Back to Compact.org
We are pleased to offer
20% off of book prices
for Campus Compact member campuses.
CampusCompact - Race & Diversity

Race & Diversity

 
Advancing Black Male Student Success From Preschool Through Ph.D.
Advancing Black Male Student Success presents a comprehensive portrait of Black male students at every stage in the U.S. education system: preschool and kindergarten; elementary, middle and high schools; community colleges and four-year postsecondary institutions; and master’s and doctoral programs. Each chapter is a synthesis of existing research on experience, educational outcomes, and persistent inequities at each pipeline point. Throughout the book, data are included to provide statistical portraits of the status of Black boys and men. Authors include, in each chapter, forward-thinking recommendations for education policy, research and practice. Each chapter is a synthesis of existing research on experience, educational outcomes, and persistent inequities at each pipeline point. Throughout the book, data are included to provide statistical portraits of the status of Black boys and men. Authors include, in each chapter, forward-thinking recommendations for education policy, research and practice. Most published scholarship on Black male students blames them and their families for their failures in school. This literature is replete with hopeless, pathological portrayals of this population. Through this deficit thinking and resultant practices, Black boys and men have continually experienced disparate outcomes. This book departs from prior scholarship in that the editors and authors argue that much is done to Black male students, which explains their troubled status in U.S. education. In addition to the editors’ expertise on the topic, the authorship cast includes several scholars who are among the most respected thought leaders on Black male students in education.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 183 2 / $90.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 184 9 / $25.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 186 3 / $20.99
ADD TO CART

 
Answering the Call
African American Women in Higher Education Leadership
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about women, particularly minority women, who fill this particular role. This book presents the stories, and the reflections on their paths to leadership in higher education, of seven African American women. Each has been the first woman, first African American, or first African American woman in one or more of the positions of authority that she has held. Each has overcome the double bind of sexism and racism that can inhibit the professional attainment of African American women. Although they followed different paths to leadership, similarities in their experiences, values, and beliefs emerge. They also express a need to give back to those communities that nourished their growth and leadership – of which this book is a manifestation. At a time when significant turnover in college leadership is about to occur – presenting increased opportunities for women and minorities – these leaders hope that the strategies they describe, the insights they impart, the experiences they recount, and, most of all, the passion they have sustained for the betterment of and greater inclusiveness in higher education, will inspire the next generation of women to answer the leadership call.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 253 6 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 254 3 / $26.95
ADD TO CART

 
Bandwidth Recovery
Helping Students Reclaim Cognitive Resources Lost to Poverty, Racism, and Social Marginalization
Foreword by Lynn Pasquerella
This book argues that the cognitive resources for learning of over half our young people have been diminished by the negative effects of economic insecurity, discrimination and hostility against non-majority groups based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender identity, and other aspects of difference. Recognizing that these students are no different than their peers in terms of cognitive capacity, this book offers a set of strategies and interventions to rebuild the available cognitive resources necessary to succeed in college and reach their full potential. Members of these groups systematically experience conditions in their lives that result in chronic stress and, therefore, decreased physical and mental health and social and economic opportunity. The costs of the many kinds of scarcity in their lives – money, health, respect, safety, affirmation, choices, belonging – is seriously reduced “mental bandwidth,” the cognitive and emotional resources needed to deal with making good decisions, learning, healthy relationships, and more. People who are operating with depleted mental bandwidth are less able to succeed in school, starting in childhood, and are much less likely to make it to college. For those who do make it, their bandwidth capacity often interferes with learning, and therefore, persisting and graduating from college. This book presents variety of evidence-based interventions that have been shown, through implementation in high schools and colleges, to help students to regain bandwidth. They are variously intended for application inside and outside the classroom and address not only cognitive processes but also social-psychological, non-cognitive factors that are relevant to the college environment as a whole. Beginning with an analysis of the impacts on mental and physical health and cognitive capacity, of poverty, racism, and other forms of social marginalization, Cia Verschelden presents strategies for promoting a growth mindset and self-efficacy, for developing supports that build upon students’ values and prior knowledge and for creating learning environments both in and out of the classroom so students can feel a sense of belonging and community. She addresses issues of stereotyping and exclusion and discusses institutional structures and processes that create identity-safe rather than identity-threat learning environment. This book is intended for faculty, student affairs professionals, and college and university administrators, all of whom have an interest in creating learning environments where all students have a chance to succeed. Published in association with AAC&U

Cloth: 978 1 62036 604 2 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 605 9 / $27.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 607 3 / $21.99
ADD TO CART

Beyond Access
Indigenizing Programs for Native American Student Success
Foreword by George S. McClellan
This book argues that two principal factors are inhibiting Native students from transitioning from school to college and from succeeding in their post-secondary studies. It presents models and examples of pathways to success that align with Native American students’ aspirations and cultural values. Many attend schools that are poorly resourced where they are often discouraged from aspiring to college. Many are alienated from the educational system by a lack of culturally appropriate and meaningful environment or support systems that reflect Indigenous values of community, sharing, honoring extended family, giving-back to one’s community, and respect for creation. The contributors to this book highlight Indigenized college access programs, meaning programs developed by, not just for, the Indigenous community, and are adapted, or developed, for the unique Indigenous populations they serve. Individual chapters cover a K-12 program to develop a Native college-going culture through community engagement; a “crash course” offered by a higher education institution to compensate for the lack of college counseling and academic advising at students’ schools; the role of tribal colleges and universities; the recruitment and retention of Native American students in STEM and nursing programs; financial aid; educational leadership programs to prepare Native principals, superintendents, and other school leaders; and, finally, data regarding Native American college students with disabilities. The chapters are interspersed with narratives from current Indigenous graduate students. This is an invaluable resource for student affairs practitioners and higher education administrators wanting to understand and serve their Indigenous students.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 287 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 288 4 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 290 7 / $29.99
ADD TO CART

 
Beyond the Asterisk
Understanding Native Students in Higher Education
Foreword by John Garland
A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 While the success of higher education and student affairs is predicated on understanding the students we serve, the reality is, where the Native American population is concerned, that this knowledge is generally lacking. This lack may be attributed to this population’s invisibility within the academy – it is often excluded from institutional data and reporting, and frequently noted as not statistically significant – and its relegation to what is referred to as the “American Indian research asterisk.” The purpose of this book is to move beyond the asterisk in an effort to better understand Native students, challenge the status quo, and provide an informed base for leaders in student and academic affairs, and administrators concerned with the success of students on their campuses. The authors of this book share their understanding of Native epistemologies, culture, and social structures, offering student affairs professionals and institutions a richer array of options, resources, and culturally-relevant and inclusive models to better serve this population. The book begins by providing insights into Native student experiences, presenting the first-year experience from a Native perspective, illustrating the role of a Native living/learning community in student retention, and discussing the importance of incorporating culture into student programming for Native students as well as the role of Native fraternities and sororities. The authors then consider administrative issues, such as the importance of outreach to tribal nations, the role of Tribal Colleges and Universities and opportunities for collaborations, and the development of Native American Student Services Units. . The book concludes with recommendations for how institutions can better serve Native students in graduate programs, the role that Indigenous faculty play in student success, and how professional associations can assist student affairs professionals with fulfilling their role of supporting the success of Native American students, staff, and faculty. This book moves beyond the asterisk to provide important insights from Native American higher education leaders and non-Native practitioners who have made Native students a priority in their work. While predominantly addressed to the student affairs profession – providing an understanding of the needs of the Native students it serves, describing the multi-faceted and unique issues, characteristics and experiences of this population, and sharing proven approaches to developing appropriate services – it also covers issues of broader administrative concern, such as collaboration with tribal colleges; as well academic issues, such as graduate and professional education. The book covers new material, as well as expanding on topics previously addressed in the literature, including Native American Greek organizations, incorporating Native culture into student programming, and the role of Native American Special Advisors. The contributors are themselves products of colleges and universities where Native students are too often invisible, and who succeeded despite the odds. Their insights and the examples they provide add richness to this book. It will provide a catalyst for new higher education practices that lead to direct, and increased support for, Native Americans and others who are working to remove the Native American asterisk from research and practice.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 623 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 624 4 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 626 8 / $29.99
ADD TO CART

 
Brothers of the Academy
Up and Coming Black Scholars Earning Our Way in Higher Education
Edited by Lee Jones
Foreword by Na'im Akbar
Where are the black males in higher education? How come so few African American men have obtained Ph.D.s, and their number is declining? Why are they falling further behind the performance of African American women, and society as a whole? Through chapters by twenty-seven black male scholars, this extraordinary book uniquely combines studies of the history and social position of black men in the academy with compelling narratives of how these brothers have progressed in their chosen careers despite the odds. Woven into a purposeful whole, Brothers in the Academy presents three facets of what it means to be a black man in the academy, and demonstrates what black men can and have contributed to the scholarly enterprise. The opening section presents research on race and the academy, and makes a telling contribution to the debate. Its chapters explore such topics as the evolution of desegregation in American education; overlooked data on undergraduate enrollment statistics; the representation of African Americans in college administration; and the relationship of racial identity to educational outcomes. Part two presents ten narratives of brothers who gained Ph.D.'s in a variety of disciplines. The book concludes by showcasing the work of black scholars from disciplines as diverse as Egyptology and psychology. Their work is emblematic of what occurs at the intersection of rigorous scholarship with the intellectual insights and concerns of African American men. This is a book for all leaders and administrators in higher education concerned about issues of diversity and equity. Most importantly, for black educators and community leaders who want to increase participation in higher education; and for students considering personal fulfillment through higher degrees and an academic or professional career, it offers challenges, insight and inspiration.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 027 3 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

 
Building on Resilience
Models and Frameworks of Black Male Success Across the P-20 Pipeline
Foreword by Tim King
How do we fix the leaky educational pipeline into a conduit of success for Black males? That the issue is critical is demonstrated by the statistics that only 10% of Black males in the United States are proficient in 8th grade reading, only 52% graduate from high school within four years, and only 35 percent graduate from college. This book uniquely examines the trajectory of Black males through the educational pipeline from pre-school through college. In doing so it not only contributes significantly to the scholarship on the experiences of this population, but bridges the gap between theory and practice to provide frameworks and models that will improve these young men’s educational outcomes throughout their educational journeys. A compelling feature of the book is that that it does not treat Black males as homogeneous, but recognizes the diversity that exists among Black males in various educational settings. It demonstrates the need to recognize students’ intersectionalities and individual characteristics as an essential preliminary to developing practices to improve outcomes at every educational stage. Throughout, the contributing authors also focus on the strategies and experiences of Black males who achieve academic excellence, examining growth-producing and asset-based practices that can be sustained, and that build upon the recognition that these males have agency and possess qualities such as resilience that are essential to their learning and development. The frameworks and models that conclude each chapter are equally commendable to K–12 educators and administrators; higher education faculty, student affairs practitioners, and administrators; and policymakers, for whom templates are provided for rectifying the continuing inequities of our educational system.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 961 0 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 962 7 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 964 1 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
The Case for Affirmative Action on Campus
Concepts of Equity, Considerations for Practice
* Marshalls the arguments for affirmative action * Offers strategies for action Why is affirmative action under attack? What were the policy’s original purposes, and have they been achieved? What are the arguments being arrayed against it? And–for all stakeholders concerned about equity and diversity on campus–what’s the way forward, politically, legally, and practically? The authors explore the historical context, the philosophical and legal foundations of affirmative action, present contemporary attitudes to the issue on and off campus, and uncover the tactics and arguments of its opponents. They conclude by offering strategies to counter the erosion of affirmative action, change the basis of the discourse, and coordinate institutional support to foster inclusive college environments and multi-ethnic campus communities. This book analyzes the ideological and legal construction of colorblind legislation that has led to the de facto exclusion of people of color from institutions of higher education. It addresses the role of the courts in affecting affirmative action in higher education as a workplace and place of study. It documents the under-representation of collegians of color and presents research on student opinion on race-based policies at two- and four-year institutions. It details the pervasiveness of the affirmative action debate across educational sectors and the status of race among myriad factors considered in college admissions. Finally, it considers affirmative action as a pipeline issue and in the light of educational policy.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 102 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 103 4 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

 
The Chief Diversity Officer
Strategy Structure, and Change Management
Foreword by Mark A. Emmert
This volume addresses the role of chief diversity officers as coordinating and integrating diversity leaders in higher education and other sectors. Having established in a companion volume the parameters for an effective diversity strategy, the authors address such questions as: What is a chief diversity officer? How might we create dynamic chief diversity officer infrastructures? What models of CDO structure exist in the academy? What misperceptions often confound the work of officers and the institutions they work within? What key competencies are necessary to lead as a CDO? How does the CDO role compare across higher education, non-profit, and corporate sectors? And how might the role serve as an important contributor to a collaborative vision for change and transformation in the academy? This book begins by delineating the evolution of the chief diversity officer role in the academy. Drawing on extensive qualitative and quantitative research on CDOs conducted for the purposes of this volume, it describes how the scope and responsibilities are variously defined at the organizations where the position has been created, and offers insights into the complexities and challenges of the role. On the basis of this data and the literature on organizational design and change management, the authors define the requisite skills, knowledge and background to be effective, review the alternative organizational and governance structures under which CDOs operate, and in so doing present the Chief Diversity Officer Development Framework as a basis for recruiting candidates, for structuring the position to succeed, and for providing prospective and incumbent CDOs with a realistic sense of the scope of the role. This title is also available in a set with its companion volume, Strategic Diversity Leadership.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 235 2 / $49.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 818 7 / $39.99
ADD TO CART

 
Closing the Opportunity Gap
Identity-Conscious Strategies for Retention and Student Success
Edited by Vijay Pendakur
Foreword by Shaun R. Harper
This book offers a novel and proven approach to the retention and success of underrepresented students. It advocates a strategic approach through which an institution sets clear goals and metrics and integrates the identity support work of cultural / diversity centers with skill building through cohort activities, enabling students to successfully navigate college, graduate on time and transition to the world of work. Underlying the process is an intersectional and identity-conscious, rather than identity-centered, framework that addresses the complexity of students’ assets and needs as they encounter the unfamiliar terrain of college. In the current landscape of higher education, colleges and universities normally divide their efforts between departments and programs that explicitly work on developing students’ identities and separate departments or programs that work on retaining and graduating higher-risk students. This book contends that the gap between cultural/diversity centers and institutional retention efforts is both a missed opportunity and one that perpetuates the opportunity gap between students of color and low-income students and their peers. Identity-consciousness, the central framework of this book, differs from an identity-centric approach where the identity itself is the focus of the intervention. For example, a Latino men’s program can be developed as an identity-centered initiative if the outcomes of the program are all tied to a deeper or more complex understanding of one’s Latino-ness and/or masculinity. Alternately, this same program can be an identity-conscious student success program if it is designed from the ground up with the students’ racial and gender identities in mind, but the intended outcomes are tied to student success, such as term-to-term credit completion, yearly persistence, engagement in high-impact practices, or timely graduation. Following the introductory chapter focused on framing how we understand risk and success in the academy, the remaining chapters present programmatic interventions that have been tested and found effective for students of color, working class college students, and first-generation students. Each chapter opens with a student story to frame the problem, outlines the key research that informs the program, and offers sufficient descriptive information for staff or faculty considering implementing a similar identity-conscious intervention on their campus. The chapters conclude with a discussion of assessment, and suggested “Action Items” as starting points.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 311 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 312 6 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 314 0 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Confronting Equity Issues on Campus
Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice
Foreword by David Longanecker
How can it be that 50 years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act, our institutions of higher education have still not found ways of reducing the higher education gaps for racial and ethnic groups? That is the question that informs and animates the Equity Scorecard model of organizational change. It shifts institutions’ focus from what students do (or fail to do) to what institutions can do—through their practices and structures, as well as the actions of their leaders and faculty—to produce equity in outcomes for racially marginalized populations. Drawing on the theory of action research, it creates a structure for practitioners to become investigators of their own institutional culture, to become aware of racial disparities, confront their own practices and learn how things are done on their own turf to ask: In what ways am I contributing to equity/inequity? The Equity Scorecard model differs significantly from traditional approaches to effecting change by creating institutional teams to examine and discuss internal data about student outcomes, disaggregated by race and ethnicity. The premise of the project is that institutional data acts as a powerful trigger for group learning about inequities in educational outcomes, and that the likelihood of improving those outcomes increases if the focus is on those things within the immediate control of the participating leaders and practitioners. Numerous institutions have successfully used The Equity Scorecard’s data tools and processes of self-reflection to uncover and document the behaviors and structures that lead to failure to retain and graduate students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds with a history of unequal opportunity; and to create the climate for faculty and staff to take ownership of the issues and develop sustainable practices to eliminate racial disparities in academic performance. The Scorecard can be used at a small-scale to analyze individual courses or programs, as well as broader institutional issues. This book presents the underlying concept of funds of knowledge for race-conscious expertise that informs this process, describes its underlying theories; defines the attributes needed to achieve equity-minded practice; demonstrates, through examples of implementation, what different institutions have learned, and what they have achieved; and provides a blueprint for action for higher education as a whole. For college leaders, instructors and support staff who feel the pressure—moral or otherwise—to close the racial equity gap that their institutions produce year after year, this book provides the structure, knowledge and tools to do so. It is also of value to scholars and students of higher education who have an interest in the study of organizational change.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 707 4 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 708 1 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 710 4 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Critical Mentoring
A Practical Guide
Foreword by Bernadette Sánchez
This book introduces the concept of critical mentoring, presenting its theoretical and empirical foundations, and providing telling examples of what it looks like in practice, and what it can achieve. At this juncture when the demographics of our schools and colleges are rapidly changing, critical mentoring provides mentors with a new and essential transformational practice that challenges deficit-based notions of protégés, questions their forced adaptation to dominant ideology, counters the marginalization and minoritization of young people of color, and endows them with voice, power and choice to achieve in society while validating their culture and values. Critical mentoring places youth at the center of the process, challenging norms of adult and institutional authority and notions of saviorism to create collaborative partnerships with youth and communities that recognize there are multiple sources of expertise and knowledge. Torie Weiston-Serdan outlines the underlying foundations of critical race theory, cultural competence and intersectionality, describes how collaborative mentoring works in practice in terms of dispositions and structures, and addresses the implications of rethinking about the purposes and delivery of mentoring services, both for mentors themselves and the organizations for which they work. Each chapter ends with a set of salient questions to ask and key actions to take. These are meant to move the reader from thought to action and provide a basis for discussion. This book offers strategies that are immediately applicable and will create a process that is participatory, emancipatory and transformative.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 551 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 552 6 / $24.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 554 0 / $19.99
ADD TO CART

 
Critical Race Spatial Analysis
Mapping to Understand and Address Educational Inequity
How does space illuminate educational inequity? Where and how can spatial analysis be used to disrupt educational inequity? Which tools are most appropriate for the spatial analysis of educational equity? This book addresses these questions and explores the use of critical spatial analysis to uncover the dimensions of entrenched and systemic racial inequities in educational settings and identify ways to redress them. The contributors to this book – some of whom are pioneering scholars of critical race spatial analysis theory and methodology – demonstrate the application of the theory and tools applied to specific locales, and in doing so illustrate how this spatial and temporal lens enriches traditional approaches to research. The opening macro-theoretical chapter lays the foundation for the book, rooting spatial analyses in critical commitments to studying injustice. Among the innovative methodological chapters included in this book is the re-conceptualization of mapping and space beyond the simple exploration of external spaces to considering internal geographies, highlighting how the privileged may differ in socio-spatial thinking from oppressed communities and what may be learned from both perspectives; data representations that allow the construction of varied narratives based on differences in positionality and historicity of perspectives; the application of redlining to the analysis of classroom interactions; the use of historical archives to uncover the process of marginalization; and the application of techniques such as the fotonovela and GIS to identify how spaces are defined and can be reimagined. The book demonstrates the analytical and communicative power of mapping and its potential for identifying and dismantling racial injustice in education. The editors conclude by drawing connections across sections, and elucidating the tensions and possibilities for future research. Contributors Benjamin Blaisdell Graham S. Garlick Leigh Anna Hidalgo Mark C. Hogrebe Joshua Radinsky Daniel G. Solórzano William F. Tate Verónica N. Vélez Federico R. Waitoller

Cloth: 978 1 62036 423 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 424 6 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 426 0 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Cultivating Social Justice Teachers
How Teacher Educators Have Helped Students Overcome Cognitive Bottlenecks and Learn Critical Social Justice Concepts
Foreword by David O. Stovall
Frustrated by the challenge of opening teacher education students to a genuine understanding of the social justice concepts vital for creating an equitable learning environment? Do your students ever resist accepting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer people experience bias or oppression, or that their experiences even belong in a conversation about “diversity,” “multiculturalism,” or “social justice?” Recognizing these are common experiences for teacher educators, the contributors to this book present their struggles and achievements in developing approaches that have successfully guided students to complex understandings of such threshold concepts as White privilege, homophobia, and heteronormativity, overcoming the “bottlenecks” that impede progress toward bigger learning goals and understandings. The authors initiate a conversation – one largely absent in the social justice education literature and the discourse – about the common content- and pedagogy-related challenges that social justice educators face in their work, particularly for those doing this work in relative or literal isolation, where collegial understanding cannot be found down the hall or around the corner. In doing so they hope not only to help individual teachers in their practice, but also strengthen social justice teacher education more systemically. Each contributor identifies a learning bottleneck related to one or two specific threshold concepts that they have struggled to help their students learn. Each chapter is a narrative about individual efforts toward sometimes profound pedagogical adjustment, about ambiguity and cognitive dissonance and resistance, about trial and error, and about how these educators found ways to facilitate foundational social justice learning among a diversity of education students. Although this is not intended to be a “how-to” manual, or to provide five easy steps to enable straight students to “get” heteronormativity, each chapter does describe practical strategies that teachers might adapt as part of their own practice.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 887 3 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 888 0 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 890 3 / $25.99
ADD TO CART

 
Culture Centers in Higher Education
Perspectives on Identity, Theory, and Practice
Edited by Lori D. Patton
Are cultural centers ethnic enclaves of segregation, or safe havens that provide minority students with social support that promotes persistence and retention? Though Black cultural centers boast a 40-year history, there is much misinformation about them and the ethnic counterparts to which they gave rise. Moreover, little is known about their historical roots, current status, and future prospects. The literature has largely ignored the various culture center models, and the role that such centers play in the experiences of college students. This book fills a significant void in the research on ethnic minority cultural centers, offers the historic background to their establishment and development, considers the circumstances that led to their creation, examines the roles they play on campus, explores their impact on retention and campus climate, and provides guidelines for their management in the light of current issues and future directions. In the first part of this volume, the contributors provide perspectives on culture centers from the point of view of various racial/ethnic identity groups, Latina/o, Asian, American Indian, and African American. Part II offers theoretical perspectives that frame the role of culture centers from the point of view of critical race theory, student development theory, and a social justice framework. Part III focuses specifically on administrative and practice-oriented themes, addressing such issues as the relative merits of full- and part-time staff, of race/ethnic specific as opposed to multicultural centers, relations with the outside community, and integration with academic and student affairs to support the mission of the institution. For administrators and student affairs educators who are unfamiliar with these facilities, and want to support an increasingly diverse student body, this book situates such centers within the overall strategy of improving campus climate, and makes the case for sustaining them. Where none as yet exist, this book offers a rationale and blueprint for creating such centers. For leaders of culture centers this book constitutes a valuable tool for assessing their viability, improving their performance, and ensuring their future relevance – all considerations of increased importance when budgets and resources are strained. This book also provides a foundation for researchers interested in further investigating the role of these centers in higher education.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 231 4 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 232 1 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 512 4 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Daring to Educate
The Legacy of the Early Spelman College Presidents
Foreword by Johnnetta B. Cole
While President Emerita Johnnetta B. Cole is credited with propelling Spelman College (the oldest historically Black womens’ college) to national prominence, little is generally known about the strong academic foundation and legacy she inherited. Contrary to popular belief, the first four presidents of Spelman (including its two co-founders) were White women who led the early development of the College, armed with the belief that former slaves and free Black women should and could receive a college-level education. This book presents the history of Spelman’s foundation through the tenure of its fourth president, Florence M. Read, which ended in 1953. This compelling story is brought up to date by the contributions of Spelman’s current president, Beverly Daniel Tatum, and by Johnnetta B. Cole. The book chronicles how the vision each of these women presidents, and their response to changing social forces, both profoundly shaped Spelman’s curriculum and influenced the lives and minds of thousands of young Black women. The authors trace the evolution of Spelman from its beginning–when the founders, aware of the limited occupations open to its graduates, strove to uplift the Black race by providing an academic education to disenfranchised Black women while also providing training for available careers--to the fifties when the college became an exemplar of liberal arts education in the South. This book fills a void in the history of Black women in higher education. It will appeal to a wide readership interested in women’s studies, Black history and the history of higher education in general.

Paper: 978 1 57922 109 6 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

 
The Department Chair as Transformative Diversity Leader
Building Inclusive Learning Environments in Higher Education
Foreword by Walter H. Gmelch
With the imminent demographic shifts in our society and the need to prepare students for citizenship in a global, knowledge-based society, the role of the academic department chair in creating diverse and inclusive learning environments is arguably the most pivotal position in higher education today. In the United States, increasing minority student enrollment coupled with the emergence of a minority majority American nation by 2042 demands that academic institutions be responsive to these changing demographics. The isolation of the ivory tower is no longer an option. This is the first book to address the role of the department chair in diversity and addresses an unmet need by providing a research-based, systematic approach to diversity leadership in the academic department based upon survey findings and in-person interviews. The department chair represents the nexus between the faculty and the administration and is positioned uniquely to impact diversity progress. Research indicates that more than 80 percent of academic decisions regarding appointment, curriculum, tenure and promotion, classroom pedagogy, and student outcomes are made by the department chair in consultation with the faculty. This book examines the multidimensional contributions that chairs make in advancing diversity within their departments and institutions in the representation of diverse faculty and staff; in tenure and promotion; curricular change; student learning outcomes; and departmental climate. The scope and content of the book is not limited to institutions in the United States but is applicable to academic institutions globally in their efforts to address the access and success of increasingly diverse student populations. It addresses institutional power structures and the role of the dean in relation to the appointment of chairs and their impact on the success of chairs from non-dominant groups, including female, minority, and lesbian/gay/transgendered individuals who serve in predominantly white male departments. Using qualitative and quantitative research methods, the book analyzes predominant structural and behavioral barriers that can impede diversity progress within the academic department. It then focuses upon the opportunities and challenges chairs face in their collaborative journey with faculty and administration toward inclusive departmental and institutional practices. Each chapter provides concrete strategies that chairs can use to strengthen diversity in the academic department. Addressed to department chairs, deans, faculty, and administrative leaders in higher education in all Western societies facing demographic change and global challenges, this book offers a critical road map to creating the successful academic institutions that will meet the needs of our changing populations.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 237 2 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 238 9 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 240 2 / $25.99
ADD TO CART

 
Designing Transformative Multicultural Initiatives
Theoretical Foundations, Practical Applications, and Facilitator Considerations
Edited by Sherry K. Watt
Foreword by Marybeth Gasman
Higher education is facing a perfect storm as it contends with changing demographics, shrinking budgets and concerns about access and cost, while underrepresented groups – both in faculty ranks and students – are voicing dissatisfaction with campus climate and demanding changes to structural inequities. This book argues that, to address the inexorable changes ahead, colleges and universities need both to centralize the value of diversity and inclusion and employ a set of strategies that are enacted at all levels of their institutions. It argues that individual and institutional change efforts can only be achieved by implementing “diversity as a value” – that is embracing social change efforts as central and additive rather than episodic and required – and provides the research and theoretical frameworks to support this approach, as well as tools and examples of practice that accomplish change. The contributors to this book identify the elements that drive successful multicultural initiatives and that strengthen the effectiveness of campus efforts to dismantle systemic oppression, as well as the individual and organization skills needed to manage difference effectively. Among these is developing the capacity of administrators, faculty and student affairs professionals as conscious scholar practitioners to sensitively manage conflicts on campus, deconstruct challenging structures and reconstruct the environment intentionally to include in respectful ways experiences of historically marginalized groups and non-dominant ways of being in the world. The books’ focus on developing capacities for multicultural competence aligns with higher education’s increasing emphasis on civic engagement and institutional goals promote skills to interact in meaningful and responsible ways around difference, whether of people, ideas or identities. Designing Transformative Multicultural Initiatives provides guiding principles and practical strategies to successfully transform higher education to become fully inclusive and advance the success of all constituents and stakeholders.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 059 0 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 060 6 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 062 0 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Disrupting the Culture of Silence
Confronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education
Foreword by Penny A. Pasque
CHOICE 2015 Outstanding Academic Title What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or “hostile” work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women’s race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations? How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work climates? What actions can institutions and individuals–independently and collectively–take toward equity in the academy? Despite tremendous progress toward gender equality and equity in institutions of higher education, deep patterns of discrimination against women in the academy persist. From the “chilly climate” to the “old boys’ club,” women academics must navigate structures and cultures that continue to marginalize, penalize, and undermine their success. This book is a “tool kit” for advancing greater gender equality and equity in higher education. It presents the latest research on issues of concern to them, and to anyone interested in a more equitable academy. It documents the challenging, sometimes hostile experiences of women academics through feminist analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, including narratives from women of different races and ethnicities across disciplines, ranks, and university types. The contributors’ research draws upon the experiences of women academics including those with under-examined identities such as lesbian, feminist, married or unmarried, and contingent faculty. And, it offers new perspectives on persistent issues such as family policies, pay and promotion inequalities, and disproportionate service burdens. The editors provide case studies of women who have encountered antagonistic workplaces, and offer action steps, best practices, and more than 100 online resources for individuals navigating similar situations. Beyond women in academe, this book is for their allies and for administrators interested in changing the climates, cultures, and policies that allow gender inequality to exist on their campuses, and to researchers/scholars investigating these phenomena. It aims to disrupt complacency amongst those who claim that things are “better” or “good enough” and to provide readers with strategies and resources to counter barriers created by culture, climate, or institutional structures.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 217 4 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 218 1 / $34.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 220 4 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Diverse Millennial Students in College
Implications for Faculty and Student Affairs
While many institutions have developed policies to address the myriad needs of Millennial college students and their parents, inherent in many of these initiatives is the underlying assumption that this student population is a homogeneous group. This book is significant because it addresses and explores the characteristics and experiences of Millennials from an array of perspectives, taking into account not only racial and ethnic identity but also cultural background, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status differences—all factors contributing to how these students interface with academe. In providing a “voice” to “voiceless” populations of African American, Asian American, Bi/Multi-Racial, Latino, Native American, and LGBT millennial college students, this book engages with such questions as: Does the term “Millennial” apply to these under-represented students? What role does technology, pop culture, sexual orientation, and race politics play in the identity development for these populations? Do our current minority development theories apply to these groups? And, ultimately, are higher education institutions prepared to meet both the cultural and developmental needs of diverse minority groups of Millennial college students?” This book is addressed primarily to college and university administrators and faculty members who seek greater depth and understanding of the issues associated with diverse Millennial college student populations. This book informs readers about the ways in which this cohort differs from their majority counterparts to open a dialogue about how faculty members and administrators can meet their needs effectively both inside and outside the classroom. It will also be of value to student affairs personnel, students enrolled in graduate level courses in higher education and other social science courses that explore issues of college student development and diversity, particularly students planning to work with diverse Millennial college students in both clinical or practical work settings. Contributors: Rosie Maria Banda; Fred Bonner, II; Lonnie Booker, Jr.; Brian Brayboy; Mitchell Chang; Andrea Domingue; Tonya Driver; Alonzo M. Flowers; Gwen Dungy; Jami Grosser; Kandace Hinton; Mary Howard-Hamilton; Tom Jackson, Jr.; Aretha F. Marbley; Samuel Museus; Anna Ortiz; Tammie Preston-Cunningham; Nana Osei-Kofi; Kristen Renn; Petra Robinson; Genyne Royal; Victor Saenz; Rose Anna Santos; Mattyna Stephens; Terrell Strayhorn; Theresa Survillion; Nancy Jean Tubbs; Malia Villegas; Stephanie J. Waterman; Nick Zuniga.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 446 2 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 447 9 / $31.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 712 8 / $25.99
ADD TO CART

 
Doing the Public Good
Latina/o Scholars Engage Civic Participation
How can scholars reconnect themselves—and their students—to higher education’s historic but much diluted mission to work for the public good? Through the lenses of personal reflection and auto-ethnography—and drawing on such rich philosophical foundations as the Spanish tradition of higher learning, the holistic Aztec concept of education, the Hispanic notion of bien educado, and the activist principles of the Chicano movement–these writers explore the intersections of private and public good, and how the tension between them has played out in their own lives and the commitments they have made to their intellectual community, and to their cultural and family communities. Through often lyrical memoirs, reflections, and poetry, these authors recount their personal journeys and struggles—often informed by a spiritual connectedness and always driven by a concern for social justice—and show how they have found individual paths to promoting the public good in their classrooms, and in the world beyond. Contributors include: Jennifer Ayala; Dolores Delgado Bernal; Flora V Rodriguez-Brown; Kenneth P. Gonzales; Miguel Guajardo; Francisco Guajardo; Aida Hurtado; Maria A. Hurtado; Arcelia L. Hurtado, Raymond V. Padilla; Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner; and Luis Urrieta Jr.

Paper: 978 1 57922 263 5 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

 
Driving Change Through Diversity and Globalization
Transformative Leadership in the Academy
Foreword by Ronald A. Crutcher
This book significantly advances discussion of the mission of higher education in today’s multicultural environment and global economy. It sets out the challenges and considerations that must be addressed by administrative leaders, by trustees, and others who shape the vision and direction of the institution – but most particularly by academic deans and faculty. The author makes the case that the inclusion of a diversity and globalization in disciplinary work contributes to the research agendas of individual faculty and their departments, aligns with scholarly values, and promotes such student learning goals as tolerance of ambiguity and paradox, critical thinking and creativity. He offers a strategic vision of success, backed by theory and examples of effective application, for creating transformative change; and provides a roadmap to implementing inclusive pedagogical practices and curricula. With implementation dependent on leadership and participation at every level of an institution, everyone with a stake in its future should read this book.

Paper: 978 1 57922 099 0 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

 
Ebony Towers in Higher Education
The Evolution, Mission, and Presidency of Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Foreword by Lenoar Foster
What is the purpose of black colleges? Why do black colleges continue to exist? Are black colleges necessary? Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are at the same time the least studied and the least understood institutions of higher education and the most maligned and the most endangered. This unique study examines the mission of four-year HBCUs from the perspective of the campus president, as a foundation for understanding the relevance and role of these institutions. This is the first research to focus on the role of presidents of black colleges; is based on extensive interviews with fifteen presidents; and takes into particular account the type of campus environments in which they operate. Unlike community colleges, women’s colleges, men’s colleges, and Hispanic-serving colleges, Black colleges are racially identifiable institutions. They also vary significantly in, among other characteristics: size, control (public or private), religious affiliation, gender composition, and available resources. Although united in the historic mission of educating African Americans, each black college or university has its own identity and set of educational objectives. The book examines how presidents define and implement mission in the context of their campuses, view the challenges they face, and confront the factors that promote or hinder implementation of their missions.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 273 4 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 274 1 / $36.95
ADD TO CART

 
Engaged Research and Practice
Higher Education and the Pursuit of the Public Good
Foreword by Tony Chambers
What practices can researchers use to gain a more nuanced understanding of educational issues in the community and be part of the solution to those issues? Engaged Research and Practice is about two prevailing and complementary ideas that have surfaced in the higher education arena: engaged research and higher education for the public good. Engaged research is scholarship that not only attempts to open up new knowledge, but it does so with a sense that the new knowledge, insight and directions have a direct relationship to needs and problems within our communities, institutions, and policy arenas. Engaged, actionable, or participatory research and scholarship attempts to tackle the identified issues of our communities and society. This handbook offers important insights and tangible examples of how higher education leaders may work directly with communities and in policy settings to understand the deeper meanings often lost in conversations about educational opportunity. Each chapter addresses the ways in which faculty, community and administrative leaders may connect research and practice through unique research projects. The authors offer clear explanations of "how" their engaged research was conducted to illustrate explicit pathways for practitioners. This book also includes short narratives where authors involved with this research reflect on their experiences and the lessons they have learned while immersed in community and policy related work.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 439 0 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 440 6 / $39.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 442 0 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Ensuring the Success of Latino Males in Higher Education
A National Imperative
Foreword by Willliam Serrata
Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts. The question of why Latino males are losing ground in accessing higher education—relative to their peers—is an important and complex one, and it lies at the heart of this book. There are several broad themes highlighted, catalogued along with the four dimensions of policy, theory, research, and practice. The contributors to this book present new research on factors that inhibit or promote Latino success in both four-year institutions and community colleges in order to inform both policy and practice. They explore the social-cultural factors, peer dynamics, and labor force demands that may be perpetuating the growing gender gap, and consider what lessons can be learned from research on the success of Latinas. This book also closely examines key practices that enable first generation Latino male undergraduates to succeed which may seem counterintuitive to institutional expectations and preconceived notions of student behavior. Using narrative data, the book also explores the role of family in persistence; outlines how Latino men conceptualize fulfilling expectations, negotiate the emasculization of the educational process, and how they confront racialization in the pursuit of a higher education; uncovers attitudes to help-seeking that are detrimental to their success: and analyzes how those who succeed and progress in college apply their social capital – whether aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial, or resistant. While uncovering the lack of awareness at all levels of our colleges and universities about the depth and severity of the challenges facing Latino males, this book provides the foundation for rethinking policy; challenges leaders to institutionalize male-focused programs and services; and presents data to inform needed changes in practice for outreach and retention.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 787 6 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 788 3 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 790 6 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Ethnicity in College
Advancing Theory and Improving Diversity Practices on Campus
This book explores the importance, and construction, of ethnic identity among college students, and how ethnicity interfaces with students’ interactions on campus, and the communities in which they live. Based on qualitative interviews with White, Latina/o, African American and Asian students, it captures both the college context and the individual experiences students have with their ethnicity, through the immediacy of the students’ own voices. The authors observe how students negotiate their ethnic identity within the process of becoming adults. They identify the influences of family, the importance of socio-historical forces that surround students’ educational experiences, and the critical role of peers in students’ ethnic identity development. While research has begun to document the positive outcomes associated with diverse learning environments, this study emphasizes and more closely delineates, just how these outcomes come to be. In addition, the study reveals how the freedom to express and develop ethnic identity, which multicultural environments ideally support, promotes student confidence and achievement in ways which students themselves can articulate. This work is distinctive in eschewing an ethnic minority perspective through which Whites are the primary reference group, and the standard from which all ethnic and racial identity processes evolve; as well as in considering the influences that growing up in a multi-ethnic context may have on ethnic identity processes, particularly where the “other” is not White. This perspective is particularly important at a time when students entering universities are more likely to come from highly segregated high school environments, and will confront ethnic and social differences for the first time in college. This book is intended as a resource for researchers and practitioners in psychology and higher education. It offers insights for student affairs and higher education administrators and leaders about the ways in which their campus policies and practices can positively influence the development of more supportive campus climates that draw on the strengths of each ethnic group to create an overarching pluralistic culture. It can also serve as a cultural diversity text for upper division or graduate courses on pluralism. Moreover, understanding students’ ethnic identity, their personal growth, and adjustment to college, it is central to preparing individuals for life in a pluralistic society.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 051 8 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 332 8 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice
15 Stories
Foreword by Paul C. Gorski
While we are all familiar with the lives of prominent Black civil rights leaders, few of us have a sense of what is entailed in developing a White anti-racist identity. Few of us can name the White activists who joined the struggle against discrimination, let alone understand the complexities, stresses and contradictions of doing this work while benefiting from the privileges they enjoyed as Whites. This book fills that gap by vividly presenting – in their own words – the personal stories, experiences and reflections of fifteen prominent White anti-racists. They recount the circumstances that led them to undertake this work, describe key moments and insights along their journeys, and frankly admit their continuing lapses and mistakes. They make it clear that confronting oppression (including their own prejudices) – whether about race, sexual orientation, ability or other differences – is a lifelong process of learning. The chapters in this book are full of inspirational and lesson-rich stories about the expanding awareness of White social justice advocates and activists who grappled with their White privilege and their early socialization and decided to work against structural injustice and personal prejudice. The authors are also self-critical, questioning their motivations and commitments, and acknowledging that – as Whites and possessors of other privileged identities – they continue to benefit from White privilege even as they work against it. This is an eye-opening book for anyone who wants to understand what it means to be White and the reality of what is involved in becoming a White anti-racist and social justice advocate; is interested in the paths taken by those who have gone before; and wants to engage reflectively and critically in this difficult and important work. Contributing Authors Warren J. Blumenfeld Abby L. Ferber Jane K. Fernandes Michelle Fine Diane J. Goodman Paul C. Gorski Heather W. Hackman Gary R. Howard Kevin Jennings Frances E. Kendall Paul Kivel James W. Loewen Peggy McIntosh Julie O’Mara Alan Rabinowitz Andrea Rabinowitz Christine E. Sleeter

Cloth: 978 1 62036 207 5 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 208 2 / $19.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 210 5 / $15.99
ADD TO CART

 
The Evolving Challenges of Black College Students
New Insights for Policy, Practice, and Research
Foreword by Lemuel Watson
Presenting new empirical evidence and employing fresh theoretical perspectives, this book sheds new light on the challenges that Black Students face from the time they apply to college through their lives on campus. The contributors make the case that the new generation of Black students differ in attitudes and backgrounds from earlier generations, and demonstrate the importance of understanding the diversity of Black identity. Successive chapters address the nature and importance of Black spirituality for reducing isolation and race-related stress, and as a source of meaning making; students’ college selection and decision process and the expectations it fosters; first-generation Black women’s motivations for attending college; the social-psychological determinants of academic achievement, and how resiliency can be developed and nurtured; institutional climate and the role of cultural centers; as well as identity development; and mentoring. The book includes a new research study of African American male undergraduates who identify as gay or bisexual; discusses the impact of student-to-student interactions in intellectual development and leadership building; describes the successful strategies used by historically Black institutions with at-risk men; considers the role of parents in Black male students’ lives, and the applicability of the “millennial” label to the new cohort of African American students. The book offers new insights and concrete recommendations for policies and practices to provide the social and academic support for African American students to persist and fully benefit from their collegiate experience. It will be of value to student affairs personnel and faculty; constitutes a textbook for courses on student populations and their development; and provides a springboard for future research.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 245 1 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 246 8 / $33.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 566 7 / $26.99
ADD TO CART

 
Exposing the "Culture of Arrogance" in the Academy
A Blueprint for Increasing Black Faculty Satisfaction in Higher Education
There generally remains a gulf between the way most Black faculty perceive the racial climate at their institutions and the recognition by non-Black faculty and administrators that there are problems and that these perceptions have merit. This book is intended to promote a productive dialogue. This book weaves the authors’ own experiences with the responses of 136 Black faculty to a questionnaire, and a smaller sample who were interviewed, to identify the factors that determine Black faculty’s satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their jobs and institutions. Recurring themes underscore the importance of a supportive work environment that is built on mutual respect, full inclusion in the decision-making process, and an institutional climate that does not tolerate cultural insensitivity or racism. The qualitative and quantitative information and the authors’ conclusions can help postsecondary institutions improve Black faculty satisfaction levels, and ultimately, retention rates. This book will resonate with any Black faculty who have felt frustrated enough to consider leaving a postsecondary institution and with those who are content at their current institutions. For non-Black faculty and for administrators of all races, the book illuminates the sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, explains the reasons their Black colleagues leave or stay, and offers valuable recommendations for change. For anyone, at any level, interested in the issue of the racial climate at his or her institution, this book offers a constructive framework for discussion and action

Paper: 978 1 57922 113 3 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

 
From Diplomas to Doctorates
The Success of Black Women in Higher Education and its Implications for Equal Educational Opportunities for All
Foreword by Kassie Freeman
Epilogue by Wynetta Y. Lee
This volume is designed to illuminate the educational experiences of Black women, from the time they earn their high school diplomas through graduate study, with a particular focus on their doctoral studies, by exploring the commonalities and the uniqueness of their individual paths and challenges. The chapters of this volume newly identify key factors and experiences that shape Black women’s engagement or disengagement with higher education. The original research presented here – using an array of theoretical lenses, as well as qualitative and quantitative methods – not only deepens our understanding of the experiences of African American women in the academy, but also seeks to strengthen the academic pipeline, not only for the benefit of those who may have felt disenfranchised in the past, but for all students. The contributors eschew the deficit-focused approach – that implies a lack of social and cultural capital based on prior educational experiences – adopted by many studies of non-dominant groups in education, and instead focus on the strengths and experiences of their subjects. Among their findings is the identification of the social capital that Black women are given and actively acquire in their pre-collegiate years that enable them to gain greater returns on their educational investments than their male peers. The book further describes the assistance and the interference African American women receive from their peers during their transition to college, and how peer interactions shape their early college experiences, and influence subsequent persistence decisions. Whether studying how Black women in the social and natural sciences navigate through this often rocky terrain, or uncovering the extent to which African American women doctoral students access postsecondary education through community colleges, and their special needs for more mentoring and advising support, this book provides researchers and graduate students with rich information on how to successfully engage and succeed in the doctoral process. It also demonstrates to women faculty and administrators how they can become better navigators, guides, and advocates for the African American women who come after them.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 356 4 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 357 1 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 530 8 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
From Oppression to Grace
Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color--women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent--as students pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities. Women of color are frequently relegated--on account both of race and womanhood--into monolithic categories that perpetuate oppression, subdue and suppress conflict, and silence voices. This book uses critical race feminism (CRF) to place women of color in the center, rather than the margins, of the discussion, theorizing, research and praxis of their lives as they co-exist in the dominant culture. The first part of the book addresses the issues faced on the way to achieving a terminal degree: the struggles encountered and the lessons learned along the way. Part Two, "Pride and Prejudice: Finding Your Place After the Degree" describes the complexity of lives of women with multiple identities as scholars with family, friends, and lives at home and at work. The book concludes with the voices of senior faculty sharing their journeys and their paths to growth as scholars and individuals. This book is for all women of color growing up in the academy, learning to stand on their own, taking first steps, mastering the language, walking, running, falling and getting up to run again--and illuminates the process of self-definition that is essential to their growth as scholars and individuals.

Paper: 978 1 57922 111 9 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

 
Gender Identity, Equity, and Violence
Multidisciplinary Perspectives Through Service Learning
Series Edited by Gerald S. Eisman
Foreword by Robert A. Corrigan
The authors of the thirteen chapters in this volume bring excitement and innovations to teaching about gender from a wide range of theoretical and discipline perspectives. They exhibit the inclusiveness that is central to feminist pedagogy–a perspective that centers the educational enterprise in the analysis of the interconnectedness of social categories that have traditionally divided and given root to inequality and oppression and aims for no less than social transformation. Empowerment is a core value in gender education and the experiential approach nurtures that goal. This volume provides many examples of the power of learning through experience as the authors demonstrate that, “…the authority of the feminist teacher as intellectual and theorist finds expression in the goal of making students themselves theorists of their own lives by interrogating and analyzing their own experience.” (Weiler, 1991) To stimulate the adaptation of the approaches described in these books, each volume includes an Activity / Methodology table that summarizes key elements of each example, such as class size, pedagogy, and other disciplinary applications. Click here for the table to this title.

Paper: 978 1 57922 218 5 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Getting Culture
Incorporating Diversity Across the Curriculum
How do we educate our students about cultural diversity and cultural differences, and eliminate cultural ignorance, stereotyping, and prejudice? What are the conceptual issues involved in reaching this goal? How can we integrate these perspectives in disciplinary and diversity courses, and the curriculum? This book is a resource for answering these questions. Within the framework of current scholarship and discussion of essential concepts, it offers practical techniques, and empirically proven “best practices” for teaching about diversity. The book opens with a conceptual framework, covering such issues as distinguishing teaching to a diverse audience from teaching about diversity and contrasting the incorporation of culture across the curriculum with tokenistic approaches. Subsequent chapters identify classroom practices that can optimize students’ learning, especially those from culturally diverse backgrounds; describe feminist principles of education that that promote learning for all students; and address principles of effective on-line instruction for diverse populations. The book is intended for faculty integrating diversity into existing courses, and for anyone creating courses on diversity. The ideas and suggestions in the text can be incorporated into any class that includes a discussion of diversity issues or has a diverse student enrollment. The contributors offer pragmatic and tested ways of overcoming student misconceptions and resistance, and for managing emotional responses that can be aroused by the discussion of diversity. The editors aim to stimulate readers’ thinking and inspire fresh ideas. The book further provides teachers of diversity with a range of effective exercises, and attends to such issues as teacher stress and burnout. This book can also serve to inform and guide department chairs and other administrators in the design and implementation of diversity initiatives.

Paper: 978 1 57922 280 2 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

 
Hispanic-Serving Institutions in American Higher Education
Their Origin, and Present and Future Challenges
Foreword by Frank Hernandez
This is the first book to exclusively address Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), filling a major gap in both the research on these institutions and in our understanding of their approaches to learning and their role in supporting all students while focusing on Hispanic students. Born out of the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1992 and are classified as such if their enrollment of Latino students account for a quarter of their undergraduate enrollment, the number of HSIs and their impact in higher education is growing. Today there are approximately 370 HSIs, 277 emerging HSIs, and their numbers are steadily increasing. Given the projected growth of the Latino population, and HSIs’ record of advancing the success for Hispanic students in STEM fields, as well as of graduating nearly a third of all Hispanic bachelor’s degree recipients, their work has important implications for higher education at large. Written by leading and rising scholars on HSIs, this book offers insight into the complexity of these institutions. It not only addresses historic policy origins, but also describes the experiences of various student populations served, faculty issues (i.e., governance, diversity, work/life experience, etc.), the impact of student affairs in advancing student development, and considers funding and philanthropy efforts. The book also critically examines challenges that many of these institutions face – disjointed mission statements regarding support of their Latino/a student populations, governance structures that support the status quo, and the financial incentive to achieve HSI designation that may not correlate with enhancing the climate for Latinos. This book touches on the many facets of HSIs, painting an organic mosaic of institutions in position to advance Latino postsecondary progress, both chronicling the contemporary challenges that these institutions face while also looking to their future.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 143 6 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 144 3 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 146 7 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
How Black Colleges Empower Black Students
Lessons for Higher Education
Foreword by Karen A. Holbrook
To their disadvantage, few Americans--and few in higher education--know much about the successes of historically Black colleges and universities. How is it that historically Black colleges graduate so many low-income and academically poorly prepared students? How do they manage to do so well with students "as they are", even when adopting open admissions policies? In this volume, contributors from a wide spectrum of Black colleges offer insights and examples of the policies and practice--such as retention strategies, co-curricular activities and approaches to mentoring--which underpin their disproportionate success with populations that too often fail in other institutions. This book also challenges the myth that these colleges are segregated institutions and that teachers of color are essential to minority student success. HBCUs employ large numbers of non-Black faculty who demonstrate the ability to facilitate the success of African American students. This book offers valuable lessons for faculty, faculty developers, student affairs personnel and administrators in the wider higher education community–lessons that are all the more urgent as they face a growing racially diverse student population. While, for HBCUs themselves, this book reaffirms the importance of their mission today, it also raises issues they must address to maintain the edge they have achieved. Contributors: Pamela G. Arrington; Delbert Baker; Susan Baker; Stanley F. Battle; T. J. Bryan; Terrolyn P. Carter; Ronnie L. Collins; Samuel DuBois Cook; Elaine Johnson Copeland; Marcela A. Copes; Quiester Craig; Lawrence A. Davis, Jr.; Frances C. Gordon; Frank W. Hale, Jr.; B. Denise Hawkins; Karen A. Holbrook; James E. Hunter; Frank L. Matthews; Henry Ponder; Anne S. Pruitt-Logan; Talbert O. Shaw; Orlando L. Taylor ; W. Eric Thomas; M. Rick Turner; Mervyn A. Warren; Charles V. Willie; James G. Wingate.

Paper: 978 1 57922 145 4 / $31.95
ADD TO CART

 
How Minority Students Experience College
Implications for Planning and Policy
"I feel like they act like they're so diverse and multicultural.This is not a representation of how it is for people who go here." "I know of several occasions, if it weren't for several faculty of color, I don't know how I would have made it from one day to the next." -- from student interviews Have three decades of integration and multicultural initiatives in higher education delivered a better education to all students? Are majority and minority students reaping similar benefits, specifically in predominantly white colleges? Do we know what a multicultural campus should look like, and how to design one that is welcoming to all students and promotes a learning environment? Through a unique qualitative study involving seven colleges and universities considered national models of commitment to diversity, this book presents the views and voices of minority students on what has been achieved and what remains to be done. The direct quotations that form the core of this book give voice to Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American and bi-racial students. They offer in their own words their perceptions of their campus cultures and practices, the tensions they encounter and what works for them. Rather than elaborating or recommending specific models or solutions, this book aims to provide insights that will enable the reader better to understand and articulate the issues that need to be addressed to achieve a well-adapted multicultural campus. Presidents, academic affairs professionals, student affairs personnel and faculty concerned with equity and diversity will find this book helpful and enlightening.

Paper: 978 1 57922 049 5 / $25.95
ADD TO CART

 
Included In Communication
Learning Climates that Cultivate Racial and Ethnic Diversity
Edited by Judith Trent
Series Edited by Carolyn Vasques-Scalera
A practice-oriented volume written by communication faculty for their colleagues and others who care about the retention and success of students of color in the discipline's gateway courses. Associate editors: Wenshu Lee, Mark Lawrence McPhail, and Dolores Valencia Tanno. Consulting reviewer, Orlando L. Taylor.

Paper: 978 1 56377 051 7 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Included In English Studies
Learning Climates that Cultivate Racial and Ethnic Diversity
A practice-oriented volume written by English Studies faculty for their colleagues and others who care about the retention and success of students of color in the discipline's gateway courses.

Paper: 978 1 56377 056 2 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Included In Sociology
Learning Climates that Cultivate Racial and Ethnic Diversity
A practice-oriented volume written by sociology faculty for their colleagues and others who care about the retention and success of students of color in the discipline's gateway courses.

Paper: 978 1 56377 055 5 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Intersectionality in Action
A Guide for Faculty and Campus Leaders for Creating Inclusive Classrooms and Institutions
Foreword by Eboo Patel
Colleges and universities silo diversity and inclusion by creating specific courses to address them, or programs to welcome and support people with a range of identities, whereas in reality students, faculty and staff do not encounter diversity in the fractured ways that match the organizational structures of our institutions. We all simultaneously embody a variety of identities with different saliency in different circumstances and times. This book offers models for institutions to move intentionally toward intersections – of study abroad and multiculturalism, of race and gender and religion, and of other essential aspects of our educational programs and our students’ identities – to open doors to new possibilities that better prepare our students for life in a diverse world, and that allow our institutions to become more efficient and effective as we strive to not simply do things better in our own separate spheres, but to do better things by working together across difference. Each chapter offers action-oriented analysis focusing on particular campus intersections, rather than attending to specific demographic groups. Chapter authors also build on their own local expertise of doing this work on campuses that often do not have deep pockets or rich histories of such efforts. The book is organized into three sections: * People focuses on diversity broadly defined, considering questions about how we recruit and engage the students, faculty, and staff in the campus community, and how we work with governing boards and others to promote inclusive excellence. * Environment focuses on inclusion, including residence life, the local community, the working and learning environment, and external factors and events such as national and international news or town gown relationships. * Learning focuses on perspective taking and learning about difference in the core curriculum, the disciplines, and the co-curriculum, as well as professional development for faculty and staff. This ground reaking book helps readers, no matter what position they occupy on campus, to develop the knowledge and capacities necessary to create inclusive classrooms and is premised on the understanding that identity, oppression, power and marginalization cannot be addressed by looking solely at single identities.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 319 5 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 320 1 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 322 5 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Journey to the Ph.D.
How to Navigate the Process as African Americans
Foreword by Brenda Jarmon
As a new generation of African Americans completes college, an increasing number of students are aspiring to the Ph.D. as a stepping stone to a career in the academy and to fully participate in shaping our society. Most African Americans are conscious that they are the first in their families to embark on this journey. They are aware they will meet barriers and prejudice, are likely to face isolation and frustration, and find few sources of support along the way. This book, by twenty-four Black scholars who “have been there,” offers a guide to aspiring doctoral students to the formal process and to the personal, emotional and intellectual challenges they are likely to face. The authors come from a wide range of disciplines – from computing, education and literature to science and sociology. Although their experiences and backgrounds are as varied as they are as individuals, their richly diverse chapters cohere into a rounded guide to the issues for those who follow in their footsteps. From questioning the reader about his or her reasons for pursuing a doctorate, offering advice on financial issues, the choice of university and doctoral program, and relocation, through the process and timetable of application, interviews, acceptance and rejection, the authors go on to describe their own journeys and the lessons they have learned. These men and women write candidly about their experiences, the strategies they used to maintain their motivation, make the transition from HBCUs to PWIs, balance family and work, make the right choices and keep focussed on priorities. They discuss how to work effectively with advisors and mentors, make all-important connections with teachers and build professional and personal support networks. They recount how they dealt with tokenism, established credibility, handled racism, maintained their values and culture, and persuaded supervisors to legitimize their research interests in African American issues. This is both an inspirational and practical book for every African American considering pursuit of a doctoral degree.

Paper: 978 1 57922 079 2 / $23.95
ADD TO CART

 
The Latina/o Pathway to the Ph.D.
Abriendo Caminos
The Latina/o population constitutes the largest racial and ethnic minority group in the U.S. and is disproportionately under-represented in college and in graduate programs. This is the first book specifically to engage with the absence of Latinas/os in doctoral studies. It proposes educational and administrative strategies to open up the pipeline, and institutional practices to ensure access, support, models and training for Latinas/os aspiring to the Ph.D. The under-education of Latina/o youth begins early. Given that by twelfth grade half will stop out or be pushed out of high school, and only seven percent will complete a college degree, it is not surprising so few enter graduate studies. When Latina/o students do enter higher education, few attend those colleges or universities that are gateways to graduate degrees. Regardless of the type of higher education institution they attend, Latinas/os often encounter social and academic isolation, unaffordable costs, and lack of support. This historic under-representation has created a vicious cycle of limited social and economic mobility. There is a paucity of the Latina/o faculty and leaders whom research shows are essential for changing campus climate and influencing institutions to adapt to the needs of a changing student body. As a result, Latina/o graduate students often have few role models, advocates or mentors, and limited support for their research agendas. By reviewing the pipeline from kindergarten through university, this book provides the needed data and insights to effect change for policy makers, administrators, faculty, and staff; and material for reflection for aspiring Latina/o Ph.D.s on the paths they have taken and the road ahead. The book then addresses the unique experiences and challenges faced by Latina/os in doctoral programs, and offers guidance for students and those responsible for them. Chapters cover issues of gender and generational differences, the role of culture in the graduate school, mentorship, pursuing research, and professional development opportunities for Latina/os. The book closes with the voices of by Latina/o students who are currently pursuing or recently completed their doctoral degree. These narratives describe their cultural and educational journeys, providing insight into their personal and professional experiences. These stories bring alive the graduate experience for anyone interested in successful recruitment, retention, and graduation of Latina/o doctoral students – an inspiration and guidance to those aspiring to the doctorate.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 106 5 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 107 2 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

 
Latinas in the Workplace
An Emerging Leadership Force
Latinas in the Workplace highlights the stories of eight exceptional women. It is the third book in the Journeys to Leadership series that features stories about extraordinary women who have found paths to success in male-dominated arenas. Even though each took a different route to success, these women share an overarching, almost implicit, understanding of what they aspired to: the freedom to choose where and how to invest time and energy, to establish professional and personal balance, and enjoy the luxury of defining that balance. Despite their different professional aspirations, their journeys are rooted in similar ground tilled long before they entered the work world—a strong sense of family, influential religious traditions, and formidable ties to their cultural heritage. The eight Latinas showcased in this book – a foundation president, two business CEOs, a doctor, a former college president, a teacher and author, and two school superintendents – grew up with a determination to get educated that was fostered by parents and grandparents. All of them hold advanced degrees. Engrained in each of them is a sense of honor, the need to treat others with respect, and an inner strength—qualities nurtured by family members. While each had to contend with negative forces, whether from within or outside their culture, and drew strength from the experience, they also acknowledge that being able to navigate two cultures, and being bilingual, has given them a unique perspective and two distinct ways of dealing with people. Although Latinos constitute one of the fastest growing segments of our population, these Latina leaders represent a relatively small percentage of women in leadership in the United States. They hope that their stories inspire not only their contemporaries but the next generation of Latinas as well. The women profiled in this book are: Sarita Brown, President, Excelencia in Education Tina Cordova, President, Queston Construction Sally Garza Fernandez, President, Fernandez Group Carmella Franco, Superintendent, Woodland California School District Christine Johnson, former President, Community College of Denver Thelma López-Lira, M.D. Darline Robles, Executive Officer for the Los Angeles County Office of Education Beatriz Salcedo-Strumpf, Author and Instructor at the State University of New York in Oswego

Cloth: 978 1 57922 352 6 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 353 3 / $23.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 540 7 / $18.99
ADD TO CART

 
The Majority in the Minority
Expanding the Representation of Latina/o Faculty, Administrators and Students in Higher Education
Foreword by Laura I. Rendón
"As a volume destined to be employed by researchers, practitioners and policy makers, "The Majority in the Minority" appears at the right time in our nation’s demographic history. It connects us to the triumphs an tragedies of our Latino collective pasts and leads us to a more hopeful scenario for the future." -- from the Foreword by Laura Rendón Latinas/os are the largest ethnic minority group in the U.S. They are propelling minority communities to majority status in states as disparate as California, Florida, New Jersey, New York and Texas. Their growth in the population at large is not reflected in higher education. In fact Latinos are the least represented population in our colleges and universities, whether as administrators, faculty or students; and as students have one of the highest levels of attrition. Opening access to Latinas/os, assuring their persistence as students in higher education, and their increased presence in college faculty and governance, is of paramount importance if they are to make essential economic gains and fully to participate in and contribute to American society. In this ground-breaking book, twenty-four Latina/o scholars provide an historical background; review issues of student access and achievement, and lessons learned; and present the problems of status and barriers faced by administrators and faculty. The book also includes narratives by graduate students, administrators and faculty that complement the essays and vividly bring these issues to life. This is a book that should be read by policy makers, college administrators, student affairs personnel and faculty concerned about shaping the future of higher education--and constitutes an invaluable resource for all leaders of the Latino community.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 072 3 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 073 0 / $31.50
ADD TO CART

 
Making Global Learning Universal
Promoting Inclusion and Success for All Students
Foreword by Caryn McTighe Musil
While there is wide consensus in higher education that global learning is essential for all students’ success, there are few models of how to achieve this goal. The authors of this book, all of whom are from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse research universities, provide such a model and, in doing so, offer readers a broad definition of global learning that both encompasses a wide variety of modes and experiences—in-person, online, and in co-curricular activities at home and abroad—and engages all students on campus. They provide a replicable set of strategies that embed global learning throughout the curriculum and facilitate high quality, high-impact global learning for all students. The approach this book describes is based upon three principles: that global learning is a process to be experienced, not a thing to be produced; that it requires all students’ participation—particularly the underrepresented—and cannot succeed if reserved for a select few; and that global learning involves more than mastery of a particular body of knowledge. The authors conceptualize global learning as the process of diverse people collaboratively analyzing and addressing complex problems that transcend borders of all kinds. They demonstrate how institutions can enable all students to determine relationships among diverse perspectives on problems and develop equitable, sustainable solutions for the world’s interconnected human and natural communities. What’s more, they describe how a leadership process—collective impact—can enable all stakeholders across departments and disciplines to align and integrate universal global learning throughout the institution and achieve the aims of inclusive excellence. Providing examples of practice, this book: • Offers a model to make global learning universal; • Provides a definition of global learning that incorporates diversity, collaboration, and problem solving as essential components; • Describes effective leadership for implementation consistent with the attributes of global learning; • Illustrates integrative, high-impact global learning strategies within the access pipeline, students’ coursework, and co-curricular activities; • Offers practical strategies for global learning professional development, student learning assessment, and program evaluation; • Promotes inclusive excellence through universal global learning.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 359 1 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 360 7 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 362 1 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Making it on Broken Promises
Edited by Lee Jones
Foreword by Cornel West
"This book provides an occasion to examine the complex conjuncture between the White supremacist realities of the American Academy and the often threatening presence of brilliant Black men in the Academy. This challenging book should also serve as an inspiration for a new generation of Black men deeply devoted to the life of the mind in or outside the Academy." —From the foreward by Cornel West. Sixteen of America's leading scholars offer an uncompromising critique of the academy from their perspective as African American men. They challenge dominant majority assumptions about the culture of higher education, most particularly its claims of openness to diversity and divergent traditions. They take issue with the processes that determine what is legitimized as scholarship, as well as with who wields the power to authenticate it. They describe the debilitating pressures to subordinate Black identity to a supposedly universal but hegemonic Eurocentric culture. They question the academy's valuing of individuality and its privileging of dichotomy over their cultural styles of community, humanism and synthesis. They also range over such issues as culturally mediated styles of cognition, the misuse of standardized testing, the disproportionate burden of service placed on African American faculty and a reward system that discounts it.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 050 1 / $36.00
ADD TO CART

 
Measuring Noncognitive Variables
Improving Admissions, Success and Retention for Underrepresented Students
Foreword by David Kalsbeek
Co-published in association with Big Picture Learning. Measuring Noncognitive Variables: Improving Admissions, Success, and Retention for Underrepresented Students is written for admissions professionals, counselors, faculty and advisers who admit, teach, or work with students during the admissions process and post-enrollment period. It brings together theory, research and practice related to noncognitive variables in a practical way by using assessment methods provided at no cost. Noncognitive variables have been shown to correlate with the academic success of students of all races, cultures, and backgrounds. Noncognitive variables include personal and social dimensions, adjustment, motivation, and student perceptions, rather than the traditional verbal and quantitative areas (often called cognitive) typically measured by standardized tests. Key Features include: * Models that raise concepts related to innovation, diversity and racism in proactive ways * Examples of admission and post-enrollment applications that show how schools and programs can use noncognitive variables in a variety of ways * Additional examples from foundations, professional associations, and K-12 programs * An overview of the limitations of traditional assessment methods such as admission tests, grades, and courses taken Education professionals involved in the admissions process will find this guide effectively informs their practice. This guide is also appropriate as a textbook in a range of courses offered in Higher Education and Student Affairs Masters and PhD programs.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 255 6 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 256 3 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 258 7 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Men of Color in Higher Education
New Foundations for Developing Models for Success
Given the continued plight of men of color in college after a decade of ineffective interventions focused more on “fixing the student” than on addressing the social, structural and institutional forces that undermine his academic achievement, this book is intended as a catalyst to change the direction of the dialogue, by providing a new theoretical framework and strength-based models for developing strategies for success. This book brings together five of today’s leading scholars concerned with the condition of males of color in higher education – LeManuel Bitsóí, Edmund T. Gordon, Shaun Harper, Victor Sáenz and Robert Teranishi, who collaborated closely through of a series of conversations convened by the College Board to diagnose the common factors impeding the success of under-represented males and to identify the particular barriers and cultural issues pertaining to the racial and ethnic groups they examine. This cohesive volume starts with the recognition that understanding males' disengagement from the classroom requires determining what it means to be a male in a non-dominant group in today’s society. The authors use the methods of feminist theory to uncover the impact of dominant paradigms of White, middle-class, heteronormative masculinity on men of color in general, to define what comprises masculinity for various groups, subgroups and individuals, and to lay bare the social and institutional forces that perpetuate constructions of masculinity that negatively impact men of color. They demonstrate that researchers and practitioners alike must pay more careful attention to within-group diversity as they study college men of color and create initiatives that respond to their varied needs. They establish the need for men of color campus initiatives to be mindful of the masculinities with which students enter college, as well as how they develop, negotiate and perform their gender identities on campus; the vital importance, in developing programs and interventions, of addressing the sociological undercurrents of men’s bad behaviors and poor help-seeking tendencies; and for providing opportunities for men to engage in critical individual and collective reflection on how they have been socialized to think of themselves as men. This book advances the critical priorities of increasing enrollments and completion rates among college men of color, and of graduating well-developed men with strong, conflict-free gender identities. For practitioners who work with these populations, it offers insights and signposts to create successful programs; for researchers it offers a set of new directions for analysis; and for policymakers, new ways of thinking about how policy and funding mechanisms ought to be reconsidered to be more effective in responding this issue.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 159 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 160 3 / $33.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 162 7 / $26.99
ADD TO CART

 
The Misrepresented Minority
New Insights on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and the Implications for Higher Education
While Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are growing faster than any other racial group in the U.S., they are all but invisible in higher education, and generally ignored in the research literature, and thus greatly misrepresented and misunderstood. This book presents disaggregated data to unmask important academic achievement and other disparities within the population, and offers new insights that promote more authentic understandings of the realities masked by the designation of AAPI. In offering new perspectives, conceptual frameworks, and empirical research by seasoned and emerging scholars, this book both makes a significant contribution to the emerging knowledge base on AAPIs, and identifies new directions for future scholarship on this population. Its overarching purpose is to provide policymakers, practitioners, and researchers in higher education with the information they need to serve an increasingly important segment of their student populations. In dispelling such misconceptions as that Asian Americans are not really racial minorities, the book opens up the complexity of the racial and ethnic minorities within this group, and identifies the unique challenges that require the attention of anyone in higher education concerned with student access and success, as well as the pipeline to the professoriate.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 351 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 469 1 / $31.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 908 5 / $25.99
ADD TO CART

 
Modeling Mentoring Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender
Practices to Cultivate the Next Generation of Diverse Faculty
While mentorship has been shown to be critical in helping graduate students persist and complete their studies, and enter upon and succeed in their academic careers, the under-representation of faculty of color and women in higher education greatly reduces the opportunities for graduate students from these selfsame groups to find mentors of their race, ethnicity or gender. Recognizing that mentoring across gender, race and ethnicity inserts levels of complexity to this important process, this book both fills a major gap in the literature and provides an in-depth look at successful mentorships between senior white and under-represented scholars and emerging women scholars and scholars of color. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, this book presents chapters written by scholars who share in-depth descriptions of their cross-gender and/or cross-race/ethnicity mentoring relationships. Each article is co-authored by mentors who are established senior scholars and their former protégés with whom they have continuing collegial relationships. Their descriptions provide rich insights into the importance of these relationships, and for developing the academic pipeline for women scholars and scholars of color. Drawing on a comparative analysis of the literature and of the narrative chapters, the editors conclude by identifying the key characteristics and pathways for developing successful mentoring relationships across race, ethnicity or gender, and by offering recommendations for institutional policy and individual mentoring practice. For administrators and faculty concerned about diversity in graduate programs and academic departments, they offer clear models of how to nurture the productive scholars and teachers needed for tomorrow’s demographic of students; for under-represented students, they offer compelling narratives about the rewards and challenges of good mentorship to inform their expectations and the relationships they will develop as protégés.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 487 5 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 488 2 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 570 4 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Multiculturalism on Campus
Theory, Models, and Practices for Understanding Diversity and Creating Inclusion
The first edition of this book constituted a comprehensive resource for students of higher education, faculty, higher education administrators and student affairs leaders engaging with multiculturalism and diverse populations on college campuses. It was one of the first texts to gather in a single volume the related theories, assessment methods, and environmental and application issues pertinent to the study and practice of multiculturalism, while also offering approaches to enhancing multicultural programming and culturally diverse campus environments. This second edition retains the structure and vision of the first, introducing readers to the key theories and models for understanding the complexity of the students they serve, and for reflecting on their own values and motivations. It provides an array of case studies, discussion questions, examples of best practice, and recommendations about resources for use in the classroom. This edition includes a new chapter on intersectionality, updates several chapters, presents a number of new cultural frameworks and updated best practices for creating an inclusive environment for marginalized groups, and expands the third section of the book on cultural competent practice.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 415 4 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 416 1 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 418 5 / $29.99
ADD TO CART

 
The New Talent Acquisition Frontier
Integrating HR and Diversity Strategy in the Private and Public Sectors and Higher Education
Awarded a Silver Medal in the category Human Resources and Employee Training from the 2014 Axiom Business Book Awards • Create the inclusive, high performance workforce needed to succeed in an increasing multicultural society and global marketplace • Learn how global organizations and leading professional associations develop integrated HR/diversity talent strategies, and the specific challenges they face • Get practical tools to assess integrated HR/diversity strategic planning, and see why organizations are not making more diversity progress • Develop specific performance indicators to track your progress in implementing synergistic HR/diversity approaches • Case studies of SHRM, federal and state government, global corporations, and higher education illustrate systematic, integrated HR/diversity efforts For HR professionals and leaders, chief diversity officers, line managers, and executives in the private and public sectors and higher education, this book presents a systematic approach to integrating HR practices and strategic diversity initiatives to create the inclusive, high performance workforce that every enterprise and institution needs to succeed in an increasingly multicultural society and global marketplace. The authors’ point of departure is that talent is the primary strategic asset necessary for organizational survival and success in a demographically diversifying and globally interconnected world. Organizations seeking to attain their full potential in this new talent frontier must optimize their human capital resources by the deliberate development of synergy between human resource (HR) and diversity programs. Failure to integrate and coordinate these two functions will erode organizational competitiveness, whether it is in developing new markets, products, programs, or services. As the first book to provide a concrete roadmap to integrated HR and diversity strategy, the authors identify two critical practices: talent management through the orchestration of HR and diversity programs to enhance organizational capability by unleashing, mobilizing, nurturing, and sustaining the contributions of a diverse and talented workforce; and talent sustainability through the close integration of HR and diversity to continuously develop systems, structures, processes, and a culture that heighten employee commitment, engagement, and inclusion. They further believe that there should be a commonality of practice across all types of organizations, and that each sector can learn from the others to accelerate its adaptation to today’s rapidly shifting national and global realities. Based on the most current research and on interviews with HR and diversity leaders in major organizations, this book provides the reader with concrete strategies and practical tools for implementing a successful and sustainable talent management program. It also addresses common barriers to the development of synergistic HR and diversity strategy, and how to overcome them. Given the evolutionary nature of the integration of HR and diversity, the authors present nine extensive case studies from all organizational sectors, as well as from the two leading Human Resource professional associations – the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR) – to illustrate the dynamic intersection between HR and diversity practices.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 083 5 / $45.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 086 6 / $35.99
ADD TO CART

 
The Nigger in You
Challenging Dysfunctional Language, Engaging Leadership Moments
Embrace Leadership to Combat All Forms of Prejudice Is there a “nigger” in you? If you have attempted to avoid and/or escape oppression, been made to feel as if you are a problem, been treated as “lesser than” or even like a criminal, all just because you are different in a given context, then what Dr. J. W. Wiley asserts through the title of this book inescapably applies to you. Through any of our multiple identities—stereotyped, marginalized, or ostracized by our socio-economic class, level of education, gender, disability, age, race, sexual orientation, or religion—we are all potential victims as well as perpetrators of denigrating language and discrimination. Dr. Wiley borrows the agency of nigger, arguably the quintessential, most universally known term of disparagement of those negatively considered the Other, to re-frame the word as no longer just a racial term but one that symbolizes many of the ways we disrespect or bully one another, are inconsiderate of one another, prejudge one another, and internalize our demonization. He defines the word in a way that demonstrates its equivalence to other dysfunctional language (retard, bitch, fag, trailer trash, etc.) that suggests that those so targeted are unworthy of consideration in our society. By creating a conversation around such language, Dr. Wiley challenges us to recognize that, when we give in to our prejudices and stereotypes, the “nigger in you” is what we are apt to see when we encounter those different from ourselves. The author, who is Director of the Center for Diversity, Pluralism, and Inclusion for the State University of New York–Plattsburg, a Lecturer in Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies, and president of his own consulting business, engages diversity in a uniquely inclusive way and as inseparable from social justice. By dissecting the offensive language we often use, consciously or unconsciously, Dr. Wiley provokes us to recognize that, since every one of us has multiple identities beyond just the color of our skin, it is virtually impossible for most of us not to have felt the sting of oppression, or the power of privilege that some of those same multiple identities may confer on us. Consequently, it is morally incumbent on us to contest and ultimately transcend oppression wherever we encounter it, to respect the humanity of those different from us, and become allies in the war to protect and advance people’s right to be different. Through personal stories, scholarship, poetry, commentary on current affairs, lyrics, and his experiences as a Black man both rooted in African American culture and the culture of the academy who daily has to navigate and negotiate multiple worlds, Dr. Wiley leads us on a journey toward social justice. In doing so, he empowers us—in whatever sphere, private or public, in which we have some agency—to embrace our leadership moments by engaging those who would perpetrate dysfunctional language or behavior, and help create a world in which differences are respected and validated.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 985 6 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 986 3 / $22.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 988 7 / $17.99
ADD TO CART

 
One with the Community
Indicators of Engagement at Minority-Serving Institutions
Based on the findings of a multi-year research project, this volume profiles successful community engagement practices at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs), and tribal colleges. Engagement levels at these institutions outstrip levels seen elsewhere on nearly every measure; the innovative ways these institutions put engagement into practice offer models for all of higher education. In addition to examining organizational structures, curricular approaches, institutional culture, and partnering strategies that support local communities, the book offers a comprehensive self-assessment tool to help campuses evaluate and deepen their own engagement practices. This book is the second volume produced as part of Campus Compacts Indicators of Engagement Project; the first is The Community's College: Indicators of Engagement at Two-Year Institutions.

Paper: 978 0 9729394 4 7 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Open Mic Night
Campus Programs that Champion College Student Voice and Engagement
While campuses across the United States have been offering spoken word programs for over 20 years, little attention has been paid to their purpose and impact beyond their contribution to the campus social aesthetic. There is an increasing understanding that performance poetry and spoken word is much more than entertainment. Within disciplines such as English, Ethnic, Women’s, and Cultural Studies, scholarship has identified spoken word’s role in developing political agency among young adults; its utility for promoting authentic youth voice; and its importance as a tool of cultural engagement. This book – compiled by scholar artists, including internationally recognized spoken word performers – offers guidance to student affairs professionals on using spoken word as a tool for college student engagement, activism, and civic awareness. It makes the case that campus event spaces need to transcend their association with the theatre or art departments to provide a venue where students are allowed to be different and find opportunities for personal and intellectual development and civic engagement. Open mic nights offer college students a way to speak out, advocate, lead, educate, and explore with their peers. This book presents a mix of critical essays and college student writing that explore themes of spoken word, student engagement, and campus inclusion and address these key topics: • Spoken word as an educational, civic engagement, and personal development tool (particularly among traditionally marginalized communities) • The links between spoken word and social activism (art as social action; art as a form of civic leadership) • The importance of privileging student voice in student affairs programming (even when they yell; even when they’re angry) • The challenges that come with engaging students in exploring intersecting concepts like race, gender, and class • Considerations for creative and intentional spoken word programming (What does a creative program look like?) • Scaling up for sustainability (through student affairs/academic affairs partnerships, study abroad collaborations, etc.)

Cloth: 978 1 62036 512 0 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 513 7 / $27.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 515 1 / $21.99
ADD TO CART

 
Overcoming Educational Racism in the Community College
Creating Pathways to Success for Minority and Impoverished Student Populations
Edited by Angela Long
Foreword by Walter G. Bumphus
Overall, nearly half of all incoming community college students “drop-out” within twelve months of enrolling, with students of color and the economically disadvantaged faring far worse. Given the high proportion of underserved students these colleges enroll, the detrimental impact on their communities, and for the national economy as a whole at a time of diversifying demographics, is enormous. This book addresses this urgent issue by bringing together nationally recognized researchers whose work throws light on the structural and systemic causes of student attrition, as well as college presidents and leaders who have successfully implemented strategies to improve student outcomes. The book is divided into five sections, each devoted to a demographic group: African Americans, Native Americans/American Indians, Latino Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Caucasian students in poverty. Each section in turn comprises three chapters, the first providing an up-to-date summary of research findings about barriers and attainments pertaining to the corresponding population, the second the views of a community college president, and the final chapter offering a range of models and best practices for achieving student success. The analyses--descriptions of cutting edge programs--and recommendations for action will commend this volume to everyone concerned about equity and completion rates in the community college sector, from presidents and senior administrators through faculty and student affairs leaders. For educational researchers, it fills blanks on data about attrition and persistence patterns of minority students attending community colleges. Contributors Kenneth Atwater Glennda M. Bivens Edward Bush Cara Crowley Maria Harper-Marinick Joan B. Holmes G. Edward Hughes Lee Lambert Cynthia Lindquist, Ta’Sunka Wicahpi Win (Star Horse Woman) Angela Long Russell Lowery-Hart Jamillah Moore Christopher M. Mullin Brian Murphy Eduardo J. Padrón Deborah A. Santiago Wei Song Robert Teranishi Rowena M. Tomaneng James Utterback J. Luke Wood

Cloth: 978 1 62036 347 8 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 348 5 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 350 8 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Pathways to Higher Education Administration for African American Women
For Black women faculty members and student affairs personnel, this book delineates the needed skills and the range of possible pathways for attaining administrative positions in higher education. This book uses a survey that identifies the skills and knowledge that Black women administrators report as most critical at different stages of their careers as a foundation for the personal narratives of individual administrators’ career progressions. The contributors address barriers, strategies, and considerations such as the comparative merits of starting a career at an HBCU or PWI, or at a public or private institution. Their stories shine light on how to develop the most effective leadership style, how to communicate, and the importance of leading with credibility. They dwell on the necessity of listening to one’s inner voice in guiding decisions, of maintaining integrity and having a clear sense of values, and of developing a realistic sense of personal limitations and abilities. They illustrate how to combine institutional and personal priorities with service to the community; share how the authors carved out their distinct and purposeful career paths; and demonstrate the importance of the mentoring they received and provided along the way. A theoretical chapter provides a frame for reflecting on the paths traveled. These accounts and reflections provide enlightenment, inspiration, and nuggets of wisdom for all Black women who want to advance their careers in higher education.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 249 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 250 5 / $26.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 833 0 / $20.99
ADD TO CART

 
Promoting Inclusion in Education Abroad
A Handbook of Research and Practice
Foreword by Esther Brimmer
While education abroad – including studying, volunteering, researching, and interning abroad – is increasingly emphasized as a critical factor in preparing undergraduates for a globally interconnected world, diversifying the pool of participants in such activities has proven challenging. Framed within the concept of “inclusive excellence” with the objective of promoting diversity, inclusion, and equity in higher education as foundational to educational excellence, the contributors present research and practices that have been proven successful in improving participation among groups of students traditionally underrepresented in education abroad. Broader participation in education abroad programming has been a perennial concern at numerous higher education institutions in the U.S., having prompted countless discussions in professional organizations and across campuses among faculty, staff, and students. Many have come to recognize that overseas opportunities are no longer a luxury and instead are a necessity for job seekers entering a more diverse, globally interconnected workplace. The volume offers a combination of research-based chapters and case studies from leading experts on the barriers that disproportionately impact specific groups of students, including: students with disabilities; first-generation college students; undocumented students; racial and ethnic minorities; science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors; and males. The authors illuminate the issues which may inhibit education abroad participation, from individual to institutional, and present strategies reflecting a broad range of institutional contexts, resources, and needs. While there has been significant discussion and action to promote broader inclusion in education abroad, this is the first volume focusing on research and practice to achieve these ends, and is intended as a critical resource for practitioners and scholars alike.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 555 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 556 4 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 558 8 / $25.99
ADD TO CART

 
Race, Equity, and the Learning Environment
The Global Relevance of Critical and Inclusive Pedagogies in Higher Education
Foreword by Lori D. Patton
At a time of impending demographic shifts, faculty and administrators in higher education around the world are becoming aware of the need to address the systemic practices and barriers that contribute to inequitable educational outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse students. Focusing on the higher education learning environment, this volume illuminates the global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies (CIP), and demonstrates how their application can transform the teaching and learning process and promote more equitable educational outcomes among all students, but especially racially minoritized students. The examples in this book illustrate the importance of recognizing the detrimental impact of dominant ideologies, of evaluating who is being included in and excluded from the learning process, and paying attention to when teaching fails to consider students’ varying social, psychological, physical and/or emotional needs. This edited volume brings CIP into the realm of comparative education by gathering scholars from across academic disciplines and countries to explore how these pedagogies not only promote deep learning among students, but also better equip instructors to attend to the needs of diverse students by prioritizing their intellectual and social development; creating identity affirming learning environments that foster high expectations; recognizing the value of the cultural and national differences that learners bring to the educational experience; and engaging the “whole” student in the teaching and learning process.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 339 3 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 340 9 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 342 3 / $25.99
ADD TO CART

 
Race, Poverty, and Social Justice
Multidisciplinary Perspectives Through Service Learning
Series Edited by Gerald S. Eisman
Foreword by Robert A. Corrigan
This volume explores multiple examples of how to connect classrooms to communities through service learning and participatory research to teach issues of social justice. The various chapters provide examples of how collaborations between students, faculty, and community partners are creating models of democratic spaces (on campus and off campus) where the students are teachers and the teachers are students. The purpose of this volume is to provide examples of how service learning can be integrated into courses addressing social justice issues. At the same time, it is about demonstrating the power of service learning in advancing a course content that is community-based and socially engaged. To stimulate the adaptation of the approaches described in these books, each volume includes an Activity / Methodology table that summarizes key elements of each example, such as class size, pedagogy, and other disciplinary applications. Click here for the table to this title.

Paper: 978 1 57922 220 8 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

 
Real-Time Student Assessment
Meeting the Imperative for Improved Time to Degree, Closing the Opportunity Gap, and Assuring Student Competencies for 21st-Century Needs
Foreword by George D. Kuh
This book challenges institutions and their programs to prioritize the use of chronological assessment results to benefit enrolled students in comparison with the more common practice of prolonged assessment cycles that generally benefit future students. Peggy Maki advocates for real-time assessment processes to identify patterns of underperformance and obstacles that require timely interventions for enrolled students to succeed. In tandem with the sets of educational practices and policies that many institutions have now undertaken to close achievement and graduation rates across our diverse student demographics, such as developing clear degree pathways, she calls on all higher education providers – if they are to remain relevant and meet their social purpose in our complex world – to urgently recalibrate their assessment processes to focus on currently enrolled students’ progress towards achieving a high-quality degree, regardless of when they matriculate or re-enter higher education. She demonstrates that we already have sufficient examples and evidence to implement real-time assessment of students as they progress through their studies. She draws on the practices of specialized accredited programs, such as those in the professions that assess in real time; on the experiences of institutions that have adopted competency-based education; and on the affordances of technologies that now provide faculty and students with up-to-the-minute diagnostics. She identifies the six principles necessary to implement a real-time assessment process, illustrated by case studies of how campuses have operationalized them to advance students’ equitable progress towards achieving a high-quality degree; and demonstrates the benefits of real-time assessment compared to more future-oriented processes, among which is engaging students in reflecting on their own progress along their degree pathways. She advocates for the use of well documented national outcomes-based frameworks such as Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP), its aligned Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education scoring rubrics ( VALUE), the Degree Qualifications Profile, and discipline-based outcomes assessments to ensure high-quality degrees that meet well-defined standards and criteria. She also identifies how data systems and technological developments help to monitor closely and respond in time to students’ patterns of underperformance. The book is an urgent call for higher education to achieve the values of equity, transparency and quality it espouses; and ensure that all students graduate in a timely fashion with the competencies they need to be active and productive citizens.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 487 1 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 488 8 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 490 1 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Realizing Bakke's Legacy
Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity, and Access to Higher Education
• How has Bakke shaped our understanding of race, access to education, and affirmative action? • Will Bakke remain relevant for the future, legally and politically? • Can we use Bakke to re-envision affirmative action in higher education? Published to mark the 30th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Bakke decision, this book explores the complex set of legal and educational policy circumstances established by this historic court decision that continues to simultaneously frame, narrow, and confound our understanding of affirmative action in higher education specifically, and issues of equity in education broadly. By “upholding Bakke,” the Supreme Court, in its Gratz and Grutter opinions, maintained its centrality in the on-going argument about access to higher education. However, this validation of racial and ethnic diversity as a legally compelling interest did not silence the multiplicity of voices debating the consequences and fundamental issues of Bakke. Multi-disciplinary in approach and multi-racial in content, this book represents that kaleidoscope of voices and opinions. The contributors include scholars of national stature in the areas of access and equity in education. The book is guided by three frames: Bakke's legal and philosophical lineage; the educational pipeline -- past, present, and future; and policy and practice. It begins with an historical analysis of the legal and policy parameters of the decision and highlights the legal and social fissures that exist related to affirmative action and college admissions. It discusses in detail the philosophical underpinnings of affirmative action as a catalyst for reaping the benefits of diversity. The book also reviews Bakke's broader influences on K-12 and postsecondary politics, and practices across institutional, state, and national levels. As racial divisions in the country are sharpening and as educational outcomes continue to be directly related to race and poverty, this volume will help inform the discussions and decisions by federal and state policy-makers, educational providers, civil rights advocates and other interested stakeholders to bring about the changes that lead to equal opportunity.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 267 3 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 268 0 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

 
Retaining African Americans in Higher Education
Challenging Paradigms for Retaining Students, Faculty and Administrators
Edited by Lee Jones
Retention of African Americans on campus is a burning issue for the black community, and a moral and financial one for predominantly white institutions of higher education. This book offers fresh insights and new strategies developed by fifteen scholars concerned by the new climate in which affirmative action is being challenged and eliminated. This is the first book devoted specifically to retention of African Americans in higher education, and is unique in addressing the distinct but inter-related concerns of all three affected constituencies: students, faculty and administrators. Each is considered in a separate section. The student section shifts attention from, to paraphrase McNairy, "fixing the student" to focussing on higher education's need to examine and, where appropriate, revise policies, curriculum, support services and campus climate. Responding to the new agenda shaped by the opponents of affirmative action, but rejecting the defensive "x percent solutions" espoused by its proponents, this book puts forward new solutions that will provoke debate. Section II begins with a survey of the literature on African American administrators, and presents a Delphi study of twelve administrators to provide an understanding of pathways and barriers to success. The contributors then consider the importance of developing community support and creating alliances, the role of mentoring, and the setting of clear expectations between the individual and the institution. Starting with the recognition that African Americans represent less than five percent of full-time faculty, the chapters in the final section examine the effects of the dismantling of affirmative action, the consequences of faculty salaries trailing more lucrative non-academic employment, the declining enrollment of students of color, the politics of promotion and tenure, and issues of identity and culture. The book concludes by stressing the roles that parents, faculty and administrators must play to empower African American students to take responsibility for their own academic performance. This is a compelling, controversial and constructive contribution to an issue of national importance.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 041 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 042 6 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

 
Sentipensante (Sensing/Thinking) Pedagogy
Educating for Wholeness, Social Justice and Liberation
Foreword by Mark Nepo
* An inspirational and holistic approach to teaching by a renowned Latina scholar * Defines seven steps to unlocking the potential of teachers and their students * Deeply informed by the author's educational journey as a minority woman from a background of rural poverty Laura Rendón is a scholar of national stature, known for her research on students of color and first-generation college students, and on the factors that promote and impede student success. The motivation for the quest that Laura Rendón shares in this book was the realization that she, along with many educators, had lost sight of the deeper, relationship-centered essence of education, and lost touch with the fine balance between educating for academics and educating for life. Her purpose is to reconnect readers with the original impulse that led them to become educators; and to help them rediscover, with her, their passion for teaching and learning in the service of others and for the well being of our society. She offers a transformative vision of education that emphasizes the harmonic, complementary relationship between the sentir of intuition and the inner life and the pensar of intellectualism and the pursuit of scholarship; between teaching and learning; formal knowledge and wisdom; and between Western and non-Western ways of knowing. In the process she develops a pedagogy that encompasses wholeness, multiculturalism, and contemplative practice, that helps students transcend limiting views about themselves; fosters high expectations, and helps students to become social change agents. She invites the reader to share her journey in developing sentipensante pedagogy, and to challenge seven entrenched agreements about education that act against wholeness and the appreciation of truth in all forms. She offers examples of her own teaching and of the classroom practices of faculty she encountered along the way; as well as guidance on the challenges, rewards and responsibilities that anyone embarking on creating a new vision of teaching and learning should attend to. Though based on the author’s life work in higher education, her insights and approach apply equally to all teaching and learning contexts.

Paper: 978 1 57922 984 9 / $23.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 853 8 / $18.99
ADD TO CART

 
Sisters of the Academy
Emergent Black Women Scholars in Higher Education
There are disturbing trends in the continued under-representation of African American women in higher education, especially their attainment of post-baccalaureate and graduate degrees. This is an issue of major concern nationally, for the Black community, and for leaders in higher education. The fifteen scholars who contribute to this volume trace the trajectory of Black women in education, with a particular focus on higher education. These scholars combine research and personal narratives to explore educational issues ranging from historical accounts of Black female teachers in the nineteenth century, to the challenges and triumphs of being an activist researcher at the turn of the twenty-first century. The essays in this volume address specific historical, social, cultural, political, and academic issues that affect Black women in the academy, and provide readers with tangible examples of how these scholars have transcended some of the challenges in their pursuit of academic excellence. While these essays do not claim to provide the "magic solution" or a "how-to-guide" to success in higher education, they do raise thought-provoking issues that are critical to the success of Black women in higher education. This book uncovers issues, and proposes remedies, which will be of vital interest for anyone concerned with diversity and equity in higher education. It celebrates emergent scholars of African descent, who have used the challenges they have encountered in their journeys through the academy to create opportunities for success.

Paper: 978 1 57922 039 6 / $32.50
ADD TO CART

 
"Strangers" of the Academy
Asian Women Scholars in Higher Education
No less than other minorities, Asian women scholars are confronted with racial discrimination and stereotyping as well as disrespect for their research, teaching, and leadership, and are underrepresented in academia. In the face of such barriers, many Asian female scholars have developed strategies to survive and thrive. This book is among the first to examine their lived experience in Western academic discourses. It addresses the socio-cultural, political, academic, and personal issues that Asian female scholars encounter in higher education. The contributors to this book include first- and second-generation immigrants who are teachers and researchers in higher education and who come from a wide range of Asian nations and backgrounds. They here combine new research and personal narratives to explore the intersecting layers of relationships that impact their lives—language, culture, academic discourses, gender, class, generation, and race. The book is replete with the richness and complexity of these scholars’ struggles and triumphs in their professional and personal realms. This powerful and engaging volume: * Examines and celebrates the struggles and triumphs that Asian female scholars experience as they try to “make it” in academic environments that may differ sharply from the culture of their countries of origin; * Highlights the unique contributions the authors have made to research, theory, and the profession; * Establishes the authors’ claim to visibility and a voice for themselves and more generally for Asian women in the academy; * Opens a dialogue on these critical issues by sharing the academic and personal experiences of senior and junior scholars alike; and * Contributes to the on-going discussion on issues pertinent to the status of minority female scholars in higher education.

Paper: 978 1 57922 121 8 / $37.50
ADD TO CART

 
Strategic Diversity Leadership
Activating Change and Transformation in Higher Education
In today’s world – whether viewed through a lens of educational attainment, economic development, global competitiveness, leadership capacity, or social justice and equity – diversity is not just the right thing to do, it is the only thing to do! Following the era of civil rights in the 1960s and ‘70s, the 1990s and early 21st century have seen both retrenchment and backlash years, but also a growing recognition, particularly in business and the military, that we have to educate and develop the capacities of our citizens from all levels of society and all demographic and social groups to live fulfilling lives in an inter-connected globe. For higher education that means not only increasing the numbers of diverse students, faculty, and staff, but simultaneously pursuing excellence in student learning and development, as well as through research and scholarship – in other words pursuing what this book defines as strategic diversity leadership. The aim is to create systems that enable every student, faculty, and staff member to thrive and achieve to maximum potential within a diversity framework. This book is written from the perspective that diversity work is best approached as an intellectual endeavor with a pragmatic focus on achieving results that takes an evidence-based approach to operationalizing diversity. It offers an overarching conceptual framework for pursuing diversity in a national and international context; delineates and describes the competencies, knowledge and skills needed to take effective leadership in matters of diversity; offers new data about related practices in higher education; and presents and evaluates a range of strategies, organizational structures and models drawn from institutions of all types and sizes. It covers such issues as the reorganization of the existing diversity infrastructure, building accountability systems, assessing the diversity process, and addressing legal threats to implementation. Its purpose is to help strategic diversity leaders combine big-picture thinking with an on-the-ground understanding of organizational reality and work strategically with key stakeholders and allies. This book is intended for presidents, provosts, chief diversity officers or diversity professionals, and anyone who wants to champion diversity and embed its objectives on his or her campus, whether at the level of senior administration, as members of campus organizations or committees, or as faculty, student affairs professionals or students taking a leadership role in making and studying the process of change. This title is also available in a set with its companion volume, The Chief Diversity Officer.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 819 4 / $49.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 822 4 / $39.99
ADD TO CART

 
Successful STEM Mentoring Initiatives for Underrepresented Students
A Research-Based Guide for Faculty and Administrators
Successful STEM Mentoring Initiatives for Underrepresented College Students is a step-by-step, research-based guide for higher education faculty and administrators who are charged with designing mentoring programs to recruit and retain students from underrepresented groups. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field of STEM mentoring, the book constitutes a virtual consultant that enables readers to diagnose the issues they face, identify priorities, and implement appropriate practices to achieve their goals. The book describes the real and perceived barriers that underrepresented students—to include women, students of color, transfer students, and first-generation college students—encounter when considering enrollment, or participating, in science courses; considers the issues they face at the various transitions in their education, from entering college to declaring a major and moving on to a profession; and sets out the range of mentoring options available to program designers. By posing key questions and using three running case illustrations of common dilemmas, the book walks readers through the process of matching the best design options with the particular needs and resources of their own department or campus. Intentionally brief and to the point, the book is nonetheless a comprehensive guide to the full range mentoring models and best practices, that also covers issues of institutional and departmental climate and teaching methods, and offers insider insights to help designers avoid pitfalls as they create effective, sustainable mentoring initiatives. This guide will assist administrators working on new initiatives to broaden access and improve persistence and graduation in their programs, as well as apply for research grants, by clarifying objectives and identifying the effective evidence-based practices to achieve them. It also provides common conversation-starters for departments to identify obstacles to enrollment and broaden participation.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 295 2 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 296 9 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 298 3 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Talking About Race
Alleviating the Fear
Foreword by William Ayers
What is it that gives many of us White people a visceral fear about discussing race? Do you realize that being able to not think about or talk about it is a uniquely White experience? Do you warn your children about how people might react to them; find store staff following or watching you; get stopped by the police for no reason? The students of color in your classroom experience discrimination every day, in small and large ways. They don’t often see themselves represented in their textbooks, and encounter hostility in school, and outside. For them race is a constant reality, and an issue they need, and want, to discuss. Failure to do so can inhibit their academic performance. Failure to discuss race prevents White students from getting a real, critical and deep understanding of our society and their place in it. It is essential for the well-being of all students that they learn to have constructive conversations about the history of race in this country, the impact of racism on different ethnic communities, and how those communities and cultures contribute to society. The need to model for our students how to talk openly and comfortably about race is critical in America today, but it is still an issue that is difficult to tackle. To overcome the common fear of discussing race, of saying “something wrong”, this book brings together over thirty contributions by teachers and students of different ethnicities and races who offer their experiences, ideas, and advice. With passion and sensitivity they: cover such topics as the development of racial consciousness and identity in children; admit their failures and continuing struggles; write about creating safe spaces and the climate that promotes thoughtful discussion; model self-reflection; demonstrate the importance of giving voice to students; recount how they responded to racial incidents and used current affairs to discuss oppression; describe courses and strategies they have developed; explain the “n” word; present exercises; and pose questions. For any teacher grappling with addressing race in the classroom, and for pre-service teachers confronting their anxieties about race, this book offers a rich resource of insights, approaches and guidance that will allay fears, and provide the reflective practitioner with the confidence to initiate and respond to discussion of race, from the pre-school and elementary classroom through high school.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 559 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 560 5 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 562 9 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Teaching Across Cultural Strengths
A Guide to Balancing Integrated and Individuated Cultural Frameworks in College Teaching
Foreword by Joseph L. White
Co-published in association with Promoting learning among college students is an elusive challenge, and all the more so when faculty and students come from differing cultures. This comprehensive guide addresses the continuing gaps in our knowledge about the role of culture in learning; and offers an empirically-based framework and model, together with practical strategies, to assist faculty in transforming college teaching for all their students through an understanding of and teaching to their strengths. Recognizing that each student learns in culturally influenced ways, and that each instructor’s teaching is equally influenced by her or his background and experiences, the authors offer an approach by which teachers can progressively learn about culture while they transform their teaching through reflection and the application of new practices that enrich student learning. The key premise of the book is that deepening student learning and increasing retention and graduation rates requires teaching from a strengths based perspective that recognizes the cultural assets that students bring to higher education, and to their own learning. Derived through research and practice, the authors present their Model of Cultural Frameworks in College Teaching and Learning that highlights eight continua towards achieving the transformation of teaching, and developing more culturally balanced and inclusive practices, over time. They present techniques – illustrated by numerous examples and narratives – for building on cultural strengths in teaching; offer tips and strategies for teaching through cultural dilemmas; and provide culturally reflective exercises. This guide is intended for all faculty, faculty developers or administrators in higher education concerned with equitable outcomes in higher education and with ensuring that all student cultural groups learn and graduate at the same rates.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 323 2 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 324 9 / $29.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 326 3 / $23.99
ADD TO CART

 
Teaching Interculturally
A Framework for Integrating Disciplinary Knowledge and Intercultural Development
Foreword by Peter Felten
How can I simultaneously support students' critical engagement with course content and develop their intercultural awareness? Most faculty have multiple diversities present in any given classroom or academic program— whether from an influx of international students or an increase of students from low-income, first generation, and/or racial/ethnic minority populations— and are concerned about how to maintain a rigorous curriculum and ensure that all their students succeed, given disparate backgrounds and varying degrees of prior knowledge. This book provides faculty and instructors with a theoretical foundation, practical tools, and an iterative and reflective process for designing and implementing an intercultural pedagogy. The authors bring to bear the expertise of their various disciplinary backgrounds to offer a responsive, integrative framework to develop and continually refine a pedagogy that both promotes deep disciplinary learning and supports intercultural outcomes for all students. The authors offer a framework that is flexible enough to be responsive to the experience, environment, and particulars of a given teaching and learning situation. The text incorporates narrative text by the authors, as well as first-person reflections, classroom activities, and annotated assignments that illustrate the dynamic process of intention, experiment/implement, critique, and refinement that characterize pedagogy and intercultural interaction. The authors bring to bear the expertise of their various disciplinary backgrounds, a deep knowledge of effective pedagogical practice, and their experience and grounding in intercultural practice: Amy in composition/writing studies, Mary Katherine in international education with rich experience as a faculty development trainer, and Bob and Catherine, respectively, an historian and a family scientist. This book is intended both for individual reading as well as for collective study in learning communities.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 379 9 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 380 5 / $27.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 382 9 / $21.99
ADD TO CART

 
Trans* in College
Transgender Students' Strategies for Navigating Campus Life and the Institutional Politics of Inclusion
Foreword by Kristen A. Renn
Afterword by Stephen John Quaye
WINNER of 2017 AERA DIVISION J OUTSTANDING PUBLICATION AWARD This is both a personal book that offers an account of the author’s own trans* identity and a deeply engaged study of trans* collegians that reveals the complexities of trans* identities, and how these students navigate the trans* oppression present throughout society and their institutions, create community and resilience, and establish meaning and control in a world that assumes binary genders. This book is addressed as much to trans* students themselves – offering them a frame to understand the genders that mark them as different and to address the feelings brought on by the weight of that difference – as it is to faculty, student affairs professionals, and college administrators, opening up the implications for the classroom and the wider campus. This book not only remedies the paucity of literature on trans* college students, but does so from a perspective of resiliency and agency. Rather than situating trans* students as problems requiring accommodation, this book problematizes the college environment and frames trans* students as resilient individuals capable of participating in supportive communities and kinship networks, and of developing strategies to promote their own success. Z Nicolazzo provides the reader with a nuanced and illuminating review of the literature on gender and sexuality that sheds light on the multiplicity of potential expressions and outward representations of trans* identity as a prelude to the ethnography ze conducted with nine trans* collegians that richly documents their interactions with, and responses to, environments ranging from the unwittingly offensive to explicitly antagonistic. The book concludes by giving space to the study’s participants to themselves share what they want college faculty, staff, and students to know about their lived experiences. Two appendices respectively provide a glossary of vocabulary and terms to address commonly asked questions, and a description of the study design, offered as guide for others considering working alongside marginalized population in a manner that foregrounds ethics, care, and reciprocity.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 455 0 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 456 7 / $24.95
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 458 1 / $19.99
ADD TO CART

 
Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education
Demography, Democracy, and Discourse
Foreword by Phillip Bowman
This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”? A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected in research and practice. The chapters trace how the discourse on diversity is newly shaped after many of the 20th century concepts of race, ethnicity, gender and class have lost authority. In the academic disciplines and in public discourse, perspectives about diversity have been rapidly shifting in recent years. This is especially true in the United States where demographic changes and political attitudes have prompted new observations—some which will clash with traditional frameworks. This text brings together scholars whose research has opened up new ways to understand the complexities of diversity in higher education. Because the essential topic under consideration is changing so quickly, the editors of this volume also have asked the contributors to reflect on the paths their own scholarship has taken in their careers, and to see how they would relate their current conceptualization of diversity to one or more of three identified themes (demography, democracy and discourse). Each chapter ends with a candid graduate student interview of the author that provides an engaged picture of how the authors wrestle with one of the most complicated topics shaping them (and all of us) as individuals and as scholars. Of interest to anyone who is following the debates about diversity issues on our campuses, the book also offers a wonderful introduction to graduate students entering a discipline where critically important ideas are still very much alive for discussion.

Cloth: 978 1 62036 375 1 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 62036 376 8 / $35.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 62036 378 2 / $27.99
ADD TO CART

 
Using Action Inquiry in Engaged Research
An Organizing Guide
Foreword by Timothy K. Eatman
Afterword by Rick Dalton
Using Action Inquiry in Engaged Research: An Organizing Guide offers higher education and school professionals practical guidance and methods for using the Action Inquiry Model (AIM) in engaged research initiatives and community partnerships. Replete with group exercises and case studies, this guide was originally developed to supplement workshops for faculty, administrators and students working on action initiatives that focused on critical educational issues facing local communities. It provides a useful framework and straightforward techniques for building empowering partnerships. The Action Inquiry Model (AIM) includes four stages: • Assessment: Using research and experience to identify critical challenges facing the university with respect to the improvement of educational opportunities • Organization: Developing workgroups to collaborate on initiatives that address critical challenges; providing financial support for new initiatives; and providing release time and professional development opportunities for faculty and staff who engage in reform initiatives • Action Initiatives: Treating reforms as pilot tests for new strategies, as a means of promoting organizational learning, professional development, and student success • Evaluation: Integrating the evaluation of current programs and incorporating new initiatives into the reform process. This guide provides two methods for learning the inquiry process: a step-by-step process for defining tasks for teams of researchers and practitioners working together to use research to inform the educational improvement; and sets of case studies on assessment and action inquiry to inform groups in collectively discussing problems and strategies, an approach that supports the classroom use of the Guide. The key tasks in action inquiry initiatives include: 1. Build an understanding of the challenge 2 Identify the causes of the challenge using data to test hypotheses 2. Look internally and externally for solutions 3. Assess possible solutions 4. Develop action plans 5. Implement pilot test, and evaluate This guide is appropriate for professional development programs and as a text for higher education Masters and Ph.D. programs.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 834 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 835 4 / $25.00
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 837 8 / $19.99
ADD TO CART

 
We ARE Americans
Undocumented Students Pursuing the American Dream
Foreword by Daniel G. Solorzano
Winner of the CEP Mildred Garcia Award for Exemplary Scholarship About 2.4 million children and young adults under 24 years of age are undocumented. Brought by their parents to the US as minors—many before they had reached their teens—they account for about one-sixth of the total undocumented population. Illegal through no fault of their own, some 65,000 undocumented students graduate from the nation's high schools each year. They cannot get a legal job, and face enormous barriers trying to enter college to better themselves—and yet America is the only country they know and, for many, English is the only language they speak. What future do they have? Why are we not capitalizing, as a nation, on this pool of talent that has so much to contribute? What should we be doing? Through the inspiring stories of 16 students—from seniors in high school to graduate students—William Perez gives voice to the estimated 2.4 million undocumented students in the United States, and draws attention to their plight. These stories reveal how—despite financial hardship, the unpredictability of living with the daily threat of deportation, restrictions of all sorts, and often in the face of discrimination by their teachers—so many are not just persisting in the American educational system, but achieving academically, and moreover often participating in service to their local communities. Perez reveals what drives these young people, and the visions they have for contributing to the country they call home. Through these stories, this book draws attention to these students’ predicament, to stimulate the debate about putting right a wrong not of their making, and to motivate more people to call for legislation, like the stalled Dream Act, that would offer undocumented students who participate in the economy and civil life a path to citizenship. Perez goes beyond this to discuss the social and policy issues of immigration reform. He dispels myths about illegal immigrants’ supposed drain on state and federal resources, providing authoritative evidence to the contrary. He cogently makes the case—on economic, social, and constitutional and moral grounds—for more flexible policies towards undocumented immigrants. If today’s immigrants, like those of past generations, are a positive force for our society, how much truer is that where undocumented students are concerned?

Cloth: 978 1 57922 375 5 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 376 2 / $26.00
ADD TO CART

 
What Makes Racial Diversity Work in Higher Education
Academic Leaders Present Successful Policies and Strategies
Foreword by William E. Kirwan
* A unique reference describing successful diversity initiatives in higher education Higher education, like the nation, is facing major demographic changes. Our colleges and universities recognize they not only have to be more inclusive, but that they have to provide an environment that will effectively retain and develop the growing population of ethnically and racially diverse students. How ready are they and what should they be doing? Frank W. Hale, Jr. -- known as the "Dean of Diversity" for his pioneering efforts in establishing Ohio State as one of the institutions graduating the most Black Ph.D.s -- has gathered twenty-two leading scholars and administrators from around the country who describe the successful diversity programs they have developed. Recognizing the importance of diversity as a means of embracing the experiences, perspectives and expertise of other cultures, this book shares what has been most effective in helping institutions to create an atmosphere and a campus culture that not only admits students, faculty and staff of color but accepts and welcomes their presence and participation. This is a landmark reference for every institution concerned with inclusivity and diversity. The successes it presents offers academic leaders much they can learn from, and ideas and procedures they can adapt, as they discuss and develop their own campus policies and initiatives. Contributors: Samuel Betances Donald Brown Carlos E. Cortés Myra Gordon Linda S. Greene Frank W. Hale, Jr. Margaret N. Harrigan William B. Harvey Freeman A. Hrabowski, III Lee Jones William “Brit” Kirwan Paul Kivel Antoinette Miranda JoAnn Moody Leslie N. Pollard Neil L. Rudenstine William E. Sedlacek Mac A. Stewart M. Rick Turner Clarence G. Williams Raymond A. Winbush

Paper: 978 1 57922 067 9 / $33.50
ADD TO CART

 
What Works
School/College Partnerships to Improve Poor and Minority Student Achievement
A source book providing background, strategies, and profiles of 23 effective partnership efforts.

Paper: 978 1 56377 042 5 / $19.95
ADD TO CART

 
White Teachers / Diverse Classrooms
Creating Inclusive Schools, Building on Students’ Diversity, and Providing True Educational Equity
The point of departure for this new edition, as it was for the first, is the unacceptable reality that, for students of color, school is often not a place to learn but a place of low expectations and failure. In urban schools with concentrations of poverty, often fewer than half the ninth graders leave with a high school diploma. This second edition has been considerably expanded with chapters that illuminate the Asian American, Native American, and Latina/o experience, including that of undocumented students, in our schools. These chapters offer insights into the concerns and issues students bring to the classroom. They also convey the importance for teachers, as they accept difference and develop cultural sensitivity, to see their students as individuals, and avoid generalizations. This need to go beneath the surface is reinforced by a chapter on adopted children, children of mixed race, and “hidden minorities”. White and Black teachers, and teachers of different races and ethnicities, here provide the essential theoretical background, and share their experiences and the approaches they have developed, to create the conditions – in both urban and suburban settings – that enable minority students to succeed. This book encourages reflection and self-examination, and calls for recognizing and reinforcing students’ ability to achieve. It also calls for high expectations for both teachers and students. It demonstrates what it means to recognize often-unconscious biases, confront institutional racism where it occurs, surmount stereotyping, adopt culturally relevant teaching, connect with parents and the community, and integrate diversity in all activities. This book is replete with examples from practice and telling insights that will engage teachers in practice or in service. It should have a place in every classroom in colleges of education and K-12 schools. Its empowering message applies to every teacher working in an educational setting that recognizes the empowerment that comes in celebrating diversity. Each chapter concludes with a set of questions for personal reflection or group discussion.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 595 7 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 596 4 / $33.50
ADD TO CART

E-Book: 978 1 57922 598 8 / $26.99
ADD TO CART

 
Women in Academe
Set: 978 1 57922 407 3 / $75.00
ADD TO CART

 
Women in Academic Leadership
Professional Strategies, Personal Choices
Foreword by Claire Van Ummersen
Colleges and universities benefit from diversity in their leadership roles and profess to value diversity--of thought, of experience, of person. Yet why do women remain under-represented in top academic leadership positions and in key positions along the academic career ladder? Why don’t they advance at a rate proportional to that of their male peers? How do internal and external environmental contexts still influence who enters academic leadership and who survives and thrives in those roles? Women in Academic Leadership complements its companion volumes in the Women in Academe series, provoking readers to think critically about the gendered nature of academic leadership across the spectrum of institutional types. It argues that leadership, the academy, and the nexus of academic leadership, remain gendered structures steeped in male-oriented norms and mores. Blending research and reflection, it explores the barriers and dilemmas that these structures present and the professional strategies and the personal choices women make in order to successfully surmount them. The authors pose questions about how women leaders negotiate between their public and private selves. They consider how women develop a vital sense of self-efficacy along with the essential skills and knowledge they need in order to lead effectively; how they cultivate opportunity; and how they gain legitimacy and maintain authenticity in a male-gendered arena. For those who seek to create an institutional environment conducive to equity and opportunity, this book offers insight into the pervasive barriers facing women of all colors and evidence of the need for a more complex, multi-dimensional view of leadership. For women in academe who seek to reach their professional potential and maintain authenticity, it offers encouragement and a myriad of strategies for their growth and development.

Cloth: 978 1 57922 188 1 / $95.00
ADD TO CART

Paper: 978 1 57922 189 8 / $35.00
ADD TO CART