexts for conversations, I have provided in the annotated bibliography articles and books that could be used to encourage departmental discussion and dialogue.

Journal: 978 1 57922 166 9 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 394 6 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Budgeting for Department Chairs
Executive Summary This briefing is intended primarily for academic department chairs but may also be useful to other academic unit administrators with budget responsibility. It offers an overview of department budgeting in the context of the institution’s budget and provides guidance on how to build, negotiate, and manage the budget for an academic department. The briefing begins with a discussion of how mastery of the fundamentals of budgeting enables the academic department chair to exercise responsible fiduciary leadership. The discussion of fundamentals includes a review of the roles that a budget plays, and presents the pros and cons of different institution-wide budget models, such as incremental budgeting and responsibility center budgeting, as well as the impact of the international, national, state, local, and campus context on the department budget. The discussion of the fundamentals of budgeting also describes the various types of institutional budgets, such as operating, capital, and auxiliary, as well as budget components, such as revenue sources and uses of funds. The chair should actively engage the faculty in the actual process of budget planning and development. The process should begin with an analysis of the department’s past performance and productivity and include the development of a strategic action plan. This briefing includes a series of questions that the chair should ask when reviewing the department’s past and/or current budgets in order to understand the starting point for department budgeting. With a plan in place and an understanding of the past, the chair needs to shift the focus to the future and translate the strategic plan into the resources needed. This briefing provides financial, personnel, and programmatic strategies that can be used to increase operating flexibility. There are many competing demands for new resources; the chair must be knowledgeable about how to negotiate for these resources to meet the department’s needs. The briefing includes guidance on effective negotiation, including knowing your audience, making the case, and knowing the components of a powerful budget request. The paper concludes by identifying and discussing the tools and knowledge that the chair needs to manage the budget effectively throughout the year.

Journal: 978 1 57922 168 3 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 396 0 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Enriching Student Learning
Executive Summary This briefing identifies strategies for enriching the learning experiences of undergraduate students. It is based on the findings of Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Education Experiences), a study of 20 institutions that had higher than predicted six-year cohort graduation rates and scores on the National Survey of Student Engagement. It describes a number of learning experiences and provides suggestions related to the implementation of programs and services to enrich the student learning experience.

Journal: 978 1 57922 169 0 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 397 7 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Managing the Transition Between Chairs
Executive Summary This briefing lays out a process for preparing a new chair to assume the leadership of an academic department. I review processes and considerations for the transition between department chairs, including using the transition period for acculturating new chairs to the job, providing them with useful documentation and information, giving them access to department rules and processes, having them shadow the incumbent chair, and introducing them to key personnel. I then address how preparation of the new chair, psychologically and otherwise, may be conducted during the transition period. The briefing then examines how the new chair may be alerted to and prepared for the different communication skills needed in transitioning from faculty member to department chair, including those involved in persuasion, negotiation, and running meetings. I also describe the documentation of the department’s activities that incumbent chairs should prepare for their successors. A table giving a sample chronology of tasks throughout the academic year with links to supporting documents is included. Finally, I consider the sensitivities associated with having the previous chair “return to the ranks.”

Journal: 978 1 57922 170 6 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 398 4 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Conflict Management
Executive Summary A successful academic leader such as a department chair or dean must be able to discern and manage conflicts effectively. Conflict is a natural state of existence in our everyday lives, and the academic setting is no exception. In an era of greater accountability, pressures to increase student enrollment, declining resources, and the expectation to recruit and retain a more diverse faculty and student body, the probability of an academic leader engaging in or having to resolve conflict is on the rise. The nature or types of conflicts in an academic setting vary, from the individuals involved to the issues that lead to them. Conflict can arise over issues related to faculty hires, the allocation of department and college resources, performance evaluations, achieving and working with diversity, and relationships among departmental personnel. We cannot avoid conflict in an academic setting any more than we can elsewhere in our daily experiences, but the consequences of engaging in it are not always negative. In fact, conflict, if managed well, can lead to growth and development. However, many of us are not equipped with the skills to manage conflict, and we do not know whom to refer to when conflicts arise on a college or university campus. We assume that academic leaders know how to manage conflict well, but conflict management is an overlooked area of faculty and administrator development. This briefing conveys an overview of conflict management, some common causes of conflict, how people respond to conflict, how social justice influences conflict, the modes people use to address conflict, how to identify our conflict management style, conflicts involving bullying and bias, and how administrators can enhance their skills in conflict management.

Journal: 978 1 57922 171 3 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 399 1 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Leading Through Teams
Executive Summary This briefing explores the demand for, and development of, academic departments as teams. With nearly 80 percent of all administrative decisions in universities taking place at the department level, there is a growing realization that team leadership at the department level may be more critical now than ever before. The academic leader’s challenge is to create a dynamic collective culture. This briefing begins with a definition of academic teams and analyzes the team’s dimensions, such as size, skills, diversity, common purposes, and accountability. Next, the briefing guides the reader through the four stages of team development: forming, storming, norming, and performing. However, because barriers to teamwork are embedded in the structural, cultural, and political fabrics of universities, the next section helps academic leaders to assess the readiness of their departments for teamwork. The final sections discuss the faculty-based model for building effective teams through leadership, goal alignment, decision-making, conflict management, and faculty excellence.

Journal: 978 1 57922 172 0 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 400 4 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Outreach: New Opportunities for Academic Departments
Executive Summary A generation into the information revolution, many academic departments find themselves at a crossroads. Many of the old assumptions on which the academic enterprise is based have been eroded as society’s needs have changed. Departments find themselves struggling to find their place within an increasingly global academic community and to maintain relationships with external constituencies in an increasingly competitive environment. As departments seek to redefine their relevance in this rapidly shifting environment, outreach—once something done in a faculty member’s spare time—is becoming strategically important to both academic departments and individual faculty members. In this briefing, I describe some of the external factors that are driving outreach activities into the mainstream of strategic academic planning and define several major types of outreach practice, giving examples of effective practices along the way. I also outline a process for planning outreach programs and for creating a strategic plan for outreach within an academic department. In addition, I examine some key issues surrounding how to sustain outreach, especially the important issue of recognizing and rewarding faculty participation in this increasingly vital part of life in an academic community.

Journal: 978 1 57922 173 7 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 401 1 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Department Chairs and Servant Leadership
Executive Summary This briefing is intended to increase the knowledge and understanding of department chairs and their supervisors of a current leadership philosophy and practice known as servant leadership. It examines servant leadership in the context of the department and the chair’s functions. In 1970, Robert Greenleaf first described servant leadership. He viewed servant leadership as a deep desire to serve—a prerequisite to leadership— and identified 10 characteristics of servant leaders. Barbuto and Wheeler (2006) added an additional one: calling. Subsequently, in a new model, Barbuto and Wheeler reduced these 11 characteristics to 5 and redefined them as the following factors: altruistic calling, emotional healing, persuasive mapping, wisdom, and organizational stewardship. They also developed an empirical survey instrument for measuring these factors, the Servant Leadership Questionnaire (SLQ). In this briefing, I suggest that servant leadership is an appropriate practice for chairs because many of its outcomes (e.g., positive work environment, empowerment, and service) are those that chairs desire. Research thus far suggests that servant leadership also results in greater commitment, satisfaction, effort, and trust. I provide numerous examples of these outcomes in this briefing. This briefing also addresses a number of broad questions and issues about servant leadership: Is servant leadership too idealistic and “soft” to be effective? Are decisions determined by the leader’s ego needs? Can servant leadership be used to address all leadership and management functions? Can one be a servant leader in a nonservant organization? How does a servant leader deal with the paradoxes of chairing a department? Can the chair meet followers’ highest-priority needs? Can’t individual needs conflict with organizational needs? Are the means as important as the ends? Why should chairs take the Servant Leadership Questionnaire (SLQ) as a development experience?

Journal: 978 1 57922 174 4 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 402 8 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Intercultural Competency—Preparing Students to Be Global Citizens THE BALDWIN-WALLACE EXPERIENCE
Executive Summary This briefing argues that it is time to look at internationalization and multicultural education with an integrated approach that incorporates them more directly into the student learning experience. Drawing on recent proposals from national educational associations like the American Council on Education (ACE) and the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), it contends that it is time to mainstream common elements of both internationalization and multicultural education, not as add-ons but as integral components that enhance liberal education as it is currently being offered both within and outside the classroom. Like most changes in higher education, how relevant these suggestions are will be determined by administrators, faculty, and staff in the context of their own institutions. The issues discussed here are illustrated by looking more closely at a case study of Baldwin-Wallace College (B-W), a medium-size comprehensive college with a liberal arts focus located in Berea, Ohio. It describes the effective practices taken by this institution as it wrestles with these issues as part of a larger discussion surrounding the adoption of a new mission statement and revised core curriculum. It follows the process of curricular revision and related changes in institutional structure at B-W since the development of a new mission in 2000 and shows (a) how multicultural and international education developed separately at first as part of the larger process of institutional change and (b) how their common elements were then reconceptualized by faculty to help students understand how they relate to others domestically and globally. The briefing highlights the College’s ongoing efforts to infuse intercultural competence campuswide.

Journal: 978 1 57922 206 2 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 403 5 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Legal Issues for Academic Leaders
Executive Summary Colleges and universities are subject to increasing litigation, legislation, and regulation on a myriad of issues. The law affects virtually every aspect of academic life. Thus, academic leaders must possess an adequate familiarity with the law to know when and where to go when legal issues or complaints arise. They must also understand the different sources of law to which they are subject (e.g., federal, state, local). For example, public and private institutions have many similarities and are treated the same under many statutes but are not always subject to the same legal parameters. Furthermore, academic leaders must be conscious of the ways in which an institution’s own promises, policies, and procedures can create expectations that may be legally binding and enforceable. This briefing provides an overview of some of the most significant issues facing academic leaders today: academic freedom and free expression, faculty searches, promotion and tenure, discrimination, contracts, intellectual property, conflicts of interest and commitment, e-mail, student records, and managing the student-institutional relationship. The intent is not to provide legal advice but to raise awareness of key legal issues and how and when they may arise. The briefing concludes with general recommendations regarding how to work with institutional counsel, who can be a key partner in helping academic leaders avoid or manage legal risks and liability.

Journal: 978 1 57922 207 9 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 404 2 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
E-mail and Effective Communication
Executive Summary E-mail has become the default method for almost all forms of academic communication. It is easy to use, quick, and has wide reach. But the same key features that make e-mail so effective also make it problematic for academic communication (e.g., e-mail is the wrong medium for discussing and deciding complex issues). This briefing explores the fundamental communication features of e-mail, discusses e-mail communication in specific academic contexts, and offers practical ideas and improvements on e-mail use for academic leaders. Attention is given to issues related to handling large attachments, the volume of e-mail received by academic administrators, and when to use other forms of communication or consider other digital technologies. In addition, legal issues as well as matters where the chair serves as both advisor and mediator in digital communication situations are considered. This briefing closes with a discussion of the characteristics of today’s “net generation” and suggests uses for some of the newer technologies favored by this group, such as social networks.

Journal: 978 1 57922 208 6 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 405 9 / $10.00
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Effective Practices for Academic Leaders
Fund-Raising: A New World for Department Chairs
Executive Summary With the tectonic shift in higher education funding from a social good supported by public funds to a private benefit supported by individuals and private entities, institutional fund-raising is undergoing change. Fund-raising, which was once almost exclusively the concern of independent colleges and universities, is now an increasingly important preoccupation of public institutions. As this shift has taken place, the tasks associated with fund-raising have become the responsibility of departments and chairs as well as the concern of administrators and professional fund-raisers. In this briefing, I provide a historical review of funding patterns in higher education, followed by a discussion on how chairs can lead their departmental search for external funds to meet operating and capital budget needs. I then review the fundamentals of fund-raising, its terminology, and the rules that govern expenditures in academic departments. I also explain how chairs and departments can put their ideas into action to expand department resources, by responding to opportunities and/or designing their own plan. Finally, I provide suggestions for dealing with some of the ethical issues that can arise.

Journal: 978 1 57922 209 3 / $20.00
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E-Publication (PDF): 978 1 57922 406 6 / $10.00
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The Elective Carnegie Community Engagement Classification
Constructing a Successful Application for First-Time and Re-Classification Applicants
The Carnegie Engagement Classification is designed to be a form of evidence-based documentation that a campus meets the criteria to be recognized as a community engaged institution. Editors John Saltmarsh and Mathew B. Johnson use their extensive experience working with the Carnegie Engagement Classification to offer a collection of resources for institutions that are interested in making a first-time or reclassification application for this recognition. Contributors offer insight on approaches to collecting the materials needed for an application and strategies for creating a complete and successful application. Chapters include detailed descriptions of what happened on campuses that succeeded in their application attempts and even reflection from a campus that failed on their first application. Readers can make use of worksheets at the end of each chapter to organize their own classification efforts.

Cloth: 978 1 945459 13 9 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 945459 14 6 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 945459 16 0 / $31.99
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Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education
Putting Psychometrics to Work
Foreword by Michael J. Kolen
Co-published with AIR. Published in association with AAC&U Assessment and accountability are now inescapable features of the landscape of higher education, and ensuring that these assessments are psychometrically sound has become a high priority for accrediting agencies and therefore also for higher education institutions. Bringing together the higher education assessment literature with the psychometric literature, this book focuses on how to practice sound assessment. This volume provides comprehensive and detailed descriptions of tools for and approaches to assessing student learning outcomes in higher education. The book is guided by the core purpose of assessment, which is to enable faculty, administrators, and student affairs professionals with the information they need to increase student learning by making changes in policies, curricula, and other programs. The book is divided into three sections: overview, assessment in higher education, and case studies. The central section looks at direct and indirect measures of student learning, and how to assure the validity, reliability, and fairness of both types. The first six chapters (the first two sections) alternate chapters written by experts in assessment in higher education and experts in psychometrics. The remaining three chapters are applications of assessment practices in three higher education institutions. Finally, the book includes a glossary of key terms in the field.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 367 6 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 370 6 / $27.99
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Establishing the Family-Friendly Campus
Models for Effective Practice
The impact of changing demographics in higher education, and the importance of family-friendly policies, is well documented. There is an urgent need to keep PhDs in the higher education sector, to recruit talented scholars into academia, and retain them over the course of their academic careers. The key is instituting policies to enable all constituencies to balance work and personal responsibilities. This book covers the range of issues faced by all generations in academe, from PhD students, to the “sandwich generation” (those caring for children and aging parents simultaneously) through to older faculty and administrators. It addresses the causes for women faculty with children leaving the academy at a disproportionately higher rate than men, the conflicts women face between academic work and motherhood, and the difficulties they encounter in reentering the academy after having left the professoriate. In examining the need for family-friendly policies, this book documents the “best practices” currently in use at institutions across the United States. Each chapter highlights practices and programs from a variety of institutions and institutional types that address the needs of a more inclusive family-friendly campus and offers suggestions to others who are implementing similar change on their campuses. These examples provide context so that readers no longer have to develop practices in isolation, and without evidence of their effectiveness. The editors suggest that the most successful campuses are those that utilize a work-life systems framework to meet the needs of its employees. They also point to future growth trends, including expanding the focus from faculty and staff to incorporate all in the campus community This book offers guidance to department chairs, deans, faculty, administrators, and graduate students on setting a family-friendly agenda, and models for implementation. Contributors include: Emily Arms -- Kathleen Beauchesne -- Jill Bickett -- Sharon A. Dannels -- Mariko Dawson Zare -- Karie Frasch -- Marc Goulden -- Jeni Hart -- Caryn Jung -- Jaime Lester -- Sharon A. McDade -- Jean McLaughlin -- Mary Ann Mason -- Sharon Page-Medrich -- Kate Quinn -- Margaret Sallee -- Randi Shapiro -- Angelica Stacy -- David L. Swihart -- Gloria D. Thomas -- Darci Thompson

Cloth: 978 1 57922 330 4 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 331 1 / $35.00
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Excellence in Higher Education
Workbook and Scoring Instructions
This Workbook accompanies the new (eighth) edition of the Excellence in Higher Education Guide: A Framework for the Design, Assessment and Continuous Improvement of Institutions, Departments and Programs. It is generously illustrated with PowerPoint presentations for use in facilitating workshops and includes additional background on the each of the EHE categories and structured exercises that can be used by individuals or a group context to support the assessment and planning process within a particular program, department or institutions. The scoring guidelines will help you interpret results and gauge your institution's performance. The eighth edition of Excellence in Higher Education updates and extends the classic EHE series, including a broad and integrated approach to design, assessment, planning, and improvement of colleges and universities of all types, as well as individual academic, student affairs, administrative and services units. The framework included in the Guide is adaptable to institutions and units with any mission, and is consistent with the current directions within regional and programmatic accreditation. Click here for more information on the Guide. The eighth edition series also includes Facilitator’s Materials (available only by download).

Paper: 978 1 62036 400 0 / $25.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 402 4 / $19.99
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Excellence in Higher Education
Facilitator's Materials
This ebook will be very useful for those who lead an EHE program. These facilitator’s materials will also make it possible to customize the EHE materials and adapt exercises to the needs of particular organizations. The eighth edition of Excellence in Education updates and extends the classic EHE series, including a broad and integrated approach to design, assessment, planning, and improvement of colleges and universities of all types, as well as individual academic, student affairs, administrative and services units. The framework included in the Guide is adaptable to institutions and units with any mission, and is consistent with the current directions within regional and programmatic accreditation. Click here for more information on the Guide. The eighth edition series also includes a Workbook and Scoring Instructions (available in print and electronic format. The Facilitator's Materials are also sold as an ebook bundle with the Guide.

E-Book: 978 1 62036 406 2 / $19.99
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Excellence in Higher Education Guide
A Framework for the Design, Assessment, and Continuing Improvement of Institutions, Departments, and Programs
The new (eighth) edition of the Excellence in Higher Education Guide: A Framework for the Design, Assessment and Continuous Improvement of Institutions, Departments and Programs updates and extends the classic EHE series. This edition includes a broad and integrated approach to design, assessment, planning, and improvement of colleges and universities of all types, as well as individual academic, student affairs, administrative and services units. The framework included in the Guide is adaptable to institutions and units with any mission, and is consistent with the current directions within regional and programmatic accreditation. Based on the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award framework, this bestseller is the definitive tool for college and university administrators. The flexibility of the EHE model makes it appropriate for use with administrative or academic departments, with administrative or faculty councils or senate, and with programs, centers, or institutes. Moreover, the framework can be used by an entire college or university or with a particular department, division or campus. The EHE program includes everything you need to conduct a self-assessment workshop. The Guide provides facilitators with a solid understanding of the EHE model, providing detailed guidance in each of the seven areas: • Leadership • Purposes and Plans • Beneficiary and Constituency Relationships • Programs and Services • Faculty/Staff and Workplace • Metrics, Assessment and Analysis • Outcomes and Achievements The eighth edition series also includes a Workbook and Scoring Instructions (available in print and electronic format) and Facilitator’s Materials (available only by download). The Guide is also sold as an ebook bundle with the Facilitator's materials.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 395 9 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 396 6 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 398 0 / $31.99
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Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Bridging Differences, Catalyzing Change
Foreword by Patricia Gurin
Intergroup dialogue has emerged as an effective educational and community building method to bring together members of diverse social and cultural groups to engage in learning together so that they may work collectively and individually to promote greater diversity, equality and justice. Intergroup dialogues bring together individuals from different identity groups (such as people of color and white people; women and men; lesbian, gay, and bisexual people and heterosexual people), and uses explicit pedagogy that involves three important features: content learning, structured interaction, and facilitative guidance. The least understood role in the pedagogy is that of facilitation. This volume, the first dedicated entirely to intergroup dialogue facilitation, draws on the experiences of contributors and on emerging research to address the multi-dimensional role of facilitators and co-facilitators, the training and support of facilitators, and ways of improving practice in both educational and community settings. It constitutes a comprehensive guide for practitioners, covering the theoretical, conceptual, and practical knowledge they need. Presenting the work and insights of scholars, practitioners and scholar-practitioners who train facilitators for intergroup dialogues, this book bridges the theoretical and conceptual foundations of intergroup relations and social justice education with training models for intergroup dialogue facilitation. It is intended for staff, faculty, and administrators in higher education, and community agencies, as well as for human resources departments in workplaces. Contributors: Charles Behling, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Barry Checkoway, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, School of Social Work Mark Chesler, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Keri De Jong, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education Roger Fisher, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Nichola G. Fulmer Patricia Gurin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, The Program on Intergroup Relations Tanya Kachwaha, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education Christina Kelleher, Institute for Sustained Dialogue, Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Ariel Kirkland, Occidental College, Student facilitator James Knauer, Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, Democracy Lab Joycelyn Landrum-Brown, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Program on Intergroup Relations Shaquanda D. Lindsey, Occidental College, Student facilitator David J. Martineau, Washington University, St. Louis, School of Social Work Kelly E. Maxwell Biren (Ratnesh) A. Nagda Teddy Nemeroff, Institute for Sustained Dialogue, Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Romina Pacheco, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education Priya Parker, Institute for Sustained Dialogue, Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Jaclyn Rodríguez, Occidental College, Department of Psychology Andrea C. Rodríguez-Scheel, Occidental College, Student facilitator Michael S. Spencer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, School of Social Work Monita C. Thompson Norma Timbang Thai Hung V. Tran Carolyn Vasques-Scalera, Independent Scholar Thomas E. Walker, University of Denver, Center for Multicultural Excellence Kathleen Wong (Lau), Arizona State University/Western Michigan University, Intergroup Relations Center/ Intercultural Communication Anna M. Yeakley, Independent Intergroup Dialogue Consultant Ximena Zúñiga, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Education

Cloth: 978 1 57922 290 1 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 291 8 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 524 7 / $25.99
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For-Profit Colleges and Universities
Their Markets, Regulation, Performance, and Place in Higher Education
Foreword by Marc Tucker
Do for-profit colleges and universities (FPCUs) pose a threat to traditional providers of higher education, or do they play a vital role at a time when the capacity of public and private non-profits to meet demand is constrained? With the US no longer the leader in developing a college-educated workforce, can FPCUs help redress the competitive gap? What can be learned from the management practices and growth of FPCUs – that now number close to 3,000 institutions in the US – whose increase in enrollments has out-paced that of traditional institutions, and who now grant around 8% of all degrees? This book offers a clear-eyed and balanced analysis of for-profit colleges and universities, reviewing their history, business strategies, and management practices; setting them in the context of marketplace conditions, the framework of public policy and government regulations; and viewing them in the light of the public good. Individual chapters variously explore FPCU’s governance, how they develop courses and programs, and the way they define faculty work; present findings from in-depth interviews with part-time and full-time faculty to understand how external forces and the imperative of profit generation affect faculty roles and responsibilities of faculty; analyze policy considerations that affect FPCUs, including federal regulation and oversight, accountability and assessment, and the legal and regulatory issues FPCUs face internationally; and finally address the notion of academic freedom and the distribution of public monies to FPCUs. Looking beyond FPCUs’ current strategy of offering career programming to non-traditional students, the book reveals how they are positioning themselves to meet future market needs by developing new programs targeting a wider group of students. Recognizing that FPCUs are more developing than fully developed, the authors convey both the current state and the unresolved issues facing these businesses, and, in so doing, surface enduring topics that face all of post-secondary education.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 424 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 425 7 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 528 5 / $25.99
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A Good Job
Campus Employment as a High-Impact Practice
Foreword by George D. Kuh
For many students, working while in college is a defining characteristic of the undergraduate experience. However, student workers often view campus employment as a money-making opportunity rather than a chance for personal development. Likewise, institutions often neglect to consider campus jobs as a means to education and student engagement. It is the distinction between work for remuneration and work for personal development which shapes much of the discussion of student employment throughout A Good Job. This book makes the case for campus employment as a high-impact practice in higher education and provides models for institutional efforts to implement new student employment strategies. Carefully designed campus employment opportunities can have numerous benefits, including career exploration and preparation, learning, and increased engagement leading to increased retention. The authors make the case that employment can and should be a purposeful and powerful component in any higher education institution’s efforts to support student learning, development, and success. This book is an excellent resource for anyone interested in capitalizing on the developmental and learning potential of student employment on campus.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 471 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 472 7 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 474 1 / $27.99
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A Guide for Leaders in Higher Education
Core Concepts, Competencies, and Tools
Foreword by Doug Lederman
At a time when higher education faces the unprecedented challenges of declining revenues and increased scrutiny, questions about access, cost, and the value of degrees, and the imperative to educate a more diverse student body, there is an urgent need for leadership that is conversant with, and able to deploy, the competencies, management tools, and strategic skills that go beyond the technical or disciplinary preparation and “on the job” training that most leaders have received. This book is intended as a practical resource for academic and administrative leaders in higher education who seek guidance in dealing with today’s complexity, opportunities, and demands. It is also addressed to those who aspire to hold positions of leadership, and to the many faculty and staff members who serve in informal leadership roles within their departments, disciplines, or institutions. Additionally, the book serves as a guide and resource for those responsible for the design and implementation of leadership development programs in higher education. While recognizing the differences in mission and circumstance across institutional types, the authors begin by offering a foundational understanding of higher education as a sector, the political, social, and economic climate in which it operates, and the potential opportunities ahead. Subsequent sections of the book cover leadership concepts and competencies, along with a series of applied tools for leadership and organizational effectiveness. Each chapter concludes with related case studies and guiding questions for further reflection. The final section highlights models for developing institutional leadership programs that progressively meet the needs of leaders along their careers. The content and format of this book reflect the authors’ views that leadership development is most effective when it is an intentional, reflective, and systematic experience. While they espouse the practice of general principles of leadership, they also take into account the unique context of higher education with its numerous internal and external stakeholders, multiple missions, particular organizational governance, and a culture that fosters individual autonomy and creativity.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 391 1 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 392 8 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 394 2 / $31.99
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A Guide to Building Education Partnerships
Navigating Diverse Cultural Contexts to Turn Challenge into Promise
Foreword by Judith A. Ramaley
Education partnerships are central to – and often a requirement of – most education reform initiatives promoted by state and local governments, by foundations, and by business funders. Many fail for failure to understand the dynamics of their complex relationships. This book provides insights and guidance to enable prospective and existing education partners to develop answers to the questions that are critical to success: Why engage in this partnership? How can you communicate the potential benefits of partnership to motivate teachers, faculty, administrators, and community members? How do you select the best organizational structure and procedures for a partnership? How can you maintain open, deliberative discussion while respecting different histories and cultures? How can you produce compelling evidence that the partnership is worthwhile? Based on their observation of a five-year-long publicly funded partnership, research data, and the literature, the authors identify the principles that they consider critical to answering these questions. The authors do not minimize the differences and complexities inherent in partnership work, because they believe that doing so would be to present coherence and homogeneity where none exists. Instead, they seek to make evident how these principles underlie many different partnership situations. Thus, rather than presenting a package of best practices, or a cookie-cutter approach, this book presents the organizational principles for planning and implementing education partnerships, along with sets of strategies for working through them. The authors present the diagnostic tools for undertaking a deliberate and research-based approach to planning, designing, and managing a partnership. By surfacing participants’ often-differing motivations, and the practices and assumptions they bring to the table, the book provides the foundation for developing a constructive relationship. In scope, the book extends beyond school-university partnerships to include schools’ collaboration with state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, and the business sector.

Paper: 978 1 57922 472 1 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 490 5 / $25.99
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Heeding New Voices
Academic Careers for a New Generation
Reports on structured interviews conducted with new faculty and graduate students who will be the professoriate of the future. Considers what changes need to be made in the faculty career to make it more enticing, self-renewing, and resilient for the individual and to provide greater flexibility for institutions. Includes a "Principles of Good Practice: Supporting Early-Career Faculty" section also available separately at www.aahe.org/ffrr/principles_brochure.htm

Paper: 978 1 56377 090 6 / $15.00
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High-Impact Practices in Online Education
Research and Best Practices
Foreword by Kelvin Thompson
This volume offers the first comprehensive guide to how high-impact practices (HIPs) are being implemented in online environments and how they can be adjusted to meet the needs of online learners. This multi-disciplinary approach will assist faculty and administrators to effectively implement HIPs in distance education courses and online programs. With a chapter devoted to each of the eleven HIPs, this collection offers guidance that takes into account the differences between e-learners and traditional on-campus students. A primary goal of High-Impact Practices Online is to share the ways in which HIPs may need to be amended to meet the needs of online learners. Through specific examples and practical suggestions in each chapter, readers are introduced to concrete strategies for transitioning HIPs to the online environment that can be utilized across a range of disciplines and institution types. Each chapter of High-Impact Practices Online also references the most recent and relevant literature on each HIP so that readers are brought up to date on what makes online HIPs successful. The book provides guidance on how best to implement HIPs to increase retention and completion for online learners.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 846 6 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 847 3 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 849 7 / $27.99
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Higher Education at Risk
Strategies to Improve Outcomes, Reduce Tuition, and Stay Competitive in a Disruptive Environment
Sandra Featherman believes that colleges are in denial about the severity of the threats to the current model of higher education. Based on her own experience as a president, as a trustee, and as a board member who has worked in private and public universities – and on interviews with the presidents of major institutions – she offers both a trenchant analysis of those threats and clear prescriptions about the painful but necessary decisions that colleges need to make to ensure they remain viable, accessible and affordable, and deliver a high-quality education. Sandra Featherman considers higher education to be at a game-changing moment. When markets don’t function well – as is the case with today’s college marketplace with offerings that cost too much and return too little – it opens the door to new types of suppliers, who offer new ways of providing what students are looking for, particularly the increasing cohort of mature, working students. In the face of new competitors – for-profit education companies, technology start-ups, and foreign universities vying for international students – trustees and senior level administrators are generally stuck in a traditional ethos and with decision-making processes unsuited to these times. They know what used to work, and find it easier to follow old ways than to make the difficult transition to new ways of delivering education. She lays out a strategy: that emphasizes the centrality of students and how to provide them with the most effective learning environment; that is clear-eyed about focusing on the core missions, and abandoning practices that constrain or impede them; and that requires constant self-monitoring to learn from and act upon what works. She offers a blueprint for redesigning institutions, for paring away what is unnecessary and cost ineffective, and for adopting the best technologies, all in the service of developing meaningful degree programs at an affordable price, and widening access for under-represented groups. She ranges over the implications of budget decisions, accreditation, and MOOCs; addresses government regulation and tuition costs; presents promising new models; and concludes with 11 key recommendations that should be heeded by all higher education administrators and trustees.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 067 5 / $49.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 070 5 / $39.95
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The Impact of Culture on Organizational Decision-Making
Theory and Practice in Higher Education
Colleges and universities are currently undergoing the most significant challenges they have faced since World War II. Rising costs, increased competition from for-profit providers, the impact of technology, and the changing desires and needs of consumers have combined to create a dynamic tension for those who work in, and study, postsecondary education. What worked yesterday is unlikely to work tomorrow. The status quo or bromides such as “stay the course” are insufficient responses in a market that demands creativity and innovation if an organization does not simply wish to survive, but thrive. Managerial responses or top-down linear decisions are antithetical to academic organizations and most likely recipes for disaster. In today’s “flat world”, decision-making for most organizations has become less hierarchical and more decentralized. Understanding this trend is of particular importance for organizations with traditions of shared governance. The message of this book is that understanding organizational culture is critical for those who recognize that academe must change, but are unsure how to make that change happen. Even the most seasoned college and university administrators and professors often ask themselves, “What holds this place together?” The author’s answer is that an organization’s culture is the glue of academic life. Paradoxically, this “glue” does not make things get stuck, but unstuck. An understanding of culture enables an organization’s participants to interpret the institution to themselves and others, and in consequence, to propel the institution forward. An organization’s culture is reflected in what is done, how it is done, and who is involved in doing it. It concerns decisions, actions, and communication on an instrumental and symbolic level. This book considers various facets of academic culture, discusses how to study it, how to analyze it, and how to improve it in order to move colleges and universities aggressively into the future while maintaining core academic values. This book presents updated versions of eight key articles on organizational culture in higher education by William G. Tierney. The new introduction that sets them in the context of current and future challenges will add further value to articles that are already in high demand.

Paper: 978 1 57922 287 1 / $31.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 499 4 / $25.99
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Journal Keeping
How to Use Reflective Writing for Learning, Teaching, Professional Insight and Positive Change
** By the authors of the acclaimed Introduction to Rubrics ** Major growth of interest in keeping journals or diaries for personal reflection and growth; and as a teaching tool ** Will appeal to college faculty, administrators and teachers One of the most powerful ways to learn, reflect and make sense of our lives is through journal keeping. This book presents the potential uses and benefits of journals for personal and professional development—particularly for those in academic life; and demonstrates journals’ potential to foster college students’ learning, fluency and voice, and creative thinking. In professional life, a journal helps to organize, prioritize and address the many expectations of a faculty member’s or administrator’s roles. Journals are effective for developing time management skills, building problem-solving skills, fostering insight, and decreasing stress. Both writing and rereading journal entries allow the journal keeper to document thinking; to track changes and review observations; and to examine assumptions and so gain fresh perspectives and insights over past events. The authors present the background to help readers make an informed decision about the value of journals and to determine whether journals will fit appropriately with their teaching objectives or help manage their personal and professional lives. They offer insights and advice on selecting the format or formats and techniques most appropriate for the reader’s purposes.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 215 4 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 216 1 / $27.00
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A Leader's Guide to Competency-Based Education
From Inception to Implementation
Foreword by Amy Laitinen
As interest in competency-based education (CBE) continues to grow by leaps and bounds, the need for a practical resource to guide development of high-quality CBE programs led the authors to write this book. Until now, there has been no how-to manual that captures in one place a big picture view of CBE along with the down-to-earth means for building a CBE program. A variety of pressures are driving the growth in CBE, including the need for alternatives to the current model of higher education (with its dismal completion rates); the potential to better manage the iron triangle of costs, access, and quality; the need for graduates to be better prepared for the workforce; and the demands of adult learners for programs with the flexible time and personalized learning that CBE offers. Designed to help institutional leaders become more competent in designing, building, and scaling high-quality competency-based education (CBE) programs, this book provides context, guidelines, and process. The process is based on ten design elements that emerged from research funded by the Gates Foundation, and sponsored by AAC&U, ACE, EDUCAUSE, and the Competency-Based Education Network (C-BEN), with thought partners CAEL and Quality Matters. In short, the book will serve administrators, higher education leaders, faculty, staff, and others who have an interest in CBE by: • Giving context to enable the audience to discover the importance of each design element and to help frame the CBE program (the “why”); • Providing models, checklists, and considerations to determine the “what” component for each design element; • Sharing outlines and templates for the design elements to enable institutions to build quality, relevant, and rigorous CBE programs (the “how”).

Cloth: 978 1 62036 592 2 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 593 9 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 595 3 / $23.99
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Leadership Theory and the Community College
Applying Theory to Practice
Foreword by Eduardo J. Padrón
This book presents leaders and aspiring leaders in community colleges with a theoretical and practical framework for analyzing their leadership styles, and determining the dimensions of leadership they need to improve in order to strengthen their capacity to resolve complex issues and effectively guide their institutions. It does so through presenting theories about leadership that are congruent with the notions of equity, access, diversity, ethics, critical inquiry, transformational change, and social justice that drive the missions of community colleges, and at the same time provides the reader with the strategic skills to prepare for and navigate the profound changes ahead. Readers will gain an understanding of how to use theory as a tool to guide their practice, better understand the intricacies of the issues confronting them, the power dynamics and organizational context in which they operate, predict potential outcomes, and develop processes to achieve desired outcomes. Utilizing theory in conjunction with case study analysis provides community college leaders with the tools needed to comprehensively interrogate and inform decision-making processes. The authors provide a number of rich and realistically complex case studies, all of which are situated in a community college environment, to which readers can apply the various theories and perspectives, develop their view about the principles and actions most likely to lead to satisfactory outcomes, and hone the approaches to leadership that are authentic to them, and effective. The authors aim to help readers develop the multi-faceted approach to leadership that is essential to running complex organizations. They aim to promote development of the “whole” leader through a three-fold framework of theory, practice, and introspection in context of institutional change. In doing so, leaders will be better equipped to lead community colleges in challenging times. The authors tie AACC’s competencies to the leadership theories they cover, as well as to the analysis of the case studies, and leadership inventories, as an essential framework for developing the skill sets to enact the community college mission. The book is suitable for personal reading and reflection, institutional leadership retreats and training, and as a text for higher education courses.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 631 2 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 632 9 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 634 3 / $23.99
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Leading Academic Change
Vision, Strategy, Transformation
Written by a sitting college president who has presided over transformative change at a state university, this book takes on the big questions and issues of change and change management, what needs to be done and how to do it. Writing in a highly accessible style, the author recommends changes for higher education such as the reallocation of resources to support full-time faculty members in foundation-level courses, navigable pathways from community college to the university, infusion rather than proliferation of courses, and the role of state universities in countering the disappearance of the middle class. The book describes how these changes can be made, as well as why we must make them if our society is to thrive in the twenty-first century.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 567 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 568 7 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 570 0 / $23.99
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Leading Internationalization
A Handbook for International Education Leaders
Foreword by E. Gordon Gee
Afterword by Allan E. Goodman
Co-published with AIEA. What do university leaders need to know and be able to do to internationalize their institutions? This volume provides senior professionals in international education, increasingly known as Senior International Officers (SIOs), with the foundational knowledge that informs leadership practices, together with suggested strategies for implementing and developing the wide range of functions, activities and skills associated with comprehensive internationalization that will ensure effective support for their institutions’ educational mission in today’s globalized and interdependent world. This book addresses strategic leadership issues in internationalization including strategic planning, shaping the curriculum, recruiting students, risk management, and developing partnerships. Throughout, the Association of International Education Administrators’ (AIEA) Standards of Professional Practice for SIOs and International Education Leaders (reproduced in the appendix) are integrated as a point of reference, providing a much needed guide for international education leaders. This resource is a vital starting point for anyone in a senior leadership role in higher education, as well as for anyone desiring to understand more about this key leadership position essential to higher education institutions in developing institutional global capacity and in educating global-ready graduates.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 783 4 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 784 1 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 786 5 / $23.99
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Living-Learning Communities That Work
A Research-Based Model for Design, Delivery, and Assessment
Foreword by Jillian Kinzie
Afterword by Jon Dooley, Peter Felten
Co-published with ACUHO-I In 2007, the American Association of Colleges and Universities named learning communities a high-impact practice because of the potential of these communities to provide coherence to and ultimately improve undergraduate education. Institutional leaders have demonstrated a commitment to providing LLCs, but they currently do so primarily with anecdotal information to guide their work. As a result, there is substantial variation in organizational structure, collaboration, academic and social environments, programmatic integration, student outcomes, and overall quality related to LLC participation. To establish a stronger, more unified basis for designing and delivering effective LLCs, the authors of Living-Learning Communities that Work collaborated on the development of a comprehensive empirical framework for achieving the integrating potential of LLCs. This framework is designed to help practitioners guide the design, delivery, and assessment of LLCs. This book thoughtfully combines research and field-tested practice to document the essential components for best practices in living learning communities and presents them as a clear blueprint –the LLC best practices model – for LLC design. Practitioners, researchers, and institutional leaders can use the book as a guide to more effectively allocate resources to create and sustain LLCs and to realize the potential of these communities to improve undergraduate education.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 600 4 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 601 1 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 603 5 / $27.99
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Making Outreach Visible
A Guide to Documenting Professional Service and Outreach
Faculty professional service/outreach won’t get the respect and reward accorded other forms of scholarship until it can be documented and subjected to peer review. This companion volume to Lynton’s Making the Case for Professional Service delivers specifics for developing such a review process. The protocol calls for teams of faculty and administrators to reach consensus on goals, definitions, and logistics through guided reflection and discussion of prototype portfolios. Sixteen prototypes are included in the volume, the product of a three-year Kellogg-funded project.

Paper: 978 1 56377 045 6 / $31.50
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Making the Case for Professional Service
Professional service can be an intellectually challenging activity, as well as a critical element in fulfilling campus missions... if properly conceptualized, performed, evaluated, and rewarded. This book explains why professional service is needed, and how it can be documented and evaluated, with case study examples of five actual projects. A companion volume to "Making Outreach Visible".

Paper: 978 1 56377 033 3 / $19.95
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Managing the Unthinkable
Crisis Preparation and Response for Campus Leaders
Foreword by John G. Peters
Crises are no strangers on campuses—whether the deaths of students, severe weather events, athletic wrongdoing, crime, or student or employee malfeasance. How leaders respond can save lives, strengthen the institution, and comfort the community—or compromise reputations and result in scandal. Risk management and readiness are not often at the top of the list of what presidents and their boards must do, but in a time of ongoing change, instantaneous communication, and media scrutiny, they risk their jobs and their institutional reputation if they do not heed the messages conveyed in this book. Gretchen Bataille and Diana Cordova, with extensive and varied experiences that include a university presidency, directing senior leadership programs, and counseling presidents and senior administrators faced with critical campus events – together with 22 presidents, seasoned leaders in higher education, and media experts – provide forthright, firsthand advice on preparing for and managing a crisis, as well on handling the emotional, and often long-term, toll that can result from dramatic events on campus. Through the examples of those who have successfully managed crises, this book provides expert insights and guidance on preparedness, assigning roles and responsibilities, and planning for contingencies ahead of time so that, in the moment, when there is pressure for immediate response that will be scrutinized by the media, by the public, and by the local constituencies, leaders can act with confidence. The contributors emphasize the crucial importance of ethical behavior, the need for clear protocols for how all employees should handle problematic issues, and the need for mechanisms that allow employees and students to report problems without fear of retribution. Creating an atmosphere of transparency, accountability, and ethical behavior isn’t something a leader does when a scandal strikes to protect a reputation; it’s what leaders must do to reinforce their good name every day. For senior leaders and board members not in the throes of managing a crisis, this book outlines what needs to be done to be prepared and offers extensive resources for further reading.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 071 2 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 072 9 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 074 3 / $31.99
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Mapping the Field of Adult and Continuing Education
An International Compendium
Foreword by Steven B. Frye
Co-published with The field of Adult and Continuing Education (ACE) has long been influential beyond its already porous borders and continues to be a source of important ideas, inspiration, and innovative practices for those in disciplines such as educational administration, social work, nursing, and counseling. Recognizing this, the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education commissioned the editors to create this compendium, which provides an invaluable resource to readers already established in the field, those entering the field, and to myriad neighbors of the field as well. This four-volume compendium (also available as a combined e-book) brings together a host of national and international contributors to map the field of ACE in a series of brief articles addressing key theories and practices across its many domains and settings. These are arranged in four volumes, available either individually or as a set: Volume One: Adult Learners Volume Two: Teaching and Learning Volume Three: Leadership and Administration Volume Four: Inquiry and Influences The volume on Adult Learners will include articles addressing topics such as adult development, diversity, learning abilities, the influence of personality on learning, and the role of experience in adult learning. By far the largest segment of learners in society, and currently the largest segment of college students as well, a better understanding of the adult learner is vital for educators of all kinds. Volume two addresses Teaching and Learning topics ranging from methods and roles to programs and materials. Encompassing formal and informal learning, as well as the variety of focus and setting, from cultural to occupational, this volume explores the wide range of theory and practice in ACE. Issues of Leadership and Administration such as planning and resource allocation, organizational change and culture, and the value of a shared vision for all stakeholders are addressed in the third volume. From practical matters like staffing and volunteers, to big-picture issues such as alternative visions for the future of the field, this volume offers vital knowledge and insight. The final volume, on Inquiry and Influences, examines the context, trends, and methods of research and evaluation in the field’s many domains. Wide-ranging inquiry has always been a hallmark of ACE, and only continues to grow along with the recognition of the importance of adult learning for learners and for the society as a whole. All four volumes are available as a single e-book, to make the most of the inter-relatedness of the various topics. This version uses live links in the table of contents and combined index (as well as keywords at the start of each article) to enable readers to follow their own topical interests and thus create unique learning pathways for themselves.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 524 3 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 525 0 / $28.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 527 4 / $22.99
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Mapping the Field of Adult and Continuing Education
An International Compendium
Foreword by Steven B. Frye
Co-published with The field of Adult and Continuing Education (ACE) has long been influential beyond its already porous borders and continues to be a source of important ideas, inspiration, and innovative practices for those in disciplines such as educational administration, social work, nursing, and counseling. Recognizing this, the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education commissioned the editors to create this compendium, which provides an invaluable resource to readers already established in the field, those entering the field, and to myriad neighbors of the field as well. This four-volume compendium (also available as a combined e-book) brings together a host of national and international contributors to map the field of ACE in a series of brief articles addressing key theories and practices across its many domains and settings. These are arranged in four volumes, available either individually or as a set: Volume One: Adult Learners Volume Two: Teaching and Learning Volume Three: Leadership and Administration Volume Four: Inquiry and Influences The volume on Adult Learners will include articles addressing topics such as adult development, diversity, learning abilities, the influence of personality on learning, and the role of experience in adult learning. By far the largest segment of learners in society, and currently the largest segment of college students as well, a better understanding of the adult learner is vital for educators of all kinds. Volume two addresses Teaching and Learning topics ranging from methods and roles to programs and materials. Encompassing formal and informal learning, as well as the variety of focus and setting, from cultural to occupational, this volume explores the wide range of theory and practice in ACE. Issues of Leadership and Administration such as planning and resource allocation, organizational change and culture, and the value of a shared vision for all stakeholders are addressed in the third volume. From practical matters like staffing and volunteers, to big-picture issues such as alternative visions for the future of the field, this volume offers vital knowledge and insight. The final volume, on Inquiry and Influences, examines the context, trends, and methods of research and evaluation in the field’s many domains. Wide-ranging inquiry has always been a hallmark of ACE, and only continues to grow along with the recognition of the importance of adult learning for learners and for the society as a whole. All four volumes are available as a single e-book, to make the most of the inter-relatedness of the various topics. This version uses live links in the table of contents and combined index (as well as keywords at the start of each article) to enable readers to follow their own topical interests and thus create unique learning pathways for themselves.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 528 1 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 529 8 / $28.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 531 1 / $22.99
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Mapping the Field of Adult and Continuing Education
An International Compendium
Foreword by Steven B. Frye
Co-published with The field of Adult and Continuing Education (ACE) has long been influential beyond its already porous borders and continues to be a source of important ideas, inspiration, and innovative practices for those in disciplines such as educational administration, social work, nursing, and counseling. Recognizing this, the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education commissioned the editors to create this compendium, which provides an invaluable resource to readers already established in the field, those entering the field, and to myriad neighbors of the field as well. This four-volume compendium (also available as a combined e-book) brings together a host of national and international contributors to map the field of ACE in a series of brief articles addressing key theories and practices across its many domains and settings. These are arranged in four volumes, available either individually or as a set: Volume One: Adult Learners Volume Two: Teaching and Learning Volume Three: Leadership and Administration Volume Four: Inquiry and Influences The volume on Adult Learners will include articles addressing topics such as adult development, diversity, learning abilities, the influence of personality on learning, and the role of experience in adult learning. By far the largest segment of learners in society, and currently the largest segment of college students as well, a better understanding of the adult learner is vital for educators of all kinds. Volume two addresses Teaching and Learning topics ranging from methods and roles to programs and materials. Encompassing formal and informal learning, as well as the variety of focus and setting, from cultural to occupational, this volume explores the wide range of theory and practice in ACE. Issues of Leadership and Administration such as planning and resource allocation, organizational change and culture, and the value of a shared vision for all stakeholders are addressed in the third volume. From practical matters like staffing and volunteers, to big-picture issues such as alternative visions for the future of the field, this volume offers vital knowledge and insight. The final volume, on Inquiry and Influences, examines the context, trends, and methods of research and evaluation in the field’s many domains. Wide-ranging inquiry has always been a hallmark of ACE, and only continues to grow along with the recognition of the importance of adult learning for learners and for the society as a whole. All four volumes are available as a single e-book, to make the most of the inter-relatedness of the various topics. This version uses live links in the table of contents and combined index (as well as keywords at the start of each article) to enable readers to follow their own topical interests and thus create unique learning pathways for themselves.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 532 8 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 533 5 / $28.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 535 9 / $22.99
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Mapping the Field of Adult and Continuing Education
An International Compendium
Foreword by Steven B. Frye
Co-published with \ The field of Adult and Continuing Education (ACE) has long been influential beyond its already porous borders and continues to be a source of important ideas, inspiration, and innovative practices for those in disciplines such as educational administration, social work, nursing, and counseling. Recognizing this, the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education commissioned the editors to create this compendium, which provides an invaluable resource to readers already established in the field, those entering the field, and to myriad neighbors of the field as well. This four-volume compendium (also available as a combined e-book) brings together a host of national and international contributors to map the field of ACE in a series of brief articles addressing key theories and practices across its many domains and settings. These are arranged in four volumes, available either individually or as a set: Volume One: Adult Learners Volume Two: Teaching and Learning Volume Three: Leadership and Administration Volume Four: Inquiry and Influences The volume on Adult Learners will include articles addressing topics such as adult development, diversity, learning abilities, the influence of personality on learning, and the role of experience in adult learning. By far the largest segment of learners in society, and currently the largest segment of college students as well, a better understanding of the adult learner is vital for educators of all kinds. Volume two addresses Teaching and Learning topics ranging from methods and roles to programs and materials. Encompassing formal and informal learning, as well as the variety of focus and setting, from cultural to occupational, this volume explores the wide range of theory and practice in ACE. Issues of Leadership and Administration such as planning and resource allocation, organizational change and culture, and the value of a shared vision for all stakeholders are addressed in the third volume. From practical matters like staffing and volunteers, to big-picture issues such as alternative visions for the future of the field, this volume offers vital knowledge and insight. The final volume, on Inquiry and Influences, examines the context, trends, and methods of research and evaluation in the field’s many domains. Wide-ranging inquiry has always been a hallmark of ACE, and only continues to grow along with the recognition of the importance of adult learning for learners and for the society as a whole. All four volumes are available as a single e-book, to make the most of the inter-relatedness of the various topics. This version uses live links in the table of contents and combined index (as well as keywords at the start of each article) to enable readers to follow their own topical interests and thus create unique learning pathways for themselves.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 536 6 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 537 3 / $28.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 539 7 / $22.99
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Mapping the Field of Adult and Continuing Education
An International Compendium
Foreword by Steven B. Frye
Co-published with The field of Adult and Continuing Education (ACE) has long been influential beyond its already porous borders and continues to be a source of important ideas, inspiration, and innovative practices for those in disciplines such as educational administration, social work, nursing, and counseling. Recognizing this, the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education commissioned the editors to create this compendium, which provides an invaluable resource to readers already established in the field, those entering the field, and to myriad neighbors of the field as well. This four-volume compendium (also available as a combined e-book) brings together a host of national and international contributors to map the field of ACE in a series of brief articles addressing key theories and practices across its many domains and settings. These are arranged in four volumes, available either individually or as a set: Volume One: Adult Learners Volume Two: Teaching and Learning Volume Three: Leadership and Administration Volume Four: Inquiry and Influences The volume on Adult Learners will include articles addressing topics such as adult development, diversity, learning abilities, the influence of personality on learning, and the role of experience in adult learning. By far the largest segment of learners in society, and currently the largest segment of college students as well, a better understanding of the adult learner is vital for educators of all kinds. Volume two addresses Teaching and Learning topics ranging from methods and roles to programs and materials. Encompassing formal and informal learning, as well as the variety of focus and setting, from cultural to occupational, this volume explores the wide range of theory and practice in ACE. Issues of Leadership and Administration such as planning and resource allocation, organizational change and culture, and the value of a shared vision for all stakeholders are addressed in the third volume. From practical matters like staffing and volunteers, to big-picture issues such as alternative visions for the future of the field, this volume offers vital knowledge and insight. The final volume, on Inquiry and Influences, examines the context, trends, and methods of research and evaluation in the field’s many domains. Wide-ranging inquiry has always been a hallmark of ACE, and only continues to grow along with the recognition of the importance of adult learning for learners and for the society as a whole. All four volumes are available as a single e-book, to make the most of the inter-relatedness of the various topics. This version uses live links in the table of contents and combined index (as well as keywords at the start of each article) to enable readers to follow their own topical interests and thus create unique learning pathways for themselves.

Paper: 978 1 62036 540 3 / $100.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 542 7 / $80.00
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Meaningful and Manageable Program Assessment
A How-To Guide for Higher Education Faculty
In this book, the authors provide readers with a straightforward approach to doing assessment in a way that is meaningful, manageable, and sustainable over time. Including a straightforward overview of assessment concepts and principles and practical, easy-to-follow instructions for multiple assessment tools and key steps in the assessment process, this book is a handy, all-in-one how-to guide. In addition, the text guides readers toward the development of a culture of assessment. Writing in a conversational tone that has helped the authors to successfully teach assessment principles and practices to faculty and administrators from a variety of academic disciplines and institutions, the book reads as if a friendly, supportive assessment professional is by your side. The book begins with an overview of the assessment process and key assessment concepts and principles. Subsequent modules provide detailed instructions and specific tips for carrying out each step of the process, including three modules focused on creating and implementing specific assessment measurement tools. The authors recommend readers begin by reading Module 1, which provides a framework that will enhance understanding of each of the steps of the process that are spelled out in detail in subsequent modules. However, after that, each of the modules is designed to stand alone. Readers need not read the modules in order nor do they need to read all of them in order to benefit from the authors’ guidance. In addition, the authors have created a video to accompany Module 10 in which they take readers step-by-step through the use of Excel spreadsheets to organize and present assessment data.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 563 2 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 564 9 / $29.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 566 3 / $23.99
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The Missing Professor
An Academic Mystery / Informal Case Studies / Discussion Stories for Faculty Development, New Faculty Orientation and Campus Conversations
Fresh out of graduate school and desperate to pay off her student loans, Nicole Adams joins the faculty at Higher State U, a small university with a dubious past located in the middle of the Midwest. On her second day of classes as a new assistant professor of philosophy, still flustered and disoriented, Nicole is plunged into a campus-wide mystery. Someone has ransacked the office she shares with the ill-tempered R. Reynolds Raskin, the department's senior professor, and he has since disappeared. Two weeks later, with Raskin still missing, Nicole receives a threatening phone call . . . Read one way, this is an entertaining parody of an academic mystery and a humorous take on academic life. Turning the book upside down reveals another purpose. Each chapter is constructed as an informal case study/discussion story, as is made manifest by a series of discussion questions intended for faculty development, new faculty orientation, and conversations among faculty, administrators, and academic staff. As the mystery unfolds, each chapter finds Nicole encountering challenging situations—such as, the first day of class, student incivility, teaching evaluations, peer observation, academic assessment, the scholarship of teaching and learning, faculty and student rights and responsibilities, core curricula, and tenure standards. This little book can be read and used both ways: as pure entertainment and as a series of informal case studies, spiced with humor, to help break down academic barriers and promote spirited discussions

Cloth: 978 1 57922 137 9 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 138 6 / $23.95
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The Multicampus System
Perspectives on Practice, and Prospects
Edited by Gerald Gaither
Introduction by Eugene C. Lee, Frank Bowen
During the last half-century, multicampus systems have become the dominant model of public higher education in the United States. Approximately 80% of the students currently enrolled in two- and four-year public colleges and universities attend institutions that are part of a multicampus system. Because of their dominance and public funding most receive, these systems, their Presidents and Chancellors are being subjected to intense and unprecedented scrutiny and to pressures for accountability and productivity. The distinguished contributors--nationally prominent leaders of four- and two-year multicampus institutions--consider such issues as: How can the leaders and managers of multicampus systems cope with the new operational challenges that confront them? How should, or have, leaders responded to dwindling or unpredictable resources; to new public expectations or formal mandates for accountability and productivity? What should their organizations’ missions be? How can they build on organizational strengths and take advantage of opportunities while minimizing organizational weaknesses and overcoming threats to their existence? How can they formulate desirable strategies and implement them effectively? This is the first comprehensive examination of multicampus systems that has been conducted since Eugene Lee’s and Frank Bowen’s work in the early 1970’s.The environment within which these institutions operate has since undergone seismic economic, demographic, political and technological shifts. This book fills an urgent need to provide university and community college leaders, trustees and policy makers with guidance and information for developing effective policies in an increasingly complex and uncertain world.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 016 7 / $75.00
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New Yardsticks to Measure Financial Distress
Offers suggestions for new criteria and yardsticks to gauge a college's financial condition, and identifies means to equitably balance employment security for faculty with programmatic flexibility for institutions.

Paper: 978 1 56377 087 6 / $15.95
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The Nigger in You
Challenging Dysfunctional Language, Engaging Leadership Moments
Embrace Leadership to Combat All Forms of Prejudice Is there a “nigger” in you? If you have attempted to avoid and/or escape oppression, been made to feel as if you are a problem, been treated as “lesser than” or even like a criminal, all just because you are different in a given context, then what Dr. J. W. Wiley asserts through the title of this book inescapably applies to you. Through any of our multiple identities—stereotyped, marginalized, or ostracized by our socio-economic class, level of education, gender, disability, age, race, sexual orientation, or religion—we are all potential victims as well as perpetrators of denigrating language and discrimination. Dr. Wiley borrows the agency of nigger, arguably the quintessential, most universally known term of disparagement of those negatively considered the Other, to re-frame the word as no longer just a racial term but one that symbolizes many of the ways we disrespect or bully one another, are inconsiderate of one another, prejudge one another, and internalize our demonization. He defines the word in a way that demonstrates its equivalence to other dysfunctional language (retard, bitch, fag, trailer trash, etc.) that suggests that those so targeted are unworthy of consideration in our society. By creating a conversation around such language, Dr. Wiley challenges us to recognize that, when we give in to our prejudices and stereotypes, the “nigger in you” is what we are apt to see when we encounter those different from ourselves. The author, who is Director of the Center for Diversity, Pluralism, and Inclusion for the State University of New York–Plattsburg, a Lecturer in Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies, and president of his own consulting business, engages diversity in a uniquely inclusive way and as inseparable from social justice. By dissecting the offensive language we often use, consciously or unconsciously, Dr. Wiley provokes us to recognize that, since every one of us has multiple identities beyond just the color of our skin, it is virtually impossible for most of us not to have felt the sting of oppression, or the power of privilege that some of those same multiple identities may confer on us. Consequently, it is morally incumbent on us to contest and ultimately transcend oppression wherever we encounter it, to respect the humanity of those different from us, and become allies in the war to protect and advance people’s right to be different. Through personal stories, scholarship, poetry, commentary on current affairs, lyrics, and his experiences as a Black man both rooted in African American culture and the culture of the academy who daily has to navigate and negotiate multiple worlds, Dr. Wiley leads us on a journey toward social justice. In doing so, he empowers us—in whatever sphere, private or public, in which we have some agency—to embrace our leadership moments by engaging those who would perpetrate dysfunctional language or behavior, and help create a world in which differences are respected and validated.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 985 6 / $125.00
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Off the Tenure Track
Six Models for Full-Time, Nontenurable Appointments
Edited by Judith M Gappa
Explores nontraditional, full-time faculty appointments that are being used as alternatives to traditional tenure-track faculty careers, and the academic and other reasons underlying their increasing use.

Paper: 978 1 56377 093 7 / $16.95
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Outcomes-Based Program Review
Closing Achievement Gaps In and Outside the Classroom With Alignment to Predictive Analytics and Performance Metrics
Foreword by Ralph Wolff
Second Edition This book introduces the reader to the principles of assessment of student learning outcomes in the context of program review, and illustrates how to implement a sustainable outcomes-based assessment program review process based on over 30 case studies of exemplary practice across a range of institutional types. Since publication of the first edition just over a decade ago, the landscape of higher education has been transformed. With the emergence of competency-based education, the questioning of the value of a post-secondary degree, the explosion of neuroscientific research, the emphasis on metacognition, as well as demographic changes in who is going to college and why, new questions are being asked and new methods of collecting data have multiplied. This new edition retains the goals of the first--which is to inform institutional self-reflection of how well the organization is achieving its intended purpose--in a manner that is reflective, adaptive, and collaborative, but which recognizes today’s changed environment. Among the new topics Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik introduces in this edition is how to appropriately connect outcomes-based program review (OBPR) to performance indicators and predictive analytics and develop meaningful new performance metrics to inform our understanding of the student experience. She also addresses the intersection of OBPR with competency-based assessment, introduces the reader to new concepts and terminology, and demonstrates the implications of neuroscientific research for learning and development and how that influences OBPR design. All the cases, a signature feature of the first edition to illustrate best practice, have been replaced for this edition. Bresciani Ludvik postulates the importance of developing institutions as learning organizations where OBPR is designed collaboratively between student services, academic services, business services professionals, and faculty. Each chapter concludes with key learning points as well as questions for organizational leadership to promote ongoing professional development as institutions implement OBPR practices that are appropriate for their specific contexts.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 229 7 / $95.00
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Overcoming Educational Racism in the Community College
Creating Pathways to Success for Minority and Impoverished Student Populations
Edited by Angela Long
Foreword by Walter G. Bumphus
Overall, nearly half of all incoming community college students “drop-out” within twelve months of enrolling, with students of color and the economically disadvantaged faring far worse. Given the high proportion of underserved students these colleges enroll, the detrimental impact on their communities, and for the national economy as a whole at a time of diversifying demographics, is enormous. This book addresses this urgent issue by bringing together nationally recognized researchers whose work throws light on the structural and systemic causes of student attrition, as well as college presidents and leaders who have successfully implemented strategies to improve student outcomes. The book is divided into five sections, each devoted to a demographic group: African Americans, Native Americans/American Indians, Latino Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Caucasian students in poverty. Each section in turn comprises three chapters, the first providing an up-to-date summary of research findings about barriers and attainments pertaining to the corresponding population, the second the views of a community college president, and the final chapter offering a range of models and best practices for achieving student success. The analyses--descriptions of cutting edge programs--and recommendations for action will commend this volume to everyone concerned about equity and completion rates in the community college sector, from presidents and senior administrators through faculty and student affairs leaders. For educational researchers, it fills blanks on data about attrition and persistence patterns of minority students attending community colleges. Contributors Kenneth Atwater Glennda M. Bivens Edward Bush Cara Crowley Maria Harper-Marinick Joan B. Holmes G. Edward Hughes Lee Lambert Cynthia Lindquist, Ta’Sunka Wicahpi Win (Star Horse Woman) Angela Long Russell Lowery-Hart Jamillah Moore Christopher M. Mullin Brian Murphy Eduardo J. Padrón Deborah A. Santiago Wei Song Robert Teranishi Rowena M. Tomaneng James Utterback J. Luke Wood

Cloth: 978 1 62036 347 8 / $125.00
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Pathways to Higher Education Administration for African American Women
For Black women faculty members and student affairs personnel, this book delineates the needed skills and the range of possible pathways for attaining administrative positions in higher education. This book uses a survey that identifies the skills and knowledge that Black women administrators report as most critical at different stages of their careers as a foundation for the personal narratives of individual administrators’ career progressions. The contributors address barriers, strategies, and considerations such as the comparative merits of starting a career at an HBCU or PWI, or at a public or private institution. Their stories shine light on how to develop the most effective leadership style, how to communicate, and the importance of leading with credibility. They dwell on the necessity of listening to one’s inner voice in guiding decisions, of maintaining integrity and having a clear sense of values, and of developing a realistic sense of personal limitations and abilities. They illustrate how to combine institutional and personal priorities with service to the community; share how the authors carved out their distinct and purposeful career paths; and demonstrate the importance of the mentoring they received and provided along the way. A theoretical chapter provides a frame for reflecting on the paths traveled. These accounts and reflections provide enlightenment, inspiration, and nuggets of wisdom for all Black women who want to advance their careers in higher education.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 249 9 / $125.00
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Place-Based Community Engagement in Higher Education
A Strategy to Transform Universities and Communities
Foreword by Geoffrey Canada
While an increasing number of universities have or are committed to engaging their campuses in their surrounding communities, many recognize they lack the strategic focus and resources to maximize and sustain their impact on those communities. Place-based community engagement provides a powerful way to creatively connect campus and community to foster positive social transformation. In developing community engagement strategies, most universities and community organizations face significant challenges in deciding who to partner with and why. Frequently this leads universities and community organizations to say “yes” to too many opportunities which significantly limit their ability to pursue long-term impact. Focusing on an established geographic area can make it much easier to decide where to deploy resources and which partnerships to prioritize and thus increase their ability to form strong and sustainable partnerships that are of greater value to all stakeholders. This book presents the emerging model of place-based community engagement as a powerful process for attaining more positive and enduring results in their local communities as well as stimulating wider engagement by campus constituencies. Drawing upon the concept of collective impact and using data-driven decision making, place-based initiatives build long-term partnerships based upon a shared vision. Done thoughtfully, these place-based initiatives have attained impressive results. Drawing upon the case studies of five institutions that have implemented place-based community engagement initiatives, the authors provide guidance on the opportunities, challenges, and considerations involved in putting a place-based approach into effect. By sharing the experiences of these five institutions, they describe in detail the routes each took to turn their place-based initiatives from concept to reality, and the results they achieved.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 676 9 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 677 6 / $35.00
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The Power of Integrated Learning
Higher Education for Success in Life, Work, and Society
Students and their parents wonder if college is worth the investment. Employers want graduates with the skills they need. The public wonders if higher education is preparing future generations for an era of dynamic change. In his latest book, William Sullivan offers a model of higher education that answers all these questions in the affirmative, through the power of integrated learning. Drawing on examples from the 25 members of the New American Colleges & Universities (NAC&U) consortium, the book makes the case for an approach that combines the strengths of the liberal arts, professional studies, and civic responsibility in order to give students the combination of skills and experience that will prepare them for success in all aspects of life after graduation. NAC&U campuses place emphasis upon enabling their students to know themselves and their abilities, as well as providing them with opportunities to develop a sophisticated understanding of the world. To achieve these goals, the academic programs focus on developing students’ intellectual and practical skills, such as analytical ability, problem solving, facility in written and spoken communication, and an appreciation for human diversity and creativity. These have traditionally been identified as the goals of a liberal arts education, and are the same ones identified in a national employer survey as giving job-seekers an edge. These institutions also invest a great deal of effort to provide their students with state-of-the-art preparation for professional life and occupational success in diverse fields. These range from the technical – science and technology fields, with disciplines such as engineering and computer science – through business, and across the human service fields, such as education, nursing, pre-medicine, and pre-law, to architecture, and the performing and visual arts. In these courses of study, students begin to shape their future careers. The important third value of a NAC&U education is fostering civic responsibility among students. In programs of study abroad and a range of internship and service opportunities, these colleges support their students in shaping for themselves unique and effective ways to contribute to the larger life of their world. Parents and prospective students may appreciate the chance to learn more about these schools and what they have to offer, while those working in higher education will appreciate the chance to learn more about a model that their own institutions may be motivated to emulate. All readers will take away a picture of a truly vital part of the higher education landscape in this country.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 407 9 / $125.00
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Practical Wisdom
Thinking Differently About College and University Governance
Foreword by Richard Chait
This series of essays written for trustees and administrative leaders of universities and colleges draws on the authors’ extensive consulting experience, research into the dynamics of boards, and service as trustees, to focus on practical insights that will help readers improve governance. The authors have contributed a series of essays on governing well to Inside Higher Education, which formed the inspiration for this volume. The primary aim of the book is to provide insight that boards can use to enhance their governing practices. The author’s take is not a “how to do” book but rather one on “how to think.” Their basic premise is that too many boards are underperforming because they adopt or continue ineffective practices. However, thinking in more intentional if not new ways about not only what they do as boards, but how they go about their efforts, will help boards add value to the institutions and state systems they govern. The authors use thought provoking-titles and a conversational tone to engage the readers, get them to reflect on their work, and broaden their horizons.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 838 1 / $95.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 839 8 / $32.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 841 1 / $25.99
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Preparing Your Campus for Veterans' Success
An Integrated Approach to Facilitating The Transition and Persistence of Our Military Students
Contributions by Holly Wheeler Ph.D.
This book is intended for everyone in higher education – whether in the classroom, student affairs, administration, admissions, health services or faculty development – who is, or expects to be teaching, advising, or serving student veterans. This book is the outcome of a partnership between the Center for Teaching and Learning and the office of Disabilities Services at the University of South Dakota that led to the development of the Fides program whose goal was to establish high-quality, evidence-based development opportunities specifically designed to enable key university constituencies—the faculty, staff, and administration—to understand their role in providing extraordinary learning experiences for veterans. The program was funded through a congressionally directed FIPSE grant. Materials from Fides have been featured by prominent educational organizations, and are being used by the National Center for PTSD, colleges, universities, and boards of regents across the US. This book provides the background and guidelines you need to leverage the strengths that student veterans bring to your institution, to ease the challenges they face in transitioning into higher education, to facilitate their learning, and to ensure their successful graduation. Student veterans bring many strengths to your campus – maturity, significant life experiences, and cross-cultural awareness. They are highly motivated to serve others and value education. Student veterans may however face significant challenges. Student veterans have typically been out of high school for some time, where they may have earned average grades. Many are married with children and more than a few are single parents. They are approximately 20% less likely than non-veterans to attain a bachelor degree and slightly more likely to drop out of higher education without attaining a degree of any sort. Deployments extend their time to degree, and multiple deployments can significantly delay graduation. The challenges associated with transitioning from the military into higher education are heightened when a student has a disability – physical, psychological, or emotional. Common disabilities that are emerging from Iraq and Afghanistan include amputations, hearing loss, traumatic brain injury, and post-traumatic stress disorder. To enable student veterans to succeed, institutions need to develop holistic initiatives to mediate student veterans’ transition and persistence, and develop appropriate programs and services that recognize their skills, family responsibilities, and distinct needs. This book outlines best practices for student affairs; describes innovative approaches to administrative services and support; suggests streamlining policies and procedures to make the campus “veteran friendly”; proposes ideas for academic programs; looks at the implications for course structure and design; considers the classroom environment; and explores how classroom policies impact student veterans. One chapter examines the issue of student veteran success specifically from the point of view of two-year institutions. The authors stress the importance of collaborative approaches across divisions and functions providing all stakeholders on campus with a comprehensive view of how they can support each to ensure the success of their student veterans.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 862 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 863 7 / $31.95
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Provost
Experiences, Reflections and Advice From a Former "Number Two" on Campus
Foreword by D.H. DeHayes
What is a Provost—and what does a Provost do? Don’t look for the answers on the bookshelf. There is scant literature devoted to the Provost-ship – for which the author advances a number of hypotheses – so, until this informal and autobiographical account, there has been little for aspirants or new appointees to draw on for guidance or to provide a feel for what the role entails. Larry Nielsen offers a highly personal account of his tenure as Provost of North Carolina State University, from his unexpected invitation by the Chancellor to act as interim Provost, to the events that forced his resignation four years later, and brought him unwanted notoriety. In a fast-paced, self-deprecating style he invites the reader to share the activities that crowded his schedule, the symbolic character of the role, its opportunities to shape policy, and its limitations, as well as the joy and satisfaction he derived from making a difference in people’s lives and the institution. We see him in action, and get a sense of the role, as he addresses problems large and small. He shares insights on the governance of a large public institution, on how monies are allocated, and funds made available for strategic initiatives. By the end of the book, we gain an understanding of the myriad roles of the “number two” position of the institution, responsible for the direction and functioning of all its academic and curricular affairs, that Larry Nielsen characterized for himself as “the University's stay-at-home Dad.” He concludes the book with a look back at the Provost’s job from his renewed perspective as a faculty member, further demonstrating the truth of his assertion that “where you stand depends on where you sit.” This is an entertaining and insightful read for anyone who wants to get a glimpse of how a large university functions, as seen through the eyes of an ultimate “insider.” For those interested in taking on the highest administrative positions in higher education it offers a window into that world, including the perils to which incumbents can be exposed when their actions become front-page news.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 969 6 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 972 6 / $29.99
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Publicly Engaged Scholars
Next-Generation Engagement and the Future of Higher Education
Foreword by Timothy K. Eatman
Afterword by Peter Levine
The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university. This book presents the voices of a new generation of scholars, educators, and practitioners who are committed to civic renewal and the public purposes of higher education. They question existing policies, structures, and practices, and put forward new forms of engagement that can help to shape and transform higher education to align it with societal needs. The scholars featured in this book make the case for public scholarship and argue that, in order to strengthen the democratic purposes of higher education for a viable future that is relevant to the needs of a changing society, we must recognize and support new models of teaching and research, and the need for fundamental changes in the core practices, policies, and cultures of the academy. These scholars act on their values through collaboration, inclusiveness, participation, task sharing, and reciprocity in public problem solving. Central to their approach is an authentic respect for the expertise and experience that all stakeholders contribute to education, knowledge generation, and community building. This book offers a vision of the university as a part of an ecosystem of knowledge production, addressing public problems with the purpose of advancing a more inclusive, deliberative democracy; and explores the new paradigm for teaching, learning, and knowledge creation necessary to make it a reality.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 263 1 / $125.00
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Rethinking Leadership in a Complex, Multicultural, and Global Environment
New Concepts and Models for Higher Education
Edited by Adrianna Kezar
The complexity of the decisions that today’s higher education leaders face—as they engage with a diversifying student body, globalization and technological advances—requires embracing new ways of thinking about leadership. This book examines the new theories and concepts of leadership that are described in the multidisciplinary literature on leadership, and are being applied in other sectors—from government to the non-profit and business communities—to explore the implications for leaders and leadership programs in higher education. At a time when the heroic, controlling, and distant leader of the past has given way to a focus on teams, collectives and social change, the contributors to this book ask: What new skills and competencies should leaders and programs be addressing? The recognition of the interdependence of groups within organizations, and between organizations; of cultural and social differences; and of how technology has sped up decision time and connected people across the globe; have changed the nature of leadership as well as made the process more complex and diffuse. This book is addressed to anyone developing institutional, regional or national leadership development programs; to aspiring leaders planning to participate in such programs; and to campus leaders concerned with the development and pipeline of emerging leaders. It will be particularly useful for administrators in faculty development offices who are planning and creating workshops in leadership training, and for staff in human resource offices who offer similar training. Contributors: Laurel Beesemyer; Rozana Carducci; Pamela Eddy; Tricia Bertram Gallant; Lynn Gangone; Cheryl Getz; Jeni Hart; Jerlando F. L. Jackson; Lara Jaime; Adrianna Kezar; Bridget R. McCurtis; Sharon McDade; Robert J. Nash; Elizabeth M. O’Callahan; Sue V. Rosser; Lara Scott.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 281 9 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 282 6 / $33.50
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Roadmap to Resources
Sources and Tools for CQI Implementation
A sourcebook listing nearly 300 published and unpublished campus CQI resources; 200+ recommended books and articles; plus quality-related associations, conferences, journals and newsletters, online resources, audiocassettes, software, videos, and more.

Paper: 978 1 56377 098 2 / $24.95
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The Search Committee Handbook
A Guide to Recruiting Administrators
* Reviews of the first edition: "Finally, higher education has an intelligent guide for recruiting administrators--an activity often taken for granted and not always thoughtfully carried out." -- Paul A. Elsner, Maricopa Community College District "The book we've needed ... the Turabian of search." -- James M. Heffernan, State University of New York This >Handbook focuses on administrative searches below the level of the presidency--the searches for vice-presidents, deans, directors, and coordinators for which the appointment of a search committee is the norm. It is written for practitioners--for the institutional leaders who will plan the search, form the committee, and later make the appointment; as well as for the chair and members of the search committee itself. It is intended as a guide and a fund of ideas to promote better, more informed and more effective practice. The second edition of this acclaimed book reflects the extensive changes that have taken place in the hiring climate. Video-conferencing allows travel-free interviewing. The Web permits desktop research and has given rise to the online posting of openings. Federal and state regulations about hiring and employment have grown apace. The use of search firms has expanded from the presidency to other administrative posts. The shift in student demographics is increasing the need for faculty-staff diversity. Perhaps the most significant change is the recent sharp decline in the size of applicant pools for administrative posts. All these factors add up to a different–and more challenging–set of tasks for campus leadership and search committees. To unpack these issues the Atlantic Philanthropies provided a grant to AAHE and the Academic Search Consultation Service to fund a national advisory board, undertake extensive literature reviews, and conduct focus groups and numerous interviews with committee chairs and others. The new edition of this classic and authoritative source of advice for finding, selecting, and appointing the best people to key administrative positions is informed by this extensive research.

Paper: 978 1 57922 177 5 / $24.95
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Search Committees
A Comprehensive Guide to Successful Faculty, Staff, and Administrative Searches
Foreword by Edna Chun
Finding the right candidate for administrative, professional and faculty positions is one of the most important tasks that any institution or enterprise undertakes. However, few higher education professionals receive training on the search committee process, but are expected to serve on or lead committees. This book provides advice, training, and a step-by-step guide for conducting a rigorous, thorough search. Following the expert model presented in this book will virtually guarantee successful searches. This guide furthermore provides advanced diversity selection techniques that are not commonly found in many resources inside or outside of higher education, and that have become institutional priorities in the context of demographic changes and globalization that require that higher education serve more diverse populations and compete internationally. This guide covers the complete cycle of hiring, starting with defining the position and forming and briefing the committee, through cultivating a rich and diverse pool of candidates and screening and evaluating candidates, to making the selection, successfully completing the search successfully, and welcoming colleagues to campus. This volume includes over 30 templates that are designed to be copied and used as training handouts or as handy reference and resource materials that provide guidance at various stages of the search process. The over two dozen vignettes included can be used as training case studies or as expert advice that illuminates key concepts that are helpful with improving the quality of the search process. The guide includes: 1. An expert step-by-step search model. 2. Dozens of templates, samples, tools, plus a bank of interview questions. 3. Diversity recruitment and selection protocols and techniques. 4. Resource guide with advice, case studies, examples, and training materials. Coverage includes: * How to Build a Successful Search * Recruiting Guide * How to Design a Diverse Selection Process * Minority Recruiting Resources * Interview Guide * A Bank of Interview Questions * Screening Methods * Sample Forms, Templates, Checklists * Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues This guide serves the needs of administrators who shape hiring policy and goals, committee chairs and members. It is also a resource that human resources professionals can use to train, equip and support search committees. A complementary website at www.SearchCommittees.com offers additional resources. [Previous edition published by CUPA-HR: Search Committees: A Tool Kit By Christopher D. Lee, Ph.D., 2000]

Cloth: 978 1 62036 199 3 / $125.00
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Seasons of a Dean's Life
Understanding the Role and Building Leadership Capacity
What are the demands of being a dean? What leadership development do deans need as they progress through their academic careers? How are their responsibilities changing? What are institutions looking for in applicants? This book identifies the range of leadership skills required, and illuminates the process of building leadership capacity, by drawing on interviews with over 50 sitting deans, both women and men; on the insights derived from conducting professional development seminars for several hundred deans; and on the authors’ 48 years of collective experience in eight different deanships. The abundant examples and accounts of individual deans’ leadership successes and failures, and the competences they developed along their career paths, give the reader a taste of what the deanship is really like—and how the role changes over time. In the process of gathering their data, and tracing their own and others’, administrative journeys, the authors found similarities in how deans progress as leaders, in the common rites of passage they encounter, and in the evolution of their role. They describe the stages or “seasons” of the deanship, ranging from getting started – the first three years of deanship (springtime), to hitting your stride – years four to seven of deanship (summer), and keeping the fire alive – eight years and beyond of deanship (fall), through to planning to step down and leaving the role (winter). What also emerged from the authors’ research is that most deans come to their positions without leadership training, without prior executive experience, without a clear understanding of the ambiguity of their new role, or its responsibilities. This book fills a void by offering guidance on applying for a deanship, preparing for the role, and purposefully building the needed skills and knowledge. For anyone considering taking on a deanship, this book offers a unique window into the role. For sitting deans, it offers a compass for shaping the trajectory of their careers.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 318 2 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 319 9 / $27.50
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 729 6 / $21.99
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Senior Faculty Considering Retirement
A Developmental & Policy Issue
Examines what influences senior faculty in making decisions about the timing of retirement. Focuses on the interaction between individual development and planning and institutional policies and planning.

Paper: 978 1 56377 094 4 / $15.95
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The Senior International Officer as Change Agent
Published by AIEA. Distributed by Stylus. This new edition reflects the dramatic changes that have taken place across the world in higher education in the decade since the first was published, and addresses how they specifically impact international education and inform the role of senior international officer (SIO) today. Declining public investment in higher education and a negative political climate have increasingly led to the commercialization of international education activities and the expectation they should pay for themselves by levying fees or seeking outside funding. In addition, today’s international education leadership faces several contradictory realities. While inexorable trends in globalization continue to stimulate higher levels of participation in international study and exchange, its impacts – such as increased migration, global terrorism and the populist resistance they have provoked – are shifting institutional priorities from those of greater openness and global understanding to those of profitability and security. Facing these issues and the global competition for student talent at a time of declining enrollments; the impacts of technology; the increasing diversity on campus; pressures to partner across borders; changing emphases in institutional mission; and the expectations of both parents and students in gaining a global perspective during university studies, it’s clear that the key issue facing SIOs is managing change as colleges and universities seek to strengthen, professionalize, and centralize - or in some cases decentralize – their international offices. This book provides SIOs with the context to navigate and shape the International Office to meet the needs of their institutions in the years ahead.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 958 6 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 959 3 / $24.95
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 961 6 / $19.99
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Teachers As Mentors
Models for Promoting Achievement with Disadvantaged and Underrepresented Students by Creating Community
Foreword by Deborah W. Meier
The book describes two similar and successful models of youth mentoring used by two acclaimed urban high schools that have consistently achieved exceptional graduation rates. Providing a detailed description of their methods – based upon extensive observation, and interviews with teachers, students, administrators, and parents – this book makes a major contribution to the debate on how to reduce the achievement gap. Using similar teacher-as-youth mentor and youth advising models, these two inner city schools – Fenway High School in Boston, Massachusetts; and the Kedma School in Jerusalem – have broken the cycle of failure for the student populations they serve—children from underrepresented groups living in poverty in troubled neighborhoods with few resources. Students in both schools have excelled academically, rarely dropout, and progress to college in significant numbers (Fenway has 90% graduation rate, with 95% of graduates going on to college. Kedma outperforms comparable urban schools by a factor of four). Both schools have won numerous awards, with Fenway High School gaining Pilot School status in Massachusetts, a recognition the state only awards to a few exemplary schools; and Kedma School being declared one of the 50 most influential educational endeavors in Israel. The success of both schools is directly attributable to their highly developed teacher-as-a-youth mentor programs that embody an ideology and mission that put students at the center of their programs and structures. The models are closely integrated with the curriculum, and support the social, emotional, cultural, and academic needs of students, as well as develop close mentor-student-parent relationships. The model furthermore includes extensive support for the mentors themselves. Apart from the potential of these models to narrow the achievement gap, these two schools have a record of creating a school climate that promotes safety, and reduces the incidence of bullying and violence. At the heart of both programs is creating community—between departments and functions in the school; and between teachers, staff, students, and parents. Everyone in the school system should read this book. Research suggests that caring relationships between students and teachers significantly enhance Social Emotional Learning (SEL) -- defined as the process through which children develop their ability to integrate thinking, feeling, and behaving to achieve important life tasks -- which is recognized as an important factor in children's success in school. However, caring schools are usually the exception, especially at the secondary level where relationships between students and teachers seem to deteriorate significantly. This book provides a schoolwide model for establishing caring secondary schools and enhancing SEL using a teacher-as-a youth mentor model.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 310 6 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 311 3 / $31.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 608 4 / $25.99
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Transformative Civic Engagement Through Community Organizing
Foreword by Scott J. Peters
Afterword by Michael Gecan
Maria Avila presents a personal account of her experience as a teenager working in a factory in Ciudad Juarez to how she got involved in community organizing. She has since applied the its distinctive practices of community organizing to civic engagement in higher education, demonstrating how this can help create a culture that values and rewards civically engaged scholarship and advance higher education’s public, democratic mission. Adapting what she learned during her years as an organizer with the Industrial Areas Foundation, she describes a practice that aims for full reciprocity between partners and is achieved through the careful nurturing of relationships, a mutual understanding of personal narratives, leadership building, power analysis, and critical reflection. She demonstrates how she implemented the process in various institutions and in various contexts and shares lessons learned. Community organizing recognizes the need to understand the world as it is in order to create spaces where stakeholders can dialogue and deliberate about strategies for creating the world as we would like it to be. Maria Avila offers a vision and process that can lead to creating institutional change in higher education, in communities surrounding colleges and universities, and in society at large. This book is a narrative of her personal and professional journey and of how she has gone about co-creating spaces where democracy can be enacted and individual, institutional, and community transformation can occur. In inviting us to experience the process of organizing, and in keeping with its values and spirit, she includes the voices of the participants in the initiatives in which she collaborated – stakeholders ranging from community partners to faculty, students, and administrators in higher education.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 103 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 104 7 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 106 1 / $27.99
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Transparent Design in Higher Education Teaching and Leadership
A Guide to Implementing the Transparency Framework Institution-Wide to Improve Learning and Retention
This book offers a comprehensive guide to the Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT) framework that has convincingly demonstrated, since its initial development over a decade ago, that implementation increases retention and improved outcomes for all students, most particularly underrepresented students. Its effectiveness has spurred the increasing use of transparent instruction across the U.S. and internationally. Its premise is simple: to make learning processes explicit and equitably accessible for all students. Transparent instruction involves faculty/student discussion about several important aspects of academic work before students undertake that work, making explicit the purpose of the work, the knowledge that will be gained and its utility in students’ lives beyond college; explaining the tasks involved, the expected criteria, and providing multiple examples of of real-world work application of the specific academic discipline. The simple change of making objective and methods explicit – that faculty recognize as consistent with their teaching goals – creates substantial benefits for students and demonstrably increases such predictors of college students’ success as academic confidence, sense of belonging in college, self-awareness of skill development, and persistence. This guide presents a brief history of TILT, summarizes both past and current research on its impact on learning, and describes the three-part Transparency Framework (of purposes, tasks and criteria). The three sections of the book in turn demonstrate why and how transparent instruction works, and suggest strategies for instructors who wish to adopt it; describe how educational developers and teaching centers have adopted the Framework and integrated it into their programming, including infusing it in SoTL, and guiding curricular revision; and conclude with examples of how several institutions have used the Framework to connect the daily work of faculty with the learning goals that departments, programs and institutions aim to demonstrate.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 822 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 823 7 / $35.00
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 825 1 / $27.99
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Understanding College and University Organization
Theories for Effective Policy and Practice
Foreword by D. Bruce Johnstone
Now available in paperback, this two-volume work is intended to help readers develop powerful new ways of thinking about organizational principles, and apply them to policy-making and management in colleges and universities. The book is written with two audiences in mind: administrative and faculty leaders in institutions of higher learning, and students (both doctoral and Master's degree) studying to become upper-level administrators, leaders, and policy makers in higher education. It systematically presents a range of theories that can be applied to many of the difficult management situations that college and university leaders encounter. It provides them with the theoretical background to knowledgeably evaluate the many new ideas that emerge in the current literature, and in workshops and conferences. The purpose is to help leaders develop their own effective management style and approaches, and feel confident that their actions are informed by appropriate theory and knowledge of the latest research in the field. Without theory, organizational leaders are forced to treat each problem that they encounter as unique–as if it were a first-time occurrence. While leaders may have some experience with a particular issue, their solutions are usually not informed by the accumulated wisdom of others who have already encountered and resolved similar situations. The authors approach the theory of the organization and administration of colleges and universities from three quite different perspectives, or paradigms, each relying on different assumptions about the “reality” of organizational life in colleges and universities. The positivist paradigm–primarily an omnibus systems theory–integrates the chapters into a comprehensive, yet easily accessible whole. Social constructionism, the second paradigm, is introduced in each chapter to illuminate the difficulty of seeking and finding meaningful consensus on problems and policies, while also addressing important ethical issues that tend to be overlooked in leadership thought and action. The third paradigm, postmodernism, draws attention to difficulties of logic and communication under the constraints of strictly linear thinking that “authorities” at all levels attempt to impose on organizations. This “multiple paradigm” approach enables readers to become more cognizant of their own assumptions, how they may differ from those of others in their organization, and how those differences may both create difficulties in resolving problems and expand the range of alternatives considered in organizational decision making. The book offers readers the tools to balance the real-world needs to succeed in today’s challenging and competitive environment with the social and ethical aspirations of all its stakeholders and society at large. The authors’ aim is to elucidate how administration can be made more efficient and effective through rational decision-making while also respecting humanistic values. This approach highlights a range of phenomena that require attention if the institution is ultimately to be considered successful.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 132 4 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 769 2 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 774 6 / $31.99
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Understanding College and University Organization
Theories for Effective Policy and Practice
Foreword by D. Bruce Johnstone
Now available in paperback, this two-volume work is intended to help readers develop powerful new ways of thinking about organizational principles, and apply them to policy-making and management in colleges and universities. The book is written with two audiences in mind: administrative and faculty leaders in institutions of higher learning, and students (both doctoral and Master's degree) studying to become upper-level administrators, leaders, and policy makers in higher education. It systematically presents a range of theories that can be applied to many of the difficult management situations that college and university leaders encounter. It provides them with the theoretical background to knowledgeably evaluate the many new ideas that emerge in the current literature, and in workshops and conferences. The purpose is to help leaders develop their own effective management style and approaches, and feel confident that their actions are informed by appropriate theory and knowledge of the latest research in the field. Without theory, organizational leaders are forced to treat each problem that they encounter as unique–as if it were a first-time occurrence. While leaders may have some experience with a particular issue, their solutions are usually not informed by the accumulated wisdom of others who have already encountered and resolved similar situations. The authors approach the theory of the organization and administration of colleges and universities from three quite different perspectives, or paradigms, each relying on different assumptions about the “reality” of organizational life in colleges and universities. The positivist paradigm–primarily an omnibus systems theory–integrates the chapters into a comprehensive, yet easily accessible whole. Social constructionism, the second paradigm, is introduced in each chapter to illuminate the difficulty of seeking and finding meaningful consensus on problems and policies, while also addressing important ethical issues that tend to be overlooked in leadership thought and action. The third paradigm, postmodernism, draws attention to difficulties of logic and communication under the constraints of strictly linear thinking that “authorities” at all levels attempt to impose on organizations. This “multiple paradigm” approach enables readers to become more cognizant of their own assumptions, how they may differ from those of others in their organization, and how those differences may both create difficulties in resolving problems and expand the range of alternatives considered in organizational decision making. The book offers readers the tools to balance the real-world needs to succeed in today’s challenging and competitive environment with the social and ethical aspirations of all its stakeholders and society at large. The authors’ aim is to elucidate how administration can be made more efficient and effective through rational decision-making while also respecting humanistic values. This approach highlights a range of phenomena that require attention if the institution is ultimately to be considered successful.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 131 7 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 57922 768 5 / $39.95
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E-Book: 978 1 57922 773 9 / $31.99
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Understanding College and University Organization
Theories for Effective Policy and Practice
Foreword by D. Bruce Johnstone
Now available in paperback, this two-volume work is intended to help readers develop powerful new ways of thinking about organizational principles, and apply them to policy-making and management in colleges and universities. The book is written with two audiences in mind: administrative and faculty leaders in institutions of higher learning, and students (both doctoral and Master's degree) studying to become upper-level administrators, leaders, and policy makers in higher education. It systematically presents a range of theories that can be applied to many of the difficult management situations that college and university leaders encounter. It provides them with the theoretical background to knowledgeably evaluate the many new ideas that emerge in the current literature, and in workshops and conferences. The purpose is to help leaders develop their own effective management style and approaches, and feel confident that their actions are informed by appropriate theory and knowledge of the latest research in the field. Without theory, organizational leaders are forced to treat each problem that they encounter as unique–as if it were a first-time occurrence. While leaders may have some experience with a particular issue, their solutions are usually not informed by the accumulated wisdom of others who have already encountered and resolved similar situations. The authors approach the theory of the organization and administration of colleges and universities from three quite different perspectives, or paradigms, each relying on different assumptions about the “reality” of organizational life in colleges and universities. The positivist paradigm–primarily an omnibus systems theory–integrates the chapters into a comprehensive, yet easily accessible whole. Social constructionism, the second paradigm, is introduced in each chapter to illuminate the difficulty of seeking and finding meaningful consensus on problems and policies, while also addressing important ethical issues that tend to be overlooked in leadership thought and action. The third paradigm, postmodernism, draws attention to difficulties of logic and communication under the constraints of strictly linear thinking that “authorities” at all levels attempt to impose on organizations. This “multiple paradigm” approach enables readers to become more cognizant of their own assumptions, how they may differ from those of others in their organization, and how those differences may both create difficulties in resolving problems and expand the range of alternatives considered in organizational decision making. The book offers readers the tools to balance the real-world needs to succeed in today’s challenging and competitive environment with the social and ethical aspirations of all its stakeholders and society at large. The authors’ aim is to elucidate how administration can be made more efficient and effective through rational decision-making while also respecting humanistic values. This approach highlights a range of phenomena that require attention if the institution is ultimately to be considered successful.

Paper: 978 1 57922 770 8 / $70.00
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Using Focus Groups to Listen, Learn, and Lead in Higher Education
Foreword by Jillian Kinzie
Using Focus Groups to Listen, Learn, and Lead in Higher Education presents an easy-to-use 6-step guide to help leaders in higher education listen to and learn from their stakeholders in order to enhance decision making. The big questions facing institutions today, especially those surrounding access, affordability, and accountability, require more than dashboards. Metrics and quantitative data alone do not offer lasting solutions and improvements. Using qualitative methods to listen to the voices of those involved, especially students and staff, is critical. Focus groups constitute the most appropriate, rigorous, and relevant qualitative research tool for this purpose, and one that is cost-effective and builds community when conducted using the ODU Method described in this book. Using Focus Groups is a single, comprehensive, and practical resource that describes why, when, and how to use focus groups. The authors provide detailed guidance for using focus groups, from developing the research questions with stakeholders, through training and recruiting moderators, and identifying and recruiting participants, to the logistics of conducting focus groups, and ultimately analyzing data and developing final reports. Conversational vignettes illustrate the discussions that regularly occur in each step and help the reader better understand the process. Fifteen appendices provide templates and examples of every part of the process. Written particularly for institutional research and assessment staff and upper-level administrators, this book will also appeal to deans, department and program chairs and directors, faculty leaders, and administrative unit directors, including those in auxiliary and student services, alumni associations, and university foundations. It also serves as an excellent resource for higher education research methods courses. The authors are uniquely positioned to guide readers in this process. The team developed and refined this technique over two decades at Old Dominion University. They have conducted over 100 focus groups with campus, nonprofit, local, and international community organizations to assist them in assessing student learning, transition, and preparedness for the workforce, as well as evaluating organizations work and planning future projects.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 596 0 / $125.00
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Paper: 978 1 62036 597 7 / $32.50
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E-Book: 978 1 62036 599 1 / $25.99
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Where Tenure Does Not Reign
Colleges with Contract Systems
Presents the experiences of campuses without tenure and campuses where faculty may choose tenure or contracts. Issues covered include academic freedom, faculty recruitment, selectivity, turnover, and reward structures. Answers the question, "What lessons can be learned from campuses with contract systems?"

Paper: 978 1 56377 086 9 / $15.95
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Women at the Top
What Women University and College Presidents Say About Effective Leadership
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about the women who fill this particular role. This book—the first in a series that explores women leaders in different contexts—remedies this gap by presenting the reflections of nine women community college, college, and university presidents on what they see as key tenets of leadership, illuminated by pivotal events in their careers. These presidents know the power of words, and in telling their stories through these interviews with the authors, they let us know who they are, what their visions are, and what they value. While they express some differences in their emphases on particular leadership characteristics, they show remarkable unanimity in their beliefs as to which are the most important—competence, credibility, and communication. The participants discuss the growing opportunities for women in higher education administration, without minimizing the barriers that still exist, nor the potential for backlash against powerful and assertive women. They stress the need for women to be very careful about making the correct choices for themselves; to balance personal life and work; and to appropriately prepare for leadership. This book both breaks new ground, and offers guidance for women who aspire to positions of leadership—in any field of endeavor. The Presidents: Gretchen M. Bataille, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas Barbara Douglass, Northwestern Connecticut Community College, Winsted, CT Mildred García, California State University, Dominguez Hills Carol C. Harter, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Mamie Howard-Golladay, Sullivan County Community College, Loch Sheldrake, NY Martha T. Nesbitt, Gainesville State College, Gainesville, Georgia Pamela Sue Shockley-Zalabak, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs Betty L. Siegel, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA Karen Gayton Swisher, Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence, KS Each confronts her world with grace, her work with passion, and her life with enthusiasm. The Series: Pathways to Leadership is a series about successful women who have reached the pinnacle of their careers. It features stories about extraordinary women who have found paths to success—whether it’s leading a college or university or becoming successful scholars in science and engineering or thriving in some other male-dominated arena.

Paper: 978 1 57922 256 7 / $22.50
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Women in Academe
Set: 978 1 57922 407 3 / $75.00
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